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Student Health Closing Early 11/20

The Student Health Center will close at 3:45pm on Thursday, 11/20. We will re-open with normal operating hours at 8:30am on Friday, 11/21.

For after hours care, please call us at 919-681-9355. 

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Frienships, Stuck on the Disney Channel

(Entry #3 in the series) Recently, I had the great pleasure of sitting down with Associate Director for Outreach and Development Programming for CAPS and all-around nice guy Gary Glass. The topic: relationships. Relationships in general, with no particular person in mind. It was the first time I'd discussed the topic at length, ever. My conclusion? We should do this more often. Here's #3! Read entries #1 and #2.

It was 2007. Gary stood with a group of students, asking them to move to the “True” or “False” side of the room in response to a few statements.

If a peer had been struggling, you’d want them to know they could come to you.
Everyone in the room moved to “True” side of the room.

If you were struggling, you would go to a peer for support.
Everyone in the room moved to the “False” side of the room.

Well that’s awkward. Everyone wanted to help. No one wanted to ask for help.

Fast forward to 2014 where, fortunately, some things have changed. We still have great people on campus. And we definitely, definitely still have problems (though you probably didn’t need me to tell you that). The difference, according to Gary? We’re admitting it now.  

Woohoo personal issues!!!!

Don’t get me wrong. Sometimes the best way to get rid of a problem is pretend it doesn’t exist. You’ve just been dumped, and you don’t want to give the satisfaction to that @$#&%! that you’re thinking about him/her enough to feel sad? Fake the pride and self-preservation. It will feel real soon enough. Or how about the oh-so-relatable experience of conversing in small talk (more like “ugh” talk) during SLG/Sorority/Fraternity Rush? Fake the confidence. It's not really fake confidence. It’s in there somewhere (and for good reason).

But sometimes you can’t fake it to make it. You have to dive in—heart first, fear second—with a trusted friend by your side. Gary told me that a healthy relationship had “mutual vulnerability.” Maybe another way to think about it is that happy, healthy relationships have, by definition, unhappy moments. Without that, they’d be stuck on the Disney channel.

I’ll end with a moment.

It was the night that commemorated my brother’s death. And still, 11 years later, the day shook 20-year-old me more than the 9-year-old me could have imagined. The tears came slowly at first. I wiped them away. Would my Duke friends even get it? Probably not. But all the same, the tears became many. And I sobbed. For a long time. And sure, perhaps they didn’t “know” what I was feeling. And I imagine they were uncomfortable, or at a minimum lost for words. But they held me. They heard me. And they loved me through every moment of that pain.

They’ve been my best friends ever since.

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Flag of the Week - Hungary

Hungary, formally, until 2012, the Republic of Hungary, is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is situated in the Carpathian Basin and is bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine and Romania to the east, Serbia and Croatia to the south, Slovenia to the southwest and Austria to the west. The country's capital and largest city is Budapest. Hungary is a member of the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the Visegrád Group, and the Schengen Area. The official language is Hungarian, which is the most widely spoken non-Indo-European language in Europe.

Hungary's current borders were first established by the Treaty of Trianon (1920) after World War I, when the country lost 71% of its territory, 58% of its population, and 32% of ethnic Hungarians. Following the interwar period, Hungary joined the Axis Powers in World War II, suffering significant damage and casualties. Hungary came under the influence of the Soviet Union, which contributed to the establishment of a four-decade long communist dictatorship (1947–1989). The country gained widespread international attention regarding the Revolution of 1956 and the seminal opening of its previously-restricted border with Austria in 1989, which accelerated the collapse of the Eastern Bloc.

On 23 October 1989, Hungary again became a democratic parliamentary republic, and is today an upper-middle income country with a very high Human Development Index. Hungary is a popular tourist destination attracting 10.675 million tourists a year (2013). It is home to the largest thermal water cave system and the second largest thermal lake in the world (Lake Hévíz), the largest lake in Central Europe (Lake Balaton), and the largest natural grasslands in Europe (the Hortobágy National Park).

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Happy (Healthy) Holidays!

It’s mid-November – chances are you’ve adapted pretty well to your school eating routines by now – whether it’s eating with friends or grabbing a bite on the way to the next class or meeting. But wouldn’t you know it, the holidays are just around the corner and everything is about to change again.  The holidays can be a wonderful time of year, but they are usually associated with a lot of food and eating: for some this can be challenging. Consider using some of the following tips to stay well and focused during this time.

  1. Set reasonable goals. This usually isn’t the time of year to work on any type of weight loss goals, so aim instead to maintain your weight.
  2. Try not to let yourself get too hungry. Your holiday meal will likely have a bunch of delicious foods to indulge in. Before you head out, try to eat a light, balanced snack, such as a piece of fruit with some yogurt or peanut butter, a granola bar, half of a sandwich, or some soup about an hour before leaving. That way you have better control over food selections and portion sizes at the party.
  3. Avoid skipping meals. We may think skipping meals is a good idea when we know we have a big holiday meal to look forward to, but chances are if you skip meals you will be over hungry when it’s meal time and will likely overeat.
  4. Choose your foods wisely: There will be plenty of options, but if you’re trying to choose healthier options, choose more of the fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, and seafood. This will allow room for a holiday dessert!
  5. Mindful Eating: If you are concerned about overeating, remember to eat slowly and savor these special holiday foods – some of which you only get to eat once a year. Eating slowly will allow you to appreciate these foods and recognize when you’re full. A helpful tip to eat slower is to have a conversation with a friend or family member, take smaller portions, and consciously sip your drink throughout. (This is a great tip year-round!)
  6. Eat a balanced meal: Aim for a good source of protein, such as turkey, chicken, fish and tofu, and balance it with a healthy starch, such as whole grain bread, sweet potatoes or brown rice. The protein slows digestion to help you feel satisfied, and keep you fuller longer.
  7. Chill out: Try to not get stressed out by family and friends you haven’t seen in a while. Try to manage your stress with activities other than eating – take a walk, visit a friend, or put on some music.
  8. Exercise: You may find being home for holidays allows you more time to move – try to get exercise most mornings before the days get too crazy. Even a brisk walk or stroll will help with digestion, stress relief, and fitness. However, don’t overdo just because you have more time. Remember, if you wish to continue exercising regularly, it will need to fit into your routine at school.
  9. Enjoy: remember being home for the holidays usually means no homework! Focus on your friends and family and try to not over-think your food.
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Family Weekend - 2015 Update

Community, connection, and Duke spirit — that's what Family Weekend at Duke is all about. Every year we welcome over a thousand Duke families to campus to share in the Duke student experience, which includes everything from brunch in the Marketplace to a cappella concerts by award-winning student ensembles, as well as the popular Student for a Day talks and thrilling Duke athletic events. We pack as much of the Duke experience into one weekend as we can, so students and their families can share in the excitement together.

We had great success this past Family Weekend, and we, like you, are looking forward to next year! We have one addition to the schedule that will add even more excitement to the mix: a home Duke football game on Saturday. Imagine spending the day with your family, tailgating with delicious Southern barbecue in beautiful Durham Fall weather, and cheering on our (currently 8-1!) football team in a stadium full of Duke blue. We can't wait to share this with you.

This addition to the schedule means we will need the ACC schedule for Duke football games before we can select dates for Family Weekend. Typically, the Duke football schedule is announced in mid-March, and our timeline for announcing Family Weekend dates will be similar. We apologize for any inconvenience, and hope that the community and opportunities connected will more than make up for it. We will publicize the dates once selected via the Parent and Family website: http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/parents, Parents Newsletter, and Duke parent Facebook page.

We look forward to seeing you next year at Family Weekend 2015! Go Duke!

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Family Weekend 2014 Recap

It was wonderful to have so many families on campus for Family Weekend 2014! In all we had more than 2500 registered guests that made the trip to Durham to share in their student’s college experience. This year’s programming included a wide variety of events, presentations, and performances from throughout the Duke community.


Among the highlights:

  • An address from President Richard Brodhead
  • The Family Weekend kickoff address by the Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students, Sue Wasiolek 
  • Special discussions from two of Duke’s acclaimed faculty members, Dr. Mohamed Noor and Dr. Denise Comer
  • Emmitt and Pat Smith hosted an incredible event with the Library, hosted by their daughter Jasmin (who really stole the show) 
  • Wonderful concerts from Duke a capella, jazz, chorale groups and more
  • Student performances including Duke Improv, Hoof n’ Horn


Duke Athletics also enjoyed a successful Family Weekend with wins by several Olympic sports teams. 

We hope all of our visitors enjoyed their time at Duke. It was wonderful meeting so many of you, and please know that we really do view you as partners in your student’s success.

Many have begun to ask about the dates for Family Weekend 2015, and when they will be confirmed for next year. Stay tuned to www.studentaffairs.duke.edu/parents for the latest updates and details.


Best regards,
Parent & Family Programs

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I had never heard the word “sucks” so many times in 30-seconds

Post #2 in the series. Recently, I had the great pleasure of sitting down with Associate Director for Outreach and Development Programming for CAPS and all-around nice guy Gary Glass. The topic: relationships. Relationships in general, with no particular person in mind. It was the first time I'd discussed the topic at length, ever. My conclusion? We should do this more often. I wrote one entry already. Read post #1.

One of the joys to living in a dorm with thin walls, as I did my freshman year, is that you could innocently eavesdrop on whatever conversation topics your neighbors chose to shout about. Yes, I mean shout. After all, inside voices are so pre-school.

Anyways, one exchange (“conversation” hardly feels appropriate) was particularly memorable because I had never heard the word “sucks” so many times in a 30-second period. Apparently, some guy had screwed up. Big time.

An excerpt:
He sucks. Oh my god, he SUCKS…..[pause]….. HE. SUCKS. ….[pause]…. Sucksucksucksucksucks. He sucks more than anyone ever has. …[pause] SUCKS!

Though I couldn’t stop laughing that fateful fall afternoon, I can hardly criticize my neighbors’ attempt to articulate the dynamics of what was clearly, wait for it, a sucky relationship. It would be hypocritical of me. As a junior, 3 years later, it can still be hard for me to come to peace with relationships, platonic or not, that just feel and turn meh. Maybe they hurt. Maybe they sour. Or maybe it’s nothing you can identify. It just feels off.

Cue the wisdom of Gary Glass.

“The language I use for that is failed vs. ended relationships,” he told me. “I define a failed relationship as one in which a person didn’t learn anything about themselves, or about relationships. There was no growth. Other relationships, there is learning about myself or the other person. It ran its course, and it ended. But these are clarifying. They build a sense of resilience because they hurt, and you heal from the hurt.”

So to all the Dukies out there who might feel in a funk: Just remember, no matter how much it may sting, that relationship you’re hurting from was hardly lost time, so long as you grow from it.

Let yourself hurt. Let yourself learn.

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Duke Intern Influences National Marketing Campaign for Broadway’s Touring Production of Wicked

Q & A about Derek’s internship experience:
Your hometown:  Potomac, MD (just outside Washington, D.C.)

Your graduation date: May 2012 (but I graduated a year early)

Your major (and any minors + certificates): I majored in Political Science (American Politics) and minored in Psychology.

Your current job (title, employer, city, state): Proposal/Contracts Manager, T and T Consulting Services in Washington, D.C.

Student groups in which you participated at Duke: Duke Marketing Club, Duke Library Party, Asian Students Association, Multicultural Center, Center for Race Relations, International House, Leadership Roundtable, etc.

Other internships:
Outreach Intern at The Washington Bus, DukeEngage Program – Seattle
Youth Program Development Intern at Asian & Pacific Islander American Vote, Washington DC
Senate Page in the Maryland General Assembly, Maryland State House – Annapolis, MD
Congressional Intern for Congressman Chris Van Hollen (MD-08) at the United States House of Representatives, Washington DC

Overview of your general DPAC intern duties:
Assist the Managers for Concerts/Comedy and Broadway as integral parts of the marketing team.
Maintain presence for DPAC performances on social networking websites and event calendars.
Assist with media relations and press, including writing press releases and organizing press drops.
Participate in strategic planning and special events.
File and organize marketing settlements.
Help promote DPAC events by organizing promotional efforts both internally and on a grassroots level.

Discuss how you came to think of, create and facilitate your Wicked social media marketing idea. Why and how did you do it? What were the results?
I had the privilege of being blessed with a number of great Broadway shows and Concert/Comedy performances during my internship at DPAC, and supporting the marketing of Wicked was the ultimate culmination and test of what I could accomplish as a Marketing and Public Relations intern. Having seen Wicked on Broadway back in high school, I was already familiar with the show and felt strongly about its core messages. I knew that Wicked would be an opportunity to get people into the theatre, and I had a feeling that it would be many young people’s first experience in the theatre. I wanted it to be memorable. I was driven by how I had the opportunity to bring a diverse group of people into the theatre and enjoy a show that I had loved so much growing up.

My ideas for the viral Wicked social media marketing campaign really stemmed from the intersection of my familiarity with the show, the ad campaigns I had been studying in my marketing course at Duke, and the lessons I had learned leading social media marketing campaigns for previous Broadway engagements at DPAC over the course of my internship. I had the privilege of having awesome internship supervisors at DPAC that really afforded me the opportunity to think big; being part of what felt like a very flat non-hierarchical organization really helped to get the creative juices flowing in brainstorming ideas to engage our online audience.

I came up with my ideas predominately by looking back at the content and the major themes of the show—going through line-by-line and identifying areas where core themes were developed, then using those lines and evolving them into campaign ideas. For instance, the song “For Good” has a line about leaving a “handprint on your heart.” As the emotional climax of the show, it left a strong impression on me since we sang it at our high school graduation; from that, I developed an online competition where we would ask our followers on Facebook to post who in their lives had left the greatest “handprint on their hearts.” The hundreds of stories posted were great, and it was a neat opportunity for people familiar with the show to connect with it—and win some awesome Wicked merchandise and show tickets in the process.

Although my internship ended during the Wicked run, from what I understand, the social media marketing campaign was a hit. Because of its success (both in terms of boosting student ticket sales and fan engagement), the national touring production of Wicked decided to use some of the ideas I came up with in-house at DPAC in their national marketing. They say that imitation is the best form of flattery, and having the national production of a Broadway show I grew up loving use one of my ideas was pretty neat.

(Derek Mong with a fellow DPAC intern, and the cast of Jersey Boys)

Advice you have for other Dukies on making the most of their internship:
Don’t think of yourself as “just an intern,” and treat everyday as seriously as if it were a job interview.  It’s really tempting to think of yourself as an insignificant part of the team when you’re an intern—especially if you’re a part-time intern like I was with a definite end-date on the internship. However, as much as possible, it’s important to get yourself out of that mindset. Now that I’m managing interns at my current job, I can really see how important interns are and how much value they can bring to an organization.  Never forget that.

The second piece of advice I have is to not be afraid to bring new skills or ideas to the table. I came in with experience in video-editing, and, while it wasn’t part of the job description, I brought it up with my intern supervisor and was able to use and refine that skill developing viral videos for the Broadway productions we had that season. Bring everything to the table.

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Flag of the Week - Qatar

Qatar, officially the State of Qatar, is a sovereign Arab country located in Western Asia, occupying the small Qatar Peninsula on the northeastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. Its sole land border is with Saudi Arabia to the south, with the rest of its territory surrounded by the Persian Gulf. A strait in the Persian Gulf separates Qatar from the nearby island kingdom of Bahrain. In 2013, Qatar's total population was 1.8 million; 278,000 Qatari citizens and 1.5 million expatriates. Although tiny, Qatar wields significant clout due to its natural gas wealth and its sovereign wealth fund, which is one of the world's largest.
Following Ottoman rule, Qatar became a British protectorate in the early 20th century until gaining independence in 1971. Qatar has been ruled by the Al Thani family since the mid-19th century. Qatar is an absolute monarchy and its head of state is Emir Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani. After Saudi Arabia, Qatar is the most conservative society in the Gulf Cooperation Council as most Qataris adhere to the strict Wahhabi interpretation of Islam. Sharia law is the main source of Qatari legislation according to Qatar's Constitution.

Qatar is the world's richest country per capita and has the highest human development in the Arab World; furthermore, it is recognized as a high income economy by the World Bank. Qatar has the world's third largest natural gas reserves and oil reserves in excess of 25 billion barrels. Qatar has become an influential player in the Arab world. Qatar supported several rebel groups during the Arab Spring both financially and by asserting global influence through its expanding media group, Al Jazeera Media Network. Qatar will host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, becoming the first Arab country to host the even.

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Just Smile!

SMILE and follow these tips for a healthy immune system!

https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/blog-entry/smile-your-way-staying-well

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Five Things About Museum Careers You Need To Know

1. You need to work in a museum before you can work in a museum
This means that prior museum experience is pretty much mandatory even for entry-level museum jobs.  Let’s just say that there are lots of applicants for every museum position, and the ones that have prior museum experience rise to the top of the pile. Volunteering and internships are very important to prepare for a museum career.

2. You will likely have to go where the job is, i.e. be prepared to move
There are a lot of museums out there, but the jobs open sporadically and you never know where one is going to turn up…it may be in a small town in the Midwest or a large city on the East Coast.

3. Size matters
There’s a big difference between working at a small museum with 10 employees and working at a huge institution with 250 employees. The larger the museum, the more focused and specific your job will be. The smaller the museum, the more you’ll get to do a little bit of everything and have more variety…and sometimes that means cleaning the bathrooms (ask me how I know). Also, your benefits are likely to be better at a bigger institution or one that’s part of a large university.

4. Museums are about visitors
You thought museums were about objects, art and artifacts, right? Well, they are, but these days there’s also a strong emphasis on being visitor-centered—making objects/exhibitions accessible and welcoming to the general public.

5. You get to keep learning
At most museums there are new and rotating exhibitions, which means that as a staff member you are constantly getting the opportunity to learn cool new things as part of your job! Trust me—it’s awesome.

Did you know the Nasher Museum offers fall and spring, for-credit internships and paid summer internships? All internships are in the following departments: education, marketing/communications, development, registrars, curatorial, academic programs, special events, and evaluation and assessment. Summer funding is also available to support internships at other museums (including the Peggy Guggenheim in Venice Internship program).

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Flag of the Week - United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a sovereign state in Europe. Lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland, the country includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the UK that shares a land border with another state: the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the UK is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea in the east and the English Channel in the south. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. The UK has an area 94,060 sq mi, making it the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world and the 11th-largest in Europe.

The United Kingdom is the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 64.1 million inhabitants. It is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of governance. Its capital city is London, an important global city and financial centre with the fourth-largest urban area in Europe. The current monarch—since 6 February 1952—is Queen Elizabeth II. The UK consists of four countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The latter three have devolved administrations, each with varying powers, based in their capitals. The UK has fourteen Overseas Territories, including the disputed Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, and Indian Ocean Territory.

The United Kingdom is a developed country and has the world's sixth-largest economy by nominal GDP and tenth-largest by purchasing power parity. The country has the 2nd largest amount of external debt, behind only the United States. It was the world's first industrialised country and the world's foremost power during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The UK remains a great power with considerable economic, cultural, military, scientific, and political influence internationally is a recognised nuclear weapons state and its military expenditure ranks sixth in the world. The UK has been a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council since its first session in 1946. It has been a member state of the European Union (EU) and its predecessor, the European Economic Community (EEC), since 1973.

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Duke Common Experience, Class of 2019

Nominations are now being accepted for the Class of 2019 Duke Common Experience. As a piece of the coming changes to Orientation this summer, we have decided to enhance our Summer Reading program. While we will still have a book the incoming class will read, there will be a variety of programs connected to the book both during the summer and over the course of the fall semester. These will include:

  • ​Virtual content sharing of key themes and ideas over the summer months
  • Connection with Alumni Affairs in reading the selection
  • Speakers and programs during the year connected to the selection
  • One over-arching theme that connects the selection to programs here at Duke during the year

However, the biggest change is the format for hosting the author and discussion about the book and what we seek to do over the summer.

When students come to campus, instead of relying solely on FAC chats, our plan it to co-host a program at DPAC. We are excited about this new programming opportunity and see it as a chance to enhance our current DPAC program, add to the intellectual experience of the summer reading, and allow us to choose different types of books that can then be highlighted and/or performed for the incoming class.

As a reminder, the text selected for The Duke Common Experience is designed to give incoming students a shared intellectual connection with other members of their class. The selection committee who will choose the text is comprised of faculty, staff, and students.
In addition to being readable, enjoyable and engaging, the selection must:

  • Enrich the intellectual life of students
  • Promote a shared/common experience among first-year students
  • Prompt stimulating debate and lively discussion outside of the classroom
  • Foster interaction between and among peers

Suggestions for books can be made online at the fo​llowing website:
https://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dmsg2fhSFgUAHwV

Nominations will be taken through Friday, November 15th. Please feel free to suggest as many books as you'd like and pass along this message to students, faculty and other staff.

Thank you for your support of Duke's continual development of Orientation Week, the first year experience of our students and our collaboration with campus and community partners.

​Jordan Hale and Simon Partner
Co-Chairs, Duke Summer Reading Committee

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Smile Your Way to Staying Well

You’ve heard it circulating for weeks now like bad background music – the symphony of sneezes in your stat lecture, the cacophony of coughs in comp-sci, the serenade of sniffles on the C1.  Everywhere you turn, Duke seems to be coming down with something, be it the never-ending cold, the dreaded flu, or some unnamed combination of sore throat, runny nose, and congestion.  Toss in the stress of impending midterms and busy weekend plans and it may seem imminent that you’ll be next in line at Student Health.  But before you get too resigned to the idea of getting sick this season, remember to SMILE and follow these tips for keeping your immune system in top shape:

Sleep – Getting a full night’s worth of shut-eye is important for fighting off sickness.  Sleeping less than the recommended 8 hours per night has been shown to reduce your immune resistance and make you more susceptible to contagious illnesses like the flu.  While it may sometimes seem impossible to get enough sleep with a heavy Duke workload, prioritizing a good night’s sleep will make you healthier, happier, and more productive during the day.  

Move – Aim for 30-60 minutes of physical activity on most days of the week to keep your stress levels low and your immunity high.  Those who are regularly physically active are less susceptible to upper respiratory infections and colds.  More is not always better, however, as over-exercise or strenuous exercise while sick can lead to increased fatigue and vulnerability to bacteria and illness.  Listen to your body when deciding on your workout day-to-day.  Just going for a walk can improve your mood and immunity! 

Invest in Rest & Well-Being – If you’re already feeling under the weather, give yourself and your body a break. Take conscious time to care for yourself physically and mentally – let yourself nap, take a break from the gym, get plenty of fluids and nutrients, stay in on the weekend to watch a movie, read a book, or catch up on sleep.  It’s easy to get caught up in the fast pace of life at Duke, but making an effort to slow down once in a while can have great benefits for your stress levels and your immune system. 

Lots of Soap! – Washing your hands frequently, especially before eating, is the most important thing you can do to prevent getting sick.  Keep hand sanitizer accessible, but also be sure to wash with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.  Washing between your fingers and under your nails is also important to eliminate illness-causing germs and bacteria.

Eat your Fruits, Veggies & Fats – Eating 5-9 servings of colorful fruits and vegetables every day will provide your body with the vitamins and minerals it needs to best fight disease and infection.  Omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish, nuts, and flax seeds are also crucial to stimulating your white blood cells that literally eat up germs!

With a little extra mindfulness put towards your physical and mental wellbeing, you’ll greatly increase your chances of staying cold and flu-free this fall and winter.  Aim to be your healthiest and happiest self this season and you’ll no doubt reap the benefits in your studies and your social life - it’s an investment well worth your while.   

 

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DPAC’s Promotions and Marketing Manager Discusses Careers in the Live Entertainment Industry

Did you know one of the nation’s best live entertainment venues is right here in Durham? The Durham Performing Art Center (DPAC) presents Broadway, concert, comedy, and family shows throughout the calendar year. Internships are available for course credit every summer, spring, and fall in a variety of DPAC offices including marketing, sales, facility operations, theatre management, tech production, and programming. 

Alan Foushee, promotions and marketing manager for DPAC, took some time to answer a few questions for the Duke Career Center about career paths, networking, and the job search for the live event industry.

What types of opportunities (e.g. career paths, roles, offices) are in the entertainment industry?

There are many different career routes when it comes to entertainment from for-profit to non-profit, music, comedy, musical theater, fine arts, dance, sports, and all things that fall into “live show biz.” There are also separate segments of the entertainment industry closely related to live entertainment that include exhibitions, mass media and the music industry. Potential careers could include roles in management, ticketing, marketing, programming, production, sales, community relations/education or operations/event services at venues (stadiums, arenas, amphitheaters, theaters and clubs) that promote acts or house sports teams. You could also work from various behind-the-scenes roles that include publicists and press agencies, tour promoters (such as NS2, AEG) and artist management.

Describe a DPAC “dream intern.”
Our dream intern is someone passionate about entertainment with an enthusiasm that is evident in his or her work, ideas and goals. We look for self-starters that aren’t just here to complete their hours, but who want to be a part of actively contributing to a collaborative team.  We want a student who can take a task, think outside the box to apply their vision, communicates their needs and can present/enact a plan on a specified deadline.

How can students best utilize their time in college to gain relevant experience in this industry?
I think the best experience you can have is to work in the industry. Whether that takes the form of an internship or a part-time job, if you have a desire to work in live entertainment get your foot in the door and start building connections with the individuals who hold or hire for the jobs you want. Raleigh-Durham has a very diverse arts and entertainment scene that contains a lot of opportunities to volunteer and seek out different perspectives within the industry. Even on a local level, the industry is very interconnected and tight-knit with the national industry as a whole.

Use your resources available to you as a student to learn the trends within industry and start preparing yourself with the appropriate tools and knowledge. Apply what you’re learning in classes and delve into blogs and trade publications such as Venues Today, Pollstar, and Billboard that give you an eye into what’s going on in entertainment as a whole.

What is the best way to network and find great internships or jobs in live entertainment?
Target where you have an interest in working and seek out internships, then use your time as an intern wisely to network with as many people as possible. While in college, I interned for two years at two different departments within the Carolina Hurricanes NHL organization. When it came time for me to leave the Hurricanes, a director from a department I had never worked with lined up an interview that helped me walk into my current position at DPAC right out of college. You never know who is watching you and how they might be able to serve as a resource for you.

The entertainment industry is very inter-connected with competitors utilizing each other to fill positions of all levels. I would estimate that 50 percent of entry-level jobs are never posted externally as organizations seek to hire from their pool of interns or through their network of contacts with in the industry.

What is your favorite part about working in live entertainment?
I love the buzz that comes from working a show-night, regardless of the genre of music. Seeing people make memories that last a lifetime and knowing that I got to have a part in helping them get there is quite fulfilling. My position also allows for a fast-paced and challenging work environment that provides a great deal of professional growth and room to apply a range of strategies and new technologies, so I also never have an opportunity to get bored.

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Are You "Soy" Confused?

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Flag of the Week Greece

Greece, officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country in Southern Europe on the Mediterranean Coast. According to the 2011 census, Greece's population is around 11 million. Athens is the nation's capital and largest city.
Geographically, Greece is strategically located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and Africa. It also shares land borders with Albania to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north and Turkey to the northeast. The country consists of nine geographic regions: Macedonia, Central Greece, the Peloponnese, Thessaly, Epirus, the Aegean Islands (including the Dodecanese and Cyclades), Thrace, Crete, and the Ionian Islands. The Aegean Sea lies to the east of the mainland, the Ionian Sea to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Greece has an enormous coastline in length, featuring a vast number of islands. Eighty percent of Greece consists of mountains, of which Mount Olympus is the highest.

Modern Greece traces its roots to the civilization of Ancient Greece, which began with the Aegean Civilizations of the Bronze Age. Considered the cradle of all Western civilization, Greece is the birthplace of democracy, Western philosophy, the Olympic Games, Western literature and historiography, political science, major scientific and mathematical principles, and Western drama, including both tragedy and comedy.  Ancient Greece was home to the growth of mythology, city-states, and modern thought, as well. The cultural and technological achievements of Greece greatly influenced the world, with many aspects of Greek civilization being imparted to the East through Alexander the Great's campaigns, and to the West through its incorporation into the Roman Empire. This rich legacy is partly reflected by the 17 UNESCO World Heritage Sites located in Greece. The modern Greek state, which comprises most of the historical core of Greek civilization, was established in 1830 following the war of independence from the Ottoman Empire.

Today, Greece is a democratic developed country with an advanced high-income economy, a high quality of life and a very high Human Development Index. Greece is a founding member of the United Nations, is a prominent member of the EU, and is also a member of numerous other international institutions, including the Council of Europe, NATO, and the World Trade Organization. Greece's economy is also the largest in the Balkans, where Greece is an important regional investor. Despite recent economic difficulties that have hit the country, Greece is projected to make economic gains in 2014.

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Nilla Wafers give her nightmares

Recently, I had the great pleasure of sitting down with Associate Director for Outreach and Development Programming for CAPS and all-around nice guy Gary Glass. The topic: relationships. Relationships in general, with no particular person in mind. It was the first time I'd discussed the topic at length, ever. My conclusion? We should do this more often. So, here is a primer on the subject. More entries are on the way!

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As I write this, it is 9:40am in the morning. In my long tenure of being awake for the past hour, I have already interacted with 8 people. My roommate. The dorm custodian. 2 refectory employees.  2 acquaintances across the quad. 2 close friends.

Had I not been writing this article, I doubt I would have given these interactions much thought.  I don’t think most Duke students would.  Maybe because it’s not trendy. Maybe because we claim not to have the time. Maybe because we’re scared of admitting how much we care.

That’s a shame.

Surely my morning would have been different, if not entirely unsatisfying, without these 8 people. Take that voice, coated in a rich southern twang, that warned me not to slip on the recently mopped Kilgo floors. That’s worth appreciating. Same can be said for the laughter shared with my close friend when she told me, in complete sincerity, that Nilla Wafers give her nightmares.

So what is a relationship?

Imagine the LDOC concert. You’ve just navigated through a mass of neon-colored fanny packs to the center of the crowd. Now you’re enveloped within a crowd of not-quite-so-sober bodies packed together. Shared life experience? Yes. Relationship? Not quite. Because we’re not “engaged in a give and take of our own personhoods,” Gary explains.

(For those of you that rolled your eyes at “personhood.” Bear with me. This is important.)

Maybe some are platonic. Maybe some are romantic. Regardless, we are all in relationships, of one sort or another. And though they might not be fostered in abundance during events like LDOC, they’re everywhere on campus, like they were for me this morning. But despite this ubiquity, I can only articulate fluffy meanings of the word. So, conveniently, I’ll defer to Gary’s definition: “A relationship is a collaboration, whether it’s conscious or not, between people [who are] building a connection, and some shared life experience.”

Collaboration. Connection...Something shared.

I won’t end this entry with some kind of mandate that we acknowledge each and every one of our interactions. But I’ll leave us all with a suggestion--start to notice some of them. Collaborate. Connect. Share.

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Explore what CAPS has to offer.

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Introduction to US Taxes - CLG workshop at IHouse

“We are from Brazil, Canada, China, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Netherlands, UK, Vietnam and many other countries. We are students, scholars, postdocs and spouses. What unites us all is Taxes.” This is not a Tom Lehrer song, but about the last workshop of the Fall 2014 CLG Series, presented by Dr. Li-Chen Chin of IHouse.

Taxes are ubiquitous. So, the workshop began with a discussion among participants about taxation in their home country. Dr. Chin started the presentation by explaining about the taxes that we pay – sales tax, property tax, income tax and the governing structures. Then we plunged headlong into the main topic of discussion for the evening, Income tax.


The first step is to understand the difference between immigration status (F, J or H) and residency status (Resident or Non-Resident) for tax purposes. In the US, the Social Security Number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number determines your identity. Therefore, it is very important not to share it with anyone unless it is deemed necessary. Sources of income that are taxable are wages, scholarship/fellowship that covers your living expenses, awards & prizes, while tuition scholarship that does not cover local expenses and bank interest are not taxable.

We have to file separate tax returns for federal and state taxes. The forms for federal returns for Non-residents are:

  • Form 8843 - If you had no taxable income
  • Forms 1040 NR / 1040 NR-EZ & 8843 – If you had taxable income

Confident that we had understood the basics, we bravely tackled some word problems about federal tax forms. If you are from one of those countries with which US has signed a tax treaty, you may get some tax benefits or exemptions. But it is important to file the paperwork in order to get these benefits. If you are not sure about this, you can get information from Duke Corporate Payroll Service.

Now, let’s look at to the state tax forms. In North Carolina, you have to file a tax return if your federal gross income exceeds $5,500 or if you believe, you are eligible for a tax refund from the state.

If you feel that income tax is the hardest thing in the world to understand, don’t worry, Einstein is said to have felt the same way☺. But, you have enough time to figure this out. For income earned in 2014, the due date for filing tax returns is April 15, 2015. You can get all this information and more at IHouse.

And finally, kudos to IHouse for their grand efforts in stimulating us to Connect, Learn, Grow.
 

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Student-Athletes: Win Over Employers With Your Experience!

I can’t tell you how many Division I student-athletes I have met who happen to mention that they “have no experience.” Some of these athletes have risen to the top of their sports and are training for the Olympics or are navigating professional sponsorship deals, while others are team captains, leading workout sessions, or simply red-shirting their first year. Every single one is practicing and competing at the highest collegiate level while balancing coursework and a myriad of other responsibilities.

No experience?

One of the best quotes that I heard from an employer on campus last year was that she loves to hire athletes because they “know how to lose,” a sentiment that has been shared again and again by other employers coming through the Career Center.

I get it- losing isn’t the highlight of your sport. In fact, there’s nothing more frustrating than devoting countless hours toward training and practice, only to come up short in a game, match or meet.

But, you pick yourself up and you work harder. If you’re doing it right, the loss energizes you. It’s not an obstacle, only an opportunity. You’ve learned how to move forward.

Persistence, drive, dedication.

Student-athletes balance an incredibly challenging schedule. In-season you are constantly practicing, traveling and competing. You are surrounded by your teammates more often than you aren’t, and you maintain a tight schedule for classwork and other extracurriculars. Off-season you are training, working out, monitoring health, and trying to fit in what you can while you have just a bit more free time.

Time management, goal-setting, work ethic.

You push yourself physically and mentally. You wake up early to work out. You lead practices. You exemplify the power of a positive attitude and you contribute everything you have. Sometimes, you need your teammates to help you get to the next level. You work together.

Leadership, teamwork, communication.

Student-athletes tend to say that they “have no experience” when it comes time to start thinking about internship or job searches, writing a resume and cover letter, or interviewing for positions and opportunities off the field. They compare their years at Duke to those of their peers. They tend to see what they don’t have, instead of what they do.

What many student-athletes often overlook are the skills that they are gaining on a daily basis through their sport. To compete in Division I athletics, especially at Duke, student-athletes need to take both their sport and their academics seriously. They must be competitive, goal-oriented and have a strong work ethic. They know what it takes to achieve and they know how to problem-solve when something doesn’t go quite right. They know how to work within a team and they know both how to lead and how to follow. They know how to take initiative, set goals and to follow-through. They know how to recover from challenge and how to work toward achievement.

Many of the skills listed here have probably come naturally, as they’ve been both an ingredient and product of competing in high-level athletics. Most likely, you have all of these skills and you may have taken them for granted as you’ve focused on more immediate goals ahead.

Together, this compilation of skills is not only “experience,” but an incredible collection of experiences. As you think about your possible career path and your next steps, reflect on your time as an athlete. How will you tell your story? Where have you succeeded, and where have you failed? What have you learned? What makes you unique from your classmates and your teammates? What can you bring to a new environment?

Your time as a student-athlete is one of great value. Reflect upon your experience, identify what you’ve gained and the impact that you’ve made, and start telling your story. Employers LOVE to hear about your ability to solve problems, work hard, contribute to a team and recover from challenges. They love to hear your success stories, and the skills you’ve developed and honed both on and off the field. Even more, they love to hear how you can bring these skills to a role at their company or organization.

As you look for opportunities beyond the field, arena, court, pool or track, remember how much experience you do have, and what it demonstrates about you as a candidate. Recognize and articulate the incredible value of your time as a student-athlete and you’ll keep on winning.

photo by Thomson20192

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