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Faculty & Staff

Fight BAC and Stay Well

 

Many of us have had it.  That feeling in our stomachs that doesn’t bode well, the cramps and the wave of nausea that we know is coming.   That feeling is usually caused by some unwanted bacteria, a virus or even toxins from something being off in the food that we ate. Food safety is a national concern addressing a range of issues from ethical treatment of animals to antibiotic resistant bacteria, GMOS etc.,  but most commonly it refers to reducing risk of food borne illness.  48 million Americans report foodborne illness each year which results in 128,000 hospitalizations per year and 3,000 deaths per year.


How do we fight BAC (bacteria)?  There are four basic things you can do:


1) Wash your hands before eating (sing two verses of happy birthday before rinsing off soap),
2) Ensure that food is stored at an appropriate temperature (below 40 ° F and above 140 °F),
3) Cook your food well and separate chicken and meat from other foods in preparation to avoid cross contamination. 
4)  Know how long to keep your food. Out of fear of eating something “bad”, we tend to throw out a lot of food, not knowing how long it will keep – past that expiration or sell by date. In an attempt to reduce risk of food borne illness and reduce food waste, the USDA has developed a new app which answers that age old question of “how long can I keep foods before I need to toss them out”. The app is called the “Food Keeper”.


I have to admit, for someone who isn’t a big app user, I downloaded this one as well. – it’s definitely a keeper.

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Announcement of Nominees and Recipients

Congratulations to the following students, organizations, faculty and staff, who have been recognized for their leadership and service!
Mark your calendar: award recipients and nominees will be celebrated at IN THE SPOTLIGHT on April 16, 2015, at 4 pm at the Arts Annex. The event is open to the Duke community.

Betsy Alden Outstanding Service-Learning Awards
Recipients:

Trish Ike
Laxmi Rajak
Nominees:
Jamie Bergstrom
Emma DeVries
Trish Ike
Rosie Nowhitney
Anthony Olawo
Laxmi Rajak
Lauren Taylor

Baldwin Scholars Unsung Heroine Award
Recipient:

Dr. Suzanne Shanahan
Nominees:
Jessica Alvarez
Hope Arcuri
Zeena Bhakta
Nourhan Elsayed
Jaclyn Grace
Farzain Rahman
Dr. Suzanne Shanahan
Gloria Tomlinson

Lars Lyon Volunteer Service Award
Recipient:

Ileana Astorga
Nominees:
Ileana Astorga
Jennifer Garand
Quinn Holmquist
Quang Nguyen
Alice Reed
Corey Vernot

Student Org Line-Up
Recipients:

Headliners
Black Student Alliance 
Environmental Alliance
Muslim Student Association

Up & Comers
Black Women's Association
Blue Devils United
Camp Kesem of North Carolina
Duke International Relations Association
International Association
Le Bump
Sigma Gamma Rho
Students of the Caribbean Association

Star Advisor Award
Recipients:

J'nai Adams
Alec Greenwald
Mehdi Emamian
Kearsley Stewart
Nominees:
Tearria Beck-Scott
LB Bergene
Joan Clifford
Liraz Cohen
Leslie Digby
Courtnry Fauntleroy
Peter Feaver
Deona Hatley
Debbie Lo Biondo
Sean Palmer
John Rawls
Kathy Shipp
Allison Shumar
Adam Tomasiello
Xiao-fan Wang
Marianne Wardle
Jerrica Washington
Kristin Wright
Bin Yin

Julie Anne Levey Memorial Leadership Award
Recipients:

Luke Duchemin
Aishu Ramamurthi
Priya Sarkar
Amir Williams
Nominees:
Drake Breeding
Luke Duchemin
Kimberly Eddleman
Chinmay Pandit
Aishwarya Ramamurthi
Riley Rearson
Priya Sarkar
Sarah Turner
Shadman Uddin
Moses Wayne
Amir Williams

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award 
Recipient:

Rasheed Alhadi
Nominees:
Rasheed Alhadi
Emily Du
Leena El-Sadek
Thomas Fitzpatrick
Lucas Metropulos
Simardeep Nagyal
Bailey Sincox

Class of 2018 Awards
Recipients:

Advocacy Award
Tionne Barmer
Olivia Bowles
Taylor Jones
Chandler Phillips

Innovation Award
Canyon Dell'Omo

Raul Buelvas Award
Andrea Lin

Service Award
Michaela Stith

Spirit Award
Jonathan Osei

William J. Griffith University Service Award

Outstanding Contributions to the Duke Community
Recipients:
Jonathan Hill-Rorie
Jennifer Moreno
Lauren Reuter
Nominees:
Elisa Berson
Jaclyn Grace
Jonathan Hill Rorie
Tiffany Lieu
Jennifer Moreno
Lauren Reuter
David Robertson

Outstanding Contributions to the Durham and Local Community
Recipients:

Catherine Blebea
Cecelia Mercer
Nominees:
Catherine Blebea
Raisa Chowdhury
Joshua Latner
Cecelia Mercer
Amy Trey

Outstanding Contributions to the Global Community
Recipients:

Lucas Metropulos
Titilayo Shodiya

Student Affairs Distinguished Leadership and Service Award

Building Alliances through Collective Engagement
Recipient:

Jaclyn Grace
Nominees:
Jaclyn Grace
Stefanie Engert

Commitment to Diversity
Recipients:

Daniel Kort
Karina Santellano
Nominees:
Zeena Bhakta
Charlotte Ke
Daniel Kort
Jennifer Moreno
Karina Santellano

Respect for Community
Recipient:

Lizete Dos Santos
Nominees:
Catherine Blebea
Lizete Dos Santos
Jenna Lanz
Lucas Metropulos

Expanding the Boundaries of Learning
Recipient:

James Tian


#GotCaughtLeading
Recipients:

Umer Ahmed
Rasheed Alhadi
Abena Ansah-Yeboah
Anika Ayyar
Sebastian Baquerizo
Elizabeth Barahona
Evan Bell
Zeena Bhakta
Eeshan Bhatt
Erin Butrico
Nur Cardakli
Leah Catotti
Pim Chuaylua
James de Giorgio
Anita Desai
Stephen DiMaria
Rinzin Dorjee
Leena El-Sadek
Noura Elsayed
Mina Ezikpe
Nicolena Farias-Eisner
Jeff Feng
Riyanka Ganguly
Gabriela Gomez
Yossra Hamid
Katie Hammond
Jonathan Hill-Rorie
Samantha Holmes
Rebecca Holmes
Kathy Hong
Trish Ike
Sydney Jeffs
Teresa Ju
Safa Kaleem
Anna Kaul
Joe Kreitz
Michael Laskowitz
Anna Li
Lin Liao
Grace Lim
Leo Lou
Yvonne Lu
Chloe McLain
Jackson Moore
Eliza Moreno
Manish Nair
Brittany Nanan
Lauren Nathan
Quang Nguyen
Cam-Ha Nguyen
Vinai Oddiraju
Ogechi Onyeka
Chandler Phillips
Sania Rahim
Martin Ramirez
Shruti Rao
Dana Raphael
Zalika Sankara
Karina Santellano
Jordan Schermerhorn
Mali Shimojo
Sammi Siegel
Elliott Smith
Sri Sridharan
Sean Sweat
Carine Torres
Amir Williams
Jessica Witchger

WomC’s
Recipient:

Duke Support
Nominees:
WomC Campus Impact Award
Betsy Alden
Jessica Alvarez
Savanna Hershman
Shajuti Hossain
Eliza Moreno
Sania Rahim
Duke Support
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. 

WomC Community Impact Award
Recipient:

Imari Smith
Nominees:
Imari Smith
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. 

WomC State Impact Award
Recipient:

WomenNC 

WomC National Impact Award
Recipient:

Alissa Anderegg
Nominees:
Alissa Anderegg
Janie Long
Dana Raphael

WomC Global Impact Award
Recipient:

Korrine Cook

Nominees:
Korrine Cook
Kendall Covington
Risa Pieters

For more details, visit
http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ucae/leadership/leadership-service-awards


 

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Student Health Services, Graduation, and Summer Health Fees

Congratulations to all graduating students!

The Student Health Fee for Spring Semester 2015 EXPIRES at 5:00 pm on Friday, May 15th. This means that all Duke students who have paid the Spring Fee can continue to utilize Student Health Services (SHS) through May 15th. Depending on your status at Duke, there are different rules that apply after that date. If you are:

Graduating on May 10th – After May 15th, you can no longer be seen as a patient at the SHC. You must find another source for health care. The only exception to this is if your SHC provider requests that you follow up for a condition for which you were seen prior to May 15th.

Taking summer classes at Duke – Students who are taking summer classes pay the Summer Health Fee each term.

            Summer Term I                        May 13 – June 25                    $121.00

            Summer Term II                      June 29 – August 9                  $121.00

            Summer Term I and II             May 13 – August 9                  $242.00

If you are taking classes for the first term or both terms, you can continue to utilize SHS uninterrupted. If you are taking classes during the second term only, you must elect to pay the first term health fee to be allowed to utilize SHS between May 15th and the start of the second summer term. Likewise, if you are only taking classes during the first term, you must elect to pay the second term health fee to continue to utilize SHS throughout the whole summer.

Not taking classes, but staying in the area – Students who will return to Duke for the Fall 2015 Semester but are not taking summer classes can elect to pay the Summer Health Fee, utilizing SHS uninterrupted between Spring and Fall Semesters.

Prescriptions, Refills:

Prescriptions can be renewed at the discretion of the prescribing provider for up to 30 days after graduation (e.g. June 10, 2015). After June 10th, only returning students can have prescriptions written or phoned in by SHS providers.

Medical Records:

Students may request that copies of their records be forwarded to other providers. Appropriate release will be required. For more information, visit our website:  http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/studenthealth, click on Forms & Policies and look under the “Clinical Forms” section. Alternatively, you may call 919-681-9355 and press menu option 6.

Departments: 

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Jerry (Bei) Sun, 1994-2015

Jerry (Bei) Sun, a Duke University biology student, passed away Wednesday, March 4, from a rare form of cancer. Jerry was scheduled to graduate from Duke in 2016.

Duke flags were lowered to half-mast in his honor.

"Jerry loves every one of you," said Jerry's mother, Cathy Liu. "He appreciated all the help the Duke community gave him. Although he may not have been in contact with you during the past few months, I know Jerry missed all of you very much!"

Jerry first came to Duke as a high school student at North Carolina School of Science and Math in Durham to do an independent study project in the Center for Biomedical and Tissue Engineering. The lab became an important part of his life at Duke.

"Jerry came to us as a talented student with a deep interest in science. He was curious and bright, and learned complex materials quickly," said Jun Chen, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery, who oversaw his work both as a high school student, and subsequently as a Duke student beginning in the fall of 2012. "Jerry worked and thought creatively, and his contributions were equivalent to those of a junior graduate student."

Jerry was diagnosed with a germ cell tumor this past spring. During his treatment, he expressed great thanks and wonder at the support he received from his friends and family.

"You guys... I don't know even know where to begin," he wrote in a recent Facebook post. "I left my inbox alone for a day and it completely exploded. Thank you for the overwhelming support. Thank you for sharing my story. Thank you for your kind words. I've been humbled every step of the way by the kindness and support of the community around me."

"Jerry was the type of guy that you could trust your deepest secrets with and he would never tell a soul," said Lucy Ma, a close friend. "We talked about classes, friends, lab work, relationships. He was great at giving advice and maintaining an objective perspective. He was dedicated to his friends, academics, and family. I miss him dearly."

Jerry is survived by his parents, Jingli Sun and Chunying Liu; a younger sister, Lily May Sun; paternal grandmother, Sulan Xia; maternal grandmother, Zhilan Cui and maternal grandfather, Yixun Liu. He was preceded in death by his paternal grandfather, Huaide Sun.

Services will be held Saturday, March 14. at 2 p.m. at Chinese Christian Mission Church, 4528 Bennett Memorial Road in Durham.

Memorial contributions may be made online to Duke Cancer Institute through https://www.gifts.duke.edu (in memory of Jerry Bei Sun).

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Count calories? Maybe it’s better if we don’t.

It’s ironic that at a time when new legislation will demand that restaurants (having more than 20 locations), and vending machines (anyone owning more than 20) will have to disclose calorie and nutrition information, we are also learning that counting calories might be counterproductive to addressing the obesity epidemic in this country.

It’s not rocket science to figure out that calorie counting might not be working – it’s been done for years and look where it got us. Believe me, I realize that our obesity epidemic is not just about calorie counting: obesity is actually very complex, we always just want to over simplify it by bringing it back to calories in and calories out.  We now know that the source of calories consumed have different effects metabolically in our bodies.    

There are times where calorie counting may be beneficial; such as to offer perspective on energy intake, when someone has no idea of how much they are eating. Our food label information, for instance, is currently based on a 2000 calorie diet and for many this means very little. Perhaps counting calories for a day might assist in increasing awareness of how our intake compares.  However, that is more or less where it ends. Counting calories, or counting nutrient values for that matter, diminishes the food we eat to a numeric value.  Inherently that removes the pleasure, joy and satisfaction we derive from eating only to have it replaced with worry, guilt and an overall unsatisfying dining experience.  If you look at countries that are not struggling with weight issues, or hadn’t until recently, it’s not because they’ve been counting calories all these years.  Perhaps it is because they eat food and not nutrients, they appreciate the flavor, color, texture and origins of the food that they are eating and enjoy the company of the people they are eating with. It’s really not about calories, it’s about balance, and it’s just taking us a little longer to realize that.

Departments: 

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Love Is A Verb, a screening and discussion

Love Is A Verb is an examination of a social movement of Sufi inspired Sunni Muslims that began in Turkey in the l960s and now reaches across the globe. The group is called Hizmet, the Turkish word for service or The Gulen Movement after its inspiration, leader and beloved teacher Fethullah Gulen, a man that Time Magazine named as one of the most influential leaders in the world in 2013.

Kenneth Hunter, Executive Producer and Hakan Berberoglu, Co-Producer will be present for a screening and Q&A for this new documentary on the Gulen Movement on ​Tuesday, January 13th @6:00pm at Duke Bryan Center, Griffith Theater.

Presented by the Center for Muslim Life at Duke.

Read more about this documentary at www.loveisaverbmovie.com.

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Taking Advantage of Career Center Opportunities

The first week of my freshman year, I received some really important advice from a graduating senior that attended my high school. She told me “one of the best things about being a Duke student is all the opportunities the University has to offer you. It’s your job to take advantage of them.” As a graduating senior myself now, I’d like to think this has colored my Duke experience. I’ve had the opportunity to participate in service and academic engagement programs, attend and met numerous prominent campus figures, and travel abroad twice! I leave Duke confident I’ve made the most of my experience. 

But this advice didn’t only influence my approach to curricular and extra-curricular involvements. This advice was also indicative of my approach and experience with the Duke Career Center. When I was looking for a summer internship my sophomore year, I scheduled an appointment with a career counselor. Not having any idea of what I wanted to do, I went into the appointment feeling very lost. During my meeting I was told about all the opportunity seeking resources I could utilize to hone in on my interest, and connect with alumni in the field. Despite being a little overwhelmed at first, I got myself organized; I did my research, and dove right in.

My search began on DukeConnect; I was able to speak with several alumni to get more information on a variety of career paths I was interested in pursuing. I also submitted applications to various internship programs passed along to me through that initial appointment. I utilized the drop-in advising services to perfect all my resumes and cover letters. Ultimately, I was accepted to the INROADS program, which strives to place underrepresented students in the business industry. I received my first internship through the INROADS process with a pharmaceutical lobbying group. Through the program I was able to receive business and industry training, and interned with the company for two summers thereafter. My internships played a very large role in determining my career interests, and ultimately supported my decision to attend law school. However, I would have never known about the experience if I hadn’t taken advantage of the all the opportunities the Career Center offers to students.

Often times, Duke can seem like a daunting a place and the internship/job search can be as well. The sheer number of opportunities can be overwhelming. But that shouldn’t be a reason to shy away. Instead, in order to take make the most of your four years here, and as I was told my first week here “It’s your job to take advantage of them!”

Departments: 

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On the greatness of counseling

Let me be entirely honest and open in what I’m about to say. Honesty after all, is so little found in conversations about mental health and yet so powerful when it is. I have, like 1 in 4 other young people my age, struggled with my mental health on and off. There have been times when I’ve been sick with hopelessness and misery, consumed with self-loathing and hatred. Likewise, there have times when I’ve been ecstatically happy and grateful. My emotional health is a mental rollercoaster and contains the best and worst memories for me. But it is not all of me.

There was however, a point this semester when it got a little too much. I was exhausted with faking positivity to myself every day and pep-talking myself out of bed, throwing on smiles when all I wanted to do was cry. My sense of self-worth was at an all time low and life at Duke seemed unbearably overwhelming. I made an appointment at CAPS. It was not the first time. I had talked to woman once my freshmen year, when things had gotten particularly stressful. There seemed however, a difference to me between a one-time chat and regularly seeing a counselor with the intention of understanding yourself. And I decided that I was tired of having the emotional lows but no real answers. I was tired of believing in untruths about myself that led me to think in despairing ways.

So I decided to sign myself into regular counseling sessions. It was both frightening and liberating. A part of me was angry and afraid that I needed help in the first place – what was wrong with me? Another part of me was relieved because, for the first time, there was another option, one that validated my emotions instead of dismissing them.

I’m about five sessions in now, and I think going into counseling has been one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. It has surprised me and taught me how little I really knew about myself. If anything, it’s been an independent study in my own persona, to work out how I react to situations and why I react that way. This is information I feel that anyone young and uncertain can use because it has yielded insights richer than I could have hoped. How much do we really think about our ways of coping? Or whether the way we see ourselves is accurate? Or whether we need, sometimes, to catch ourselves when we self-hate and reassess the situation?

Counseling is not simply lying on a couch and talking about how you feel, like every film Hollywood makes. It’s an intimate leap into your own mind and it’s uncomfortable sometimes and it’s confronting. It’s shown me how little I truly know about myself, and helped me determine my values and priorities. It’s showing me slowly how to be happier. And it’s great.

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Ms. Trezza’s Kindergarten Class, Fall 1999

About Me! Worksheet

I found this worksheet at the back of my closet a few days before I left for college in Fall 2012.  Aside from a slightly better understanding of spelling, nothing much had changed in thirteen years, particularly my aspiration of becoming a doctor.  So, when I arrived at Duke, I was eager to start on the pre-med journey.  I, along with 300 other freshmen, excitedly (and naïvely, as I now know that nothing good can happen for me on Science Drive) walked up the long flight of stairs to Gross Chem to attend Chem 101.

As you may have realized already, I quickly found out that the long flight of stairs to what I thought would be an introduction to my career as a doctor was actually the flight of stairs to doom.  I learned that I couldn’t form any type of bond, covalent or ionic (get it?), with this class.  While my classmates were busy completing reaction equations and others sorts of smart chemistry things that I didn’t understand, I was busy flailing my arms in despair at the thought of continuing to take confusing classes that I was not passionate about for the next four years of my life.  I realized that I would have to look beyond my lifelong dream of being a doctor in search of something different.

Fast forward to present day, and I am now two years older, wiser, and an Economics major (so maybe not THAT wise).  Unlike freshman Lauren, I now have absolutely no idea what I want to do in the future.  I worked up a sweat running around the career fair as I stopped at every booth in every industry, from retail to banking, and I’ve spent many hours talking to whoever happens to be sitting next to me (to the freshman on the C1 two weeks ago: I’m sorry if I scared you) about the giant question mark that is my future.  Luckily, that person who’s sitting next to me has also become members of the staff at the Career Center, who are always there to listen to my latest debacles in my career search before reassuring me that whenever one door closes, another one opens.  I’ve found that it’s important to not be afraid of new opportunities and possibilities.  What I may want to do might be completely different from every other Economics major, but it’s also completely okay to try something new.  The most important thing about my choice is that it is something that I will enjoy, and as long as I am confident in my choice, success—and more importantly, happiness—will naturally follow.

Departments: 

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Student Health Closed for Thanksgiving

The Student Health Center will be closed for Thanksgiving beginning at 12:30pm on Wednesday, 11/26, and will re-open at 8:30am on Monday, December 1st.

For after-hours care, please call us at 919-681-9355.

Departments: 

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