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DPAC’s Promotions and Marketing Manager Discusses Careers in the Live Entertainment Industry

Did you know one of the nation’s best live entertainment venues is right here in Durham? The Durham Performing Art Center (DPAC) presents Broadway, concert, comedy, and family shows throughout the calendar year. Internships are available for course credit every summer, spring, and fall in a variety of DPAC offices including marketing, sales, facility operations, theatre management, tech production, and programming. 

Alan Foushee, promotions and marketing manager for DPAC, took some time to answer a few questions for the Duke Career Center about career paths, networking, and the job search for the live event industry.

What types of opportunities (e.g. career paths, roles, offices) are in the entertainment industry?

There are many different career routes when it comes to entertainment from for-profit to non-profit, music, comedy, musical theater, fine arts, dance, sports, and all things that fall into “live show biz.” There are also separate segments of the entertainment industry closely related to live entertainment that include exhibitions, mass media and the music industry. Potential careers could include roles in management, ticketing, marketing, programming, production, sales, community relations/education or operations/event services at venues (stadiums, arenas, amphitheaters, theaters and clubs) that promote acts or house sports teams. You could also work from various behind-the-scenes roles that include publicists and press agencies, tour promoters (such as NS2, AEG) and artist management.

Describe a DPAC “dream intern.”
Our dream intern is someone passionate about entertainment with an enthusiasm that is evident in his or her work, ideas and goals. We look for self-starters that aren’t just here to complete their hours, but who want to be a part of actively contributing to a collaborative team.  We want a student who can take a task, think outside the box to apply their vision, communicates their needs and can present/enact a plan on a specified deadline.

How can students best utilize their time in college to gain relevant experience in this industry?
I think the best experience you can have is to work in the industry. Whether that takes the form of an internship or a part-time job, if you have a desire to work in live entertainment get your foot in the door and start building connections with the individuals who hold or hire for the jobs you want. Raleigh-Durham has a very diverse arts and entertainment scene that contains a lot of opportunities to volunteer and seek out different perspectives within the industry. Even on a local level, the industry is very interconnected and tight-knit with the national industry as a whole.

Use your resources available to you as a student to learn the trends within industry and start preparing yourself with the appropriate tools and knowledge. Apply what you’re learning in classes and delve into blogs and trade publications such as Venues Today, Pollstar, and Billboard that give you an eye into what’s going on in entertainment as a whole.

What is the best way to network and find great internships or jobs in live entertainment?
Target where you have an interest in working and seek out internships, then use your time as an intern wisely to network with as many people as possible. While in college, I interned for two years at two different departments within the Carolina Hurricanes NHL organization. When it came time for me to leave the Hurricanes, a director from a department I had never worked with lined up an interview that helped me walk into my current position at DPAC right out of college. You never know who is watching you and how they might be able to serve as a resource for you.

The entertainment industry is very inter-connected with competitors utilizing each other to fill positions of all levels. I would estimate that 50 percent of entry-level jobs are never posted externally as organizations seek to hire from their pool of interns or through their network of contacts with in the industry.

What is your favorite part about working in live entertainment?
I love the buzz that comes from working a show-night, regardless of the genre of music. Seeing people make memories that last a lifetime and knowing that I got to have a part in helping them get there is quite fulfilling. My position also allows for a fast-paced and challenging work environment that provides a great deal of professional growth and room to apply a range of strategies and new technologies, so I also never have an opportunity to get bored.

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Are You "Soy" Confused?

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Flag of the Week Greece

Greece, officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country in Southern Europe on the Mediterranean Coast. According to the 2011 census, Greece's population is around 11 million. Athens is the nation's capital and largest city.
Geographically, Greece is strategically located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and Africa. It also shares land borders with Albania to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north and Turkey to the northeast. The country consists of nine geographic regions: Macedonia, Central Greece, the Peloponnese, Thessaly, Epirus, the Aegean Islands (including the Dodecanese and Cyclades), Thrace, Crete, and the Ionian Islands. The Aegean Sea lies to the east of the mainland, the Ionian Sea to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Greece has an enormous coastline in length, featuring a vast number of islands. Eighty percent of Greece consists of mountains, of which Mount Olympus is the highest.

Modern Greece traces its roots to the civilization of Ancient Greece, which began with the Aegean Civilizations of the Bronze Age. Considered the cradle of all Western civilization, Greece is the birthplace of democracy, Western philosophy, the Olympic Games, Western literature and historiography, political science, major scientific and mathematical principles, and Western drama, including both tragedy and comedy.  Ancient Greece was home to the growth of mythology, city-states, and modern thought, as well. The cultural and technological achievements of Greece greatly influenced the world, with many aspects of Greek civilization being imparted to the East through Alexander the Great's campaigns, and to the West through its incorporation into the Roman Empire. This rich legacy is partly reflected by the 17 UNESCO World Heritage Sites located in Greece. The modern Greek state, which comprises most of the historical core of Greek civilization, was established in 1830 following the war of independence from the Ottoman Empire.

Today, Greece is a democratic developed country with an advanced high-income economy, a high quality of life and a very high Human Development Index. Greece is a founding member of the United Nations, is a prominent member of the EU, and is also a member of numerous other international institutions, including the Council of Europe, NATO, and the World Trade Organization. Greece's economy is also the largest in the Balkans, where Greece is an important regional investor. Despite recent economic difficulties that have hit the country, Greece is projected to make economic gains in 2014.

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Nilla Wafers give her nightmares

Recently, I had the great pleasure of sitting down with Associate Director for Outreach and Development Programming for CAPS and all-around nice guy Gary Glass. The topic: relationships. Relationships in general, with no particular person in mind. It was the first time I'd discussed the topic at length, ever. My conclusion? We should do this more often. So, here is a primer on the subject. More entries are on the way!

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As I write this, it is 9:40am in the morning. In my long tenure of being awake for the past hour, I have already interacted with 8 people. My roommate. The dorm custodian. 2 refectory employees.  2 acquaintances across the quad. 2 close friends.

Had I not been writing this article, I doubt I would have given these interactions much thought.  I don’t think most Duke students would.  Maybe because it’s not trendy. Maybe because we claim not to have the time. Maybe because we’re scared of admitting how much we care.

That’s a shame.

Surely my morning would have been different, if not entirely unsatisfying, without these 8 people. Take that voice, coated in a rich southern twang, that warned me not to slip on the recently mopped Kilgo floors. That’s worth appreciating. Same can be said for the laughter shared with my close friend when she told me, in complete sincerity, that Nilla Wafers give her nightmares.

So what is a relationship?

Imagine the LDOC concert. You’ve just navigated through a mass of neon-colored fanny packs to the center of the crowd. Now you’re enveloped within a crowd of not-quite-so-sober bodies packed together. Shared life experience? Yes. Relationship? Not quite. Because we’re not “engaged in a give and take of our own personhoods,” Gary explains.

(For those of you that rolled your eyes at “personhood.” Bear with me. This is important.)

Maybe some are platonic. Maybe some are romantic. Regardless, we are all in relationships, of one sort or another. And though they might not be fostered in abundance during events like LDOC, they’re everywhere on campus, like they were for me this morning. But despite this ubiquity, I can only articulate fluffy meanings of the word. So, conveniently, I’ll defer to Gary’s definition: “A relationship is a collaboration, whether it’s conscious or not, between people [who are] building a connection, and some shared life experience.”

Collaboration. Connection...Something shared.

I won’t end this entry with some kind of mandate that we acknowledge each and every one of our interactions. But I’ll leave us all with a suggestion--start to notice some of them. Collaborate. Connect. Share.

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Explore what CAPS has to offer.

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Introduction to US Taxes - CLG workshop at IHouse

“We are from Brazil, Canada, China, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Netherlands, UK, Vietnam and many other countries. We are students, scholars, postdocs and spouses. What unites us all is Taxes.” This is not a Tom Lehrer song, but about the last workshop of the Fall 2014 CLG Series, presented by Dr. Li-Chen Chin of IHouse.

Taxes are ubiquitous. So, the workshop began with a discussion among participants about taxation in their home country. Dr. Chin started the presentation by explaining about the taxes that we pay – sales tax, property tax, income tax and the governing structures. Then we plunged headlong into the main topic of discussion for the evening, Income tax.


The first step is to understand the difference between immigration status (F, J or H) and residency status (Resident or Non-Resident) for tax purposes. In the US, the Social Security Number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number determines your identity. Therefore, it is very important not to share it with anyone unless it is deemed necessary. Sources of income that are taxable are wages, scholarship/fellowship that covers your living expenses, awards & prizes, while tuition scholarship that does not cover local expenses and bank interest are not taxable.

We have to file separate tax returns for federal and state taxes. The forms for federal returns for Non-residents are:

  • Form 8843 - If you had no taxable income
  • Forms 1040 NR / 1040 NR-EZ & 8843 – If you had taxable income

Confident that we had understood the basics, we bravely tackled some word problems about federal tax forms. If you are from one of those countries with which US has signed a tax treaty, you may get some tax benefits or exemptions. But it is important to file the paperwork in order to get these benefits. If you are not sure about this, you can get information from Duke Corporate Payroll Service.

Now, let’s look at to the state tax forms. In North Carolina, you have to file a tax return if your federal gross income exceeds $5,500 or if you believe, you are eligible for a tax refund from the state.

If you feel that income tax is the hardest thing in the world to understand, don’t worry, Einstein is said to have felt the same way☺. But, you have enough time to figure this out. For income earned in 2014, the due date for filing tax returns is April 15, 2015. You can get all this information and more at IHouse.

And finally, kudos to IHouse for their grand efforts in stimulating us to Connect, Learn, Grow.
 

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Student-Athletes: Win Over Employers With Your Experience!

I can’t tell you how many Division I student-athletes I have met who happen to mention that they “have no experience.” Some of these athletes have risen to the top of their sports and are training for the Olympics or are navigating professional sponsorship deals, while others are team captains, leading workout sessions, or simply red-shirting their first year. Every single one is practicing and competing at the highest collegiate level while balancing coursework and a myriad of other responsibilities.

No experience?

One of the best quotes that I heard from an employer on campus last year was that she loves to hire athletes because they “know how to lose,” a sentiment that has been shared again and again by other employers coming through the Career Center.

I get it- losing isn’t the highlight of your sport. In fact, there’s nothing more frustrating than devoting countless hours toward training and practice, only to come up short in a game, match or meet.

But, you pick yourself up and you work harder. If you’re doing it right, the loss energizes you. It’s not an obstacle, only an opportunity. You’ve learned how to move forward.

Persistence, drive, dedication.

Student-athletes balance an incredibly challenging schedule. In-season you are constantly practicing, traveling and competing. You are surrounded by your teammates more often than you aren’t, and you maintain a tight schedule for classwork and other extracurriculars. Off-season you are training, working out, monitoring health, and trying to fit in what you can while you have just a bit more free time.

Time management, goal-setting, work ethic.

You push yourself physically and mentally. You wake up early to work out. You lead practices. You exemplify the power of a positive attitude and you contribute everything you have. Sometimes, you need your teammates to help you get to the next level. You work together.

Leadership, teamwork, communication.

Student-athletes tend to say that they “have no experience” when it comes time to start thinking about internship or job searches, writing a resume and cover letter, or interviewing for positions and opportunities off the field. They compare their years at Duke to those of their peers. They tend to see what they don’t have, instead of what they do.

What many student-athletes often overlook are the skills that they are gaining on a daily basis through their sport. To compete in Division I athletics, especially at Duke, student-athletes need to take both their sport and their academics seriously. They must be competitive, goal-oriented and have a strong work ethic. They know what it takes to achieve and they know how to problem-solve when something doesn’t go quite right. They know how to work within a team and they know both how to lead and how to follow. They know how to take initiative, set goals and to follow-through. They know how to recover from challenge and how to work toward achievement.

Many of the skills listed here have probably come naturally, as they’ve been both an ingredient and product of competing in high-level athletics. Most likely, you have all of these skills and you may have taken them for granted as you’ve focused on more immediate goals ahead.

Together, this compilation of skills is not only “experience,” but an incredible collection of experiences. As you think about your possible career path and your next steps, reflect on your time as an athlete. How will you tell your story? Where have you succeeded, and where have you failed? What have you learned? What makes you unique from your classmates and your teammates? What can you bring to a new environment?

Your time as a student-athlete is one of great value. Reflect upon your experience, identify what you’ve gained and the impact that you’ve made, and start telling your story. Employers LOVE to hear about your ability to solve problems, work hard, contribute to a team and recover from challenges. They love to hear your success stories, and the skills you’ve developed and honed both on and off the field. Even more, they love to hear how you can bring these skills to a role at their company or organization.

As you look for opportunities beyond the field, arena, court, pool or track, remember how much experience you do have, and what it demonstrates about you as a candidate. Recognize and articulate the incredible value of your time as a student-athlete and you’ll keep on winning.

photo by Thomson20192

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IFC Recruitment at Duke

Dear Parents,

These initial months at Duke are a very exciting and likely stressful time as son/daughter are adjusting to college life. Although it may have taken a few months, we hope that they have comfortably settled into life here at Duke and are truly experiencing the many opportunities that are afforded to them on campus.

The spring semester brings many new opportunities for involvement throughout campus, one being the possibility of joining one of our Greek-letter-organizations. With the support of the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, there are 42 chapters represented across 4 councils. Greek organizations are composed of the most comprehensive and connected network of men and women on Duke’s campus. Greek students are proud to comprise approximately one third of all undergraduates. Joining this network has many benefits including group housing, peer and alumni advisement, and the ability to sponsor social and philanthropic programming.

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Flag of the Week - Greece

Greece  is a country in Southeast Europe. According to the 2011 census, Greece's population is around 11 million with Athens as the nation's capital and largest city. Greece is strategically located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa, and shares land borders with Albania to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north and Turkey to the northeast. The country consists of nine geographic regions and the Aegean Sea lies to the east of the mainland, the Ionian Sea to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Greece has the 11th longest coastline in the world, featuring a vast number of islands (approximately 1,400, of which 227 are inhabited). Eighty percent of Greece consists of mountains, of which Mount Olympus is the highest, at 2,917 m.

Modern Greece traces its roots to the civilization of Ancient Greece, considered the cradle of Western civilization. As such it is the birthplace of democracy, Western philosophy, the Olympic Games, Western literature and historiography, political science, major scientific and mathematical principles, and Western drama, including both tragedy and comedy. This legacy is partly reflected in the 17 UNESCO World Heritage Sites located in Greece, ranking it 7th in Europe and 13th in the world. The modern Greek state, which encompasses much of the historical core of Greek civilization, was established in 1830, following the Greek War of Independence from the Ottoman Empire.

Greece is a democratic, developed country with an advanced, high-income economy, a high standard of living and a very high Human Development Index. Greece is a founding member of the United Nations, has been a member of what is now the European Union since 1981 (and the eurozone since 2001), and has been a member of NATO since 1952. Greece's economy is also the largest in the Balkans, where Greece is an important regional investor.

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Flag of the Week - South Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is a country located at the southern tip of Africa. It has 1,739 mi of coastline that stretches along the South Atlantic and Indian oceans.

South Africa is a multiethnic society encompassing a wide variety of cultures, languages, and religions. Its pluralistic makeup is reflected in the constitution's recognition of 11 official languages, which is among the highest number of any country in the world.[11] Two of these languages are of European origin: English and Afrikaans, the latter originating from Dutch and serving as the first language of most white and coloured South Africans. Though English is commonly used in public and commercial life, it is only the fourth most-spoken first language.

About 80 percent of South Africans are of black African ancestry, divided among a variety of ethnic groups speaking different Bantu languages, nine of which have official status. The remaining population consists of Africa's largest communities of European (white), Asian (Indian), and multiracial (coloured) ancestry. All ethnic and linguistic groups have political representation in the country's constitutional democracy, which comprises a parliamentary republic and nine provinces. South Africa is often referred to as the "Rainbow Nation," as a metaphor to describe the country's newly developing multicultural diversity in the wake of segregationist apartheid ideology.

South Africa is considered to be a newly industrialised country. Its economy is the second largest in Africa, and the 28th-largest in the world.. South Africa has been identified as a middle power in international affairs, and maintains significant regional influence.

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Our Voice: An Interview with Nandhini Narayanan

Our Voice is a monthly series that highlights students and alumni by Rinzin Dorjee, a student programming assistant at the CSGD. The goal of Our Voice is to create a space for conversations related to LGBTQ issues and the Duke experience from the perspective of students and alumni from different social, cultural and political backgrounds.  For October’s installment, Rinzin interviews Nandhini Narayanan from Chennai, India pursing a Masters in Engineering Management.

 

Rinzin: Hi, I am really happy that you agreed to have this conversation with me. I know we have met before but for our readers, could you introduce briefly, where you are from, where you grown up, etc.?

Nandhini: Sure! My name is Nandhini. I am from Chennai, India. I grew up in a lot of cities in India and I speak about four different Indian dialects. I love India because of its unique culture and food! I enjoy reading and usually read a book ever week. Being here at Duke is extremely hectic but I am not going to give up reading.

 

Rinzin: What kind of books do you read? Is there one you’d particularly recommend to our readers?

Nandhini: I like reading science fiction. I think I’d like to recommend “The Fountain Head”. It proved a wonderful read. Everyone should read it.

 

Rinzin: So, I understand that you are a graduate student here at Duke. What is your stroke? What do you enjoy during your free time? (I doubt anyone here at Duke has it!)

Nandhini: I enjoy meeting new people and Duke is a great place for that. I am into my first semester here at Duke now and so far, it has been great. I will be studying engineering management for the next 18 months of my stay.

 

Rinzin: What was your first impression of Duke?

Nandhini: Gorgeous campus, friendly people who would hold door for you and say hi despite being complete strangers.

 

Rinzin: How is being here at Duke different from your previous institution in India, especially as relates to the LGBT community? Have you any experience with LGBT individuals at your previous school?

Nandhini: Yes, there is a huge difference. I worked with HIV positive men while I was in India for some time and I realized that there isn’t really an open discussion or a discussion of any sort that would bring attention to these kinds of issues. And these things really need to be talked about in an open discussion! I think people back home still associate the term “Gay” with being happy and the like. We are still in that state, probably at least 50- 60 years behind in terms of our knowledge regarding LGBT issues. People are still not aware of what it means to be an LGBT individual or if such an individual exist in the society at large or in their family. Kissing someone you love is still seen as an aberration. I honestly think that we are 60 years behind. It is quite sad in that sense.

 

Rinzin: I was born in India and I have lived there before leaving for the UK. I had the impression that a lot of adolescents are developing an interest in LGBT issues, if not the wider Indian society. What is your opinion on this?

Nandhini: Yes, this is true. A lot of youngsters are learning about these issues directly from US TV series such as Glee, which for one is quite US centric but it deals with LGBT issues to some extent and because it is such a popular show in India, it has its perks. There are several LGBT related organizations in India such as LGBT India that support groups in elevating the level of education regarding LGBT issues, exposure, awareness and what it means to be an LGBT individual.

 

Rinzin: So, now that you brought up this important point. What does it mean to be an LGBT person in your opinion?

Nandhini: I personally think being an LGBT person means being absolutely no different from a straight person.  For the individual, it would mean coming to terms with his or her or their own skin, that this is who he or she is or they are. In the US, you have actual space to do this and people living here are fortunate in that way. Like I said earlier, being an LGBT person means nothing different from being a straight person. You do not wake up in the morning and become a straight person, an LGBT person, a dinosaur. You are who you are and everyone should respect you for your being.

 

Rinzin: Why do you support LGBT rights? Why do you think it is important?

Nandhini: Because it is human to stand up for it. A hundred years ago, people discriminated against people because of their skin color and look where we are now. We have so much to learn from each other if we overcome our differences.  There is no reason whatsoever why someone should isolate or discriminate against someone who is different, who has a different sexual orientation. I think I am just being human when I say I support sexual and gender diversity. I need to and have to associate with someone who is different, who has a story to tell. This is one of the reasons I left India so that I’d be exposed to more cultural openness and understanding. I am a biologist. I tell you one thing – homosexuality exists in nearly all mammals but homophobia exists only in humans.  What does this say about us? Come on, we can be so much better! Like I mentioned earlier, shows like Glee has played a big role. Its popularity among the youngsters has sparked a lot of awareness and discourse, have led to many political statements. I mean in India, even heterosexual relationships are under scrutiny, let alone homosexual relationships.  Important issues related to the spread of AIDS and different types of STIs are not very much talked about. It’s considered taboo. What is education and awareness in this country is seen as taboo there. How can I emphasize this enough? In India, people get disowned because some parents do not approve of their partners and these are heterosexual relationships. My cousin married someone of a different religion and she was disowned instantly. So, you get what I mean when I say we are about 60 years behind. On the bright side, many Bollywood movies such as Dostana brought discussion related to LGBT issues to the dining table. My friend who took his family to see this movie was able to discuss homosexuality with his parents after watching it. Dostana had a huge reception at the LGBT community in India.

 

Rinzin: It is always very interesting to hear what someone from a different cultural background has got to say about being an LGBT individual in a different cultural context. It is insightful in that it gives a picture, very different from the US centric one that we are aware of. To wrap up, could I ask what is one of your favorite quotes?

Nandhini: There are quite a few. Do you know this one – “it is not the mountain ahead that wear you out, it is the pebble in your shoes”. Again, this relates back to how it is crucial for people to change their mindset and try to look at the world differently. Respect everyone for who they are irrespective of their gender or sexual orientation and learn from their personal experience. We have so much to learn from each other.

 

Rinzin: Lastly, what is the one most played song on your Iphone?

Nandhini: Adam Lambert! His voice is made in God’s design studio. I love what he stands for – being bold and different. When he competed in American Idol, his style was deemed too theatrical and despite being predicted by judges that he will not stand a chance, he kept forging ahead and pulled it off in the end. His voice is so powerful. It gives me chills.

 

Rinzin: And, your most embarrassing moment so far at Duke?

Nandhini: Ordering food anywhere on campus!

 

If you would like to be featured in an issue of Our Voice please contact the CSGD at csgd@studentaffairs.duke.edu with the subject title : "Our Voice"

 

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“Soy” What?

As a dietitian I am often asked questions about soy foods acting like estrogen in the body, are they safe? Do they contribute to causing breast cancer? I will admit over the years the information has been varied, but for the past several years researchers have found more and more information confirming that eating soy in moderation even as a breast cancer survivor is not a problem.

Since it is breast cancer awareness month I decided to do some additional research and explain for you in more detail.

First of all let’s think about where you might find soy in the diet, the following is a list of dietary sources:

·         edamame (raw soy beans),

·         soy milk, soy cheeses, soy yogurts

·         tofu (which is made from the bean curd)

·         tempeh (fermented soy)

·         miso (a Japanese flavoring made from fermented soybeans)

·         vegetarian foods like veggies burgers

The parts of the soy bean that are in question when it comes to breast cancer are the phytoestrogens (estrogen hormone-similar chemicals found in plants) known as isoflavones. There are two types of isoflavones in soy, genestein and daidzen. It is important to know that although these compounds can act like estrogen, they are only slightly as potent as the real stuff.

Large population studies of healthy women who reported details about their usual diet and were followed for many years, have shown no association between moderate soy intake and breast cancer rates.  Studies in Asian women have found a lower risk of breast cancer rates with higher soy consumption (4 or more servings per day), whereas studies in the U.S. have not found any association between how much soy a woman consumes and her risk of breast cancer.   Other things to consider are lifelong dietary and lifestyle patterns not noted in these studies.

What about soy intake for breast cancer surviviors? There are studies that show that small amounts of soy are safe and may be protective for surviors. However the best advice is to discuss the pros and cons with your health care provider until more conslusive data is available.

When it comes to taking supplements research is finding mixed results, basically the jury is out and the recommendation is to “avoid concentrated sources of soy such as soy-containing pills or powders, or supplements containing high amounts of isoflavones.” (American Cancer Society).

When making the decision to consume soy or not, remember that tofu and other soy foods have considerable health benefits and are linked to lower rates of heart disease. Because they are excellent sources of protein, soy foods may replace other less healthy foods in the diet and therefore help lower cholesterol. Also soy is an excellent good quality protein alternative for those who follow a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Bottom line: avoid pill and powdered soy supplements and enjoy soy foods in moderation.

Resources:

The American Institute of Cancer Research (www.aicr.org) and The American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org)

 

 

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Eating Healthy on a Budget - CLG at IHouse

Do you enjoy grocery shopping - getting lost in the maze of various aisles, trying to decide what to buy - fresh or frozen produce, generic or name brand, organic or not, wondering if healthy means expensive? No? I thought so. At this week’s CLG, hosted by Seun Bello Olamosu of IHouse, Duke Student Health Dietitian Toni Ann Apadula answered all these questions and also gave us the perfect recipe for a healthy, delicious meal on a budget.

Balancing your Plate
It is always good to start with a plan. Establish a budget, plan your meals and snacks for the week, and remember:  
½ of your plate should be fruits & vegetables – for vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, fiber & carbohydrates
¼ of your plate should be grains – for fiber, B vitamins and carbohydrates
¼ of your plate should be protein – for protein, fats and iron
Healthy Fats – for essential fats to enable the body to work properly.

Then make a grocery list. Be sure to check out the store’s ‘Weekly ad’ for what’s on sale, look for digital / printable coupons and at the store, ask about a loyalty card. Seems quite simple, doesn’t it? Let’s go grocery shopping!
Shopping Strategies – What are your options?

Fruits and Vegetables: Try to make your selection as colorful as possible – it is not just for looks but to get the full spectrum of health benefits. You could choose between Fresh produce which is most expensive vs Frozen which is not so pricey, nutrition content is intact and has longer shelf/freezer life vs Canned which is least expensive, but may contain more salt that can be reduced by rinsing. If you are not able to decide whether to buy Organic, the “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen” gives you some help. Fruits & vegetables are freshest and taste best when they are bought in season (www.ncagr.gov/markets/availabilitychart.pdf).

Grains: Try to choose whole grains. You could pick Name brand which is more expensive vs Store brand which costs less, but usually tastes the same and may have the same ingredients as name brand.

Protein Foods: Try to choose a leaner option. You could buy Animal protein which are most expensive, provide “complete protein” but contain more fat vs Dairy / Nut based protein, which are not so expensive vs Plant based protein / eggs which are least expensive and contain low fat & more fiber.

Is your shopping cart almost full? Before rushing to the billing counter, let me add a few more tips from Toni, as garnish.

Unit price – Compare unit price per lb/oz of various sizes. Larger sizes are often a better buy.
Nutrition facts – This label tells you the % Daily Value of various nutrients in each serving.
Ingredients – The ingredients are listed from most to least. So, if the first ingredient is salt, then you may be in a pickle.

Psst! – Stores stock most expensive items at eye level; so look at higher and lower shelves.

There was never a dull moment. It was amazing to see the active involvement of the participants, asking the most perceptive and interesting questions, and Toni’s patient and informative responses. If you have an appetite for more, try chewing on this.


 

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Letter from DSG President Lavanya Sunder

Dear Parents,

It’s a great time to be a student on campus right now. Fall Break, along with the temporary end of midterms, has given the student body a needed surge of energy, and the improved attitude on campus is definitely palpable. Durham is cooling down, and we’re finally beginning to feel autumn in the air. Our Homecoming game against Virginia is tomorrow (it will be over by the time you read this, GO DUKE!), and midterm elections are right around the corner. With all of this positive momentum, I truly feel that Duke Student Government (DSG) is well positioned to enact many great changes on campus.

One of DSG’s biggest priorities this year has been to make sure that students are able to register to vote for the midterm elections, and get to the polls on Election Day. Primarily, we want to make sure that North Carolina’s new registration and identification requirements do not deter students from registering to vote. Moreover, I am happy to say that we have successfully carried out a large voter registration drive, and are in the midst of planning a voter mobilization campaign.

We’ve also been working on mobilizing students in other ways. One way is through the new Zagster bike-share program. This program was conceived of last year, and after months of deliberation and fine-tuning, the program was finally launched in September. It allows students, faculty, and staff, to rent bikes from any Zagster rack location on campus, ride, and drop them off at any rack location, similar to bike-share programs many municipalities are implementing. We’re hoping that these bikes become a second form of transport between campuses, and provide students with increased mobility in Duke and Durham.

Finally, we’re working on a number of smaller projects throughout the year. Our most recent initiative is the creation of the Duke Student Government Research Unit (DSGRU). DSGRU is a group of students tasked with statistically analyzing large research questions, such as “How do students spend their food points?” or “In what ways do students interact with the Duke Curriculum?” We’ve also continued our work on expanding curricular offers in LGBT studies, strengthening the Duke House model, managing the impact of construction on campus, and much more.

If you’re interested in following any one of these initiatives, or the many more we’re pursuing this year, I encourage you to check out our new website. We have blogs for our Senators, Vice-Presidents, and Cabinet members, and general news updates as well.

It has been a great start for DSG and Duke students in general, and I am looking forward to many accomplishment to come.

 

Best,

Lavanya Sunder

DSG President 

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Trip to Historic Hillsborough - CLG serise at IHouse

“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page” – St. Augustine

When we make travel plans, we often look at the most popular destinations while missing the hidden gems close by. One such destination is nearby Hillsborough, just 20 minutes away. As part of the CLG series, SangHee Jeong of IHouse, organized a trip to this quaint little town, rich in history, culture and beauty. It was a grey, cloudy morning so we trooped into the vans armed with umbrellas, rain jackets, cameras and the itinerary for the day.



Guided Walking Tour
Our trip began with a guided walking tour of Historic Hillsborough. The town was founded in 1754 as the Orange County seat. It is located where the Great Indian Trading Path crossed the Eno river. The tour started at the Alexander Dickson House (1790), known as the “Last Headquarters of Confederacy”, which also serves as the Orange County Visitors Center.

After trying to assimilate more than two and a half centuries of history through maps and exhibits, we headed to the Regulator Marker, the hanging site of colonial protestors. Then, we visited the Hughes Academy (mid – late 1800s), a small private school whose graduates were accepted at UNC without examination. We walked past William Reed’s Ordinary (1754) that was a tavern, the old County Courthouse (1844) that has a clock tower and the old Town Cemetery (1757), where William Hooper, who signed the Declaration of Independence was buried.

Our final stop was the Orange County Historical Museum. On entering, one can see the Orange County Timeline of important events from 1650 to 2000. Then, a quick stop at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, owned and operated by artists. After 1½ hours of sightseeing, legs and stomachs started complaining. So, we split into groups and headed in different directions to try out Hillsborough’s unique dining and shopping. I lunched at Weaver Street Market (their Vegan chocolate cake is delicious), which is a “community owned cooperative grocery store”.

Tour of Ayr Mount Historic Site
After lunch and a little rest, we headed straight to Ayr Mount Historic Site that includes a 19th century house museum and almost 300 acres of woodlands. Some of us took a guided tour of the house, while others enjoyed the Poet’s Walk, which is a one-mile trail that runs along the bank of the Eno river.


Ayr Mount is a federal-era plantation house built in 1815 by William Kirkland, and later purchased, restored and donated for public benefit by Richard Jenrette. Our guide, Bill told us about the ancestry of the owners and the archaeology of that site. In the house, the brick construction, high ceilings, transverse hallway, ornate fireplaces, huge mahogany tables, walnut shelves, grand piano, old time wavy glass windows, the various portraits and artwork (etchings of North Carolina architecture including Duke Chapel) all vie for attention.


We left Hillsborough with the satisfaction of having seen new places and made new friends.

Thanks, SangHee and Annette for making this trip so enjoyable.
   

        
 

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Your Career Story: What to Say and When

Think about the best story you’ve ever heard. What were the components of it? Was it the introduction that got you interested? The center of the Tootsie Roll, where the story began to take shape? Or was it the end, when you finally saw what the author intended when setting out the share the story?

I think all the parts are the best. But then again I WOULD, because I have loved every single page (2,464 pages after three books, #nerdalert) of each of the Game of Thrones books I have read and I #cantstopwontstop until I am done with the whole series (And yes, I do know that the series is called A Song of Ice and Fire. Who’s the nerd, here, hmmmm?)

Back to telling your story… Since George R.R. Martin probably tells his editor “Too bad” when encouraged to shorten his stories, he isn’t a good guide for how you should talk about your career questions/plans/second guesses. As you consider the purpose for sharing your career plans, reflect on what it is you’d like to say to which audience. To put storytelling into an extended metaphor related to narrative, here is what you can share when telling…
1. The Twitter story—140 characters to talk about yourself at a career fair or in your LinkedIn summary
2. The short story—a few paragraphs when conducting an informational interview, networking or writing business correspondence (resumes and cover letters, for example)
3. The novella—for when you are interviewing

If you’re wondering how to prepare for ALL of these story-telling scenarios, take 10 minutes to review and answer the questions below. Think of ONE experience, such as an internship, a volunteer activity, an independent study, or a leadership position, and answer the questions with that single occurrence in mind.
Big Picture Questions
• What is the purpose of your particular story?
• What does this story look like, depending on who you’re telling it to and in what setting?
• What have you learned in this experience (i.e. your internship, the volunteering you’ve done, or through serving in your SLG)?
• Were the skills you learned the most critical part of the experience, particularly when you think of what you would take from that story at this point in your life?

Developing & Editing Questions
• What do you say within each version of that story?
• What are your chapter titles, the sections you want to highlight the most?
• In what settings are you demonstrating different parts of your character?
• What is the first line of your story? The last line?
• What is the sequence of events?
• Where’s the conflict? What challenges have you faced? What have you overcome?
• What is important to retain when you condense the story? What do you want to include when to expand your narrative?

When you’ve written out the answers to these questions, begin to shape language for each of the settings mentioned above. Remember that career counselors are here to help you practice what you’d like to say. Through rehearsal and editing, you’ll find the best parts of your story to share. There will be no dragons to get you down, because you will be ready as winter is coming. (Sorry I’m not sorry, I’ve been with HBO Go a LOT lately. The Rains of Castamere is a sad song.)

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Not Insignificant

We had just wrapped up at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, drained from taking in all the incredible history exhibited in the museum’s three buildings. The consensus was to take the tram to a spot for lunch, then hop on it again to find a baklava shop we’d heard is amazing. The tram is one of several fantastic methods of public transportation used by what feels like everyone (at the same time) in the city of Istanbul. A seat on the bus, metro, or tram is a highly coveted spot that is not easily attained. In fact, sometimes just getting on any of these vehicles is a nearly impossible feat because they are so crowded. “Maximum Capacity” doesn’t seem to be a concept as firmly held here as it is in the U.S. As we approached the tram, desperately seeking nourishment after an exhausting outing of museum-going, we discovered hoards of other people on the platform who we would soon have to fight for a spot. The tram arrived and its doors opened, the poor passengers inside desperately trying to escape before being trampled by the masses boarding. Amidst this commotion, while trying to edge my way in without elbowing an elderly woman in the face, I felt a hand squeezing my butt. Suffering some sensory overload from the experience of getting on the tram, it took me a few seconds to realize this was happening, and to notice that the hand had not let go. When I did finally realize, I whipped around—no easy task when one has no more than a half-inch radius of personal space around her—and attempted to identify to whom the brazen hand belonged. My friend had witnessed this all go down, and pointed to a short, middle-aged man in a blue dress shirt and grey slacks who was holding a briefcase. He had turned to face the door, but looked over his shoulder a few times at me as I glared at him and shared some choice words I wish I knew how to say in Turkish. Our stop came soon after my futile attempt to give him a piece of my mind, and he was quickly lost in the crowd of passengers exiting.

The incident, his subsequent looks of complete indifference at me as I uselessly berated him, and the absence of a reaction from any of the passengers nearby who’d also watched it all happen brought me to the disturbing realization that what I had just experienced was, in a word, insignificant. I felt violated and uncomfortable in my own skin. The members of our group did their best to console me, through belatedly cursing the perpetrator or sharing their own stories of being publicly groped by strangers. I was overwhelmed with fury, but social etiquette urged me to stifle my anger and attempt to distract myself until I could be alone and reflect.

I never thought I would feel more like a compilation of body parts, assembled solely for the purpose of being assessed, criticized, and used by men, than at a Duke fraternity party—until I came to Turkey. I was warned, of course. Both of my parents effectively told me to put my feminist identity on hold during my time in Turkey, reminding me constantly that my views would not be received well in a country whose deputy prime minister told women they shouldn’t laugh out loud in public. They and many others warned me that life would be different as an American woman in Turkey—especially one who does not look Turkish in the slightest—and I would be expected to adapt. I’m okay with adapting. I want to be challenged. I enjoy exploring beyond my comfort zone. Being transformed against my will into a walking piece of meat for men to invade with their stares and debase with their words, among other things, does not fall into any of those categories. Nor does being expected to accept it as normal.

Throughout my first month and a half here, I have already met several incredibly intelligent, outspoken, headstrong Turkish women whose respective brilliances inspire me. Simultaneously, I have seen how the day-to-day culture of male entitlement, especially as expressed through street harassment, treats these women and all women as disposable objects. My experience on the tram was insignificant—to be expected, even. Because, from my western point of view, if you identify as a woman in Turkey, you automatically forfeit the basic human right of being treated as an equal to someone who identifies as a man.

The realization that the previous sentence requires no “in Turkey” to be true is an incredibly uncomfortable truth to accept. The idea of women as objects—to be owned, to be used, to be disposed of, to be replaced—is certainly not unique to this country. As I mentioned, the most objectified I’ve ever felt prior to coming to Turkey is when in attendance at a frat party at Duke. I have realized how easy it is to sit on the high horse of a westernized perspective and criticize other countries for the inequalities they are enforcing and perpetuating. It is far more unsettling to recognize the fact that, though it may manifest itself in different ways, gender inequality is as much a constant in our society as it is anywhere else. Being violated by a stranger on the tram was a blatant reminder that I am living in a man’s world, a world in which my womanhood renders my rights, my experiences, and my value insignificant.

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Daniel Kort at the Queering Duke History

Daniel Kort is a senior psychology major from Los Angeles. He has appeared in The Washington Post, CNN, Cosmopolitan UK, and The Huffington Post for his work as an LGBTQ advocate. He attended 14 years of Jewish day school, spent a high school semester in Israel, and is a part of the Freeman Center's new LEAD program. In his spare time, Daniel enjoys listening to EDM and is a dedicated Cameron Crazie.Daniel Kort T'15, president of Blue Devils United, speaks at the Queering Duke History event held on September 25th.  Please listen as Daniel uses Rosh Hashanah and his Jewish experiences as a way to frame his message.

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Top 50 Colleges with Active Jewish Communities - Best Colleges

For many incoming Jewish freshmen, the presence of a Jewish student body is crucial. Learn more about the top schools with active Jewish communities.  Read more.

 

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HOW TO MAKE AMERICAN-STYLE SMALL TALK - IHouse CLG workshop

“I like your boy’s haircut”, said the Duke bus driver to me, and thus began a very delightful conversation about school, teens, peer pressure and before I knew it my stop had come. I am sure all of us have been in similar situations, but we may become tongue-tied because we are shy. At this week’s CLG Workshop, the host Paige Vinson of IHouse helped us to become “conversant” with how to recognize attempts at small talk, start a conversation, maintain and end it politely.

Paige broke the ice by introducing herself and then gave the participants a chance to practice among themselves. Like many people, I used to think that small talk is just that – talking. Now I know that it could be the start of some meaningful conversations and wonderful friendships. Even people who enjoy talking, may be at a loss for words when they want to start a conversation with someone. Through the presentation, we learned some interesting opening lines. Some of my favorites are:

  • Hello/Hi/Hey, I’m Paige – Nobody can go wrong with this.
  • Nice weather, isn’t it? – This one is evergreen.
  • I really like your scarf/necklace – Makes me feel good about my choice.
  • I haven’t seen you for ages – Wow! She still remembers me.

Once you have picked up courage and started a conversation, how to keep it going beyond the initial exchange?

  • Find a meaningful topic
  • Give extra information
  • Pay close attention to what is said and how it is said
  • Use active listening, Trial and Error

Before you start making small talk, prepare yourself by identifying some “hot” topics like books, movies, restaurants, hobbies and travel. And, some topics to be avoided are: Personal, health, money or family problems, death, crimes, moral values, or any social, economic, political issues.

While it is important to make a good beginning, it is equally important to end the conversation on a positive note. During the course of the workshop Paige explained the difference between Ritual Interactions and Literal Invitations. In her inimitable way, she also gave us some useful tips and tricks on what to do when you don’t remember somebody’s name or if someone doesn’t respond to your attempts at making small talk. By the end of the workshop, I saw the participants eagerly practicing their conversation skills with each other and ending it on the right note too, with invitations to meet again.

Good-bye, or shall I say “Let’s keep in touch”.
 

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Student Health Closed Saturday 10/11

The Student Health Center will be closed on Saturday, 10/11, for Fall Break. We will re-open with normal operating hours on Monday, October 13th, at 8:30am.

For after hours health care options, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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