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Graduate & Professional Students

Holiday Clinic Closings

The Student Health Center will be closed during the holidays according to the following schedule:

Friday, December 19th - Close at 10:30am

Saturday, December 20th - Closed

Closed for the Winter Break beginning on Wednesday, December 24th and extending through Sunday, January 4th.

For health care options during closed hours, please contact us at 919-681-9355.

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Taking Advantage of Career Center Opportunities

The first week of my freshman year, I received some really important advice from a graduating senior that attended my high school. She told me “one of the best things about being a Duke student is all the opportunities the University has to offer you. It’s your job to take advantage of them.” As a graduating senior myself now, I’d like to think this has colored my Duke experience. I’ve had the opportunity to participate in service and academic engagement programs, attend and met numerous prominent campus figures, and travel abroad twice! I leave Duke confident I’ve made the most of my experience. 

But this advice didn’t only influence my approach to curricular and extra-curricular involvements. This advice was also indicative of my approach and experience with the Duke Career Center. When I was looking for a summer internship my sophomore year, I scheduled an appointment with a career counselor. Not having any idea of what I wanted to do, I went into the appointment feeling very lost. During my meeting I was told about all the opportunity seeking resources I could utilize to hone in on my interest, and connect with alumni in the field. Despite being a little overwhelmed at first, I got myself organized; I did my research, and dove right in.

My search began on DukeConnect; I was able to speak with several alumni to get more information on a variety of career paths I was interested in pursuing. I also submitted applications to various internship programs passed along to me through that initial appointment. I utilized the drop-in advising services to perfect all my resumes and cover letters. Ultimately, I was accepted to the INROADS program, which strives to place underrepresented students in the business industry. I received my first internship through the INROADS process with a pharmaceutical lobbying group. Through the program I was able to receive business and industry training, and interned with the company for two summers thereafter. My internships played a very large role in determining my career interests, and ultimately supported my decision to attend law school. However, I would have never known about the experience if I hadn’t taken advantage of the all the opportunities the Career Center offers to students.

Often times, Duke can seem like a daunting a place and the internship/job search can be as well. The sheer number of opportunities can be overwhelming. But that shouldn’t be a reason to shy away. Instead, in order to take make the most of your four years here, and as I was told my first week here “It’s your job to take advantage of them!”

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Eat to Remember and Remember to Eat

The semester is rapidly coming to an end, and we all know what that means……. yup, time to study for finals. Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could offer you some secret eating tips to help boost your memory? Well we don’t have any magic formulas but we do have some good advice.

Think Healthy Fats

There is strong evidence that the same anti-inflammatory properties that help protect your heart can improve memory. These fats include fatty fish like salmon and tuna, nuts/seeds, avocado, olive oil and flax.

Where to find them on campus*:

·         Try the guacamole on your burrito bowl at Penn

·         Look for salmon and tuna or other fish on café menus  (Div café offers a salmon wrap, Café DeNovo offers a Tuna Nicoise salad, Penn serves salmon at dinner frequently, Perk has a salmon salad)

·         Add avocado or hummus to sandwiches and salads (ABP and other cafés)

·         Snack on nuts (available in the Lobby Shop, Quenchers and The East Campus Store), sprinkle sunflower seeds on your salad at salad bars

·         Pick up some individual containers of peanut butter and some fruit  for a healthy energizing snack

·         Try a grab and go hummus snack plate which is found at many cafés on campus

Devour Dark Fruits and Veggies

Fruits like blueberries, strawberries and dark green veggies like spinach, broccoli and collards are full of phytonutrients (dark greens include vitamin E and folate) with memory boosting properties.

Where to Find On Campus*:                            

·         Fruit cups are widely available at grab and go locations , also check out the fruit bar at Quenchers

·         Look for spinach and other dark greens at salad bars and as side dishes in many cafés

·         Add broccoli to your stir fry

Enjoy Whole Grain Goodness

Whole grains like oatmeal, quinoa, brown rice, etc. are an integral part of an anti-inflammatory diet like the Mediterranean diet. This type of diet plan promotes increased blood flow to the brain and has been linked to improved memory.

Where to Find on Campus*:

·         Look for whole grain salads at salad bars around campus

·         Many cafés have whole grain side dishes

·         Choose whole grain breads for sandwiches and create a satisfying breakfast with some oatmeal (Marketplace, Penn, Café Edens, Div  Café, ABP just to name a few)

 

Remember we don’t eat nutrients in isolation so for best results include these foods as part of a healthy eating pattern and remember to eat regularly throughout the day and stay hydrated.

Good luck and Happy Holiday eating.

*The cafes listed are only a sample of where you may find these foods on campus.  For a more thorough list refer to The Devil’s Advocate.

 

 

 

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On the greatness of counseling

Let me be entirely honest and open in what I’m about to say. Honesty after all, is so little found in conversations about mental health and yet so powerful when it is. I have, like 1 in 4 other young people my age, struggled with my mental health on and off. There have been times when I’ve been sick with hopelessness and misery, consumed with self-loathing and hatred. Likewise, there have times when I’ve been ecstatically happy and grateful. My emotional health is a mental rollercoaster and contains the best and worst memories for me. But it is not all of me.

There was however, a point this semester when it got a little too much. I was exhausted with faking positivity to myself every day and pep-talking myself out of bed, throwing on smiles when all I wanted to do was cry. My sense of self-worth was at an all time low and life at Duke seemed unbearably overwhelming. I made an appointment at CAPS. It was not the first time. I had talked to woman once my freshmen year, when things had gotten particularly stressful. There seemed however, a difference to me between a one-time chat and regularly seeing a counselor with the intention of understanding yourself. And I decided that I was tired of having the emotional lows but no real answers. I was tired of believing in untruths about myself that led me to think in despairing ways.

So I decided to sign myself into regular counseling sessions. It was both frightening and liberating. A part of me was angry and afraid that I needed help in the first place – what was wrong with me? Another part of me was relieved because, for the first time, there was another option, one that validated my emotions instead of dismissing them.

I’m about five sessions in now, and I think going into counseling has been one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. It has surprised me and taught me how little I really knew about myself. If anything, it’s been an independent study in my own persona, to work out how I react to situations and why I react that way. This is information I feel that anyone young and uncertain can use because it has yielded insights richer than I could have hoped. How much do we really think about our ways of coping? Or whether the way we see ourselves is accurate? Or whether we need, sometimes, to catch ourselves when we self-hate and reassess the situation?

Counseling is not simply lying on a couch and talking about how you feel, like every film Hollywood makes. It’s an intimate leap into your own mind and it’s uncomfortable sometimes and it’s confronting. It’s shown me how little I truly know about myself, and helped me determine my values and priorities. It’s showing me slowly how to be happier. And it’s great.

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CSGD Welcomes New Director

Bernadette Brown has been named the new director of the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity (CSGD) at Duke.

“She brings strong management skills, expertise in LGBTQ issues, theories and perspectives,” said Zoila Airall, who oversees CSGD as VP of Campus Life for Student Affairs at Duke. “Her colleagues describe her as someone they will miss because of her encyclopedic mind, engaging sense of humor and commitment to social justice issues.”

Throughout the Fall semester, “Queering Duke History” has commemorated a turbulent 50 years of LGBT life and progress on campus. Brown’s arrival on Jan. 5 will be an integral part of the next chapter of this story.

“Duke has a very interesting social justice trajectory, especially pertaining to race, cisgender women, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression (SOGIE). The LGBTQI community here, in particular, has a rich history,” Brown said. “CSGD, the LGBTQI undergraduate and graduate student groups, the LGBT Task Force and the LGBT Alumni Network all have had, and will continue to have, a profoundly beneficial impact on the lives of the LGBTQI community at Duke and beyond.”

Brown has dedicated much of her professional career to advancing social justice, with particular emphasis on those who exist outside the heteronormative and/or transgress gender roles. Most recently with the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, she has been co-managing the “Improving Permanency for LGBT Youth” project that works to improve stability for LGBTQI youth in the child welfare and juvenile justice system in California.

“My work is really about facilitating interpersonal and institutional relationships that will create equity and inclusivity for the LGBTQI community, and doing this with an intersectional lens so that none of our identities (e.g., race or ethnicity, SOGIE, religion, immigration status, socioeconomic status, veteran status, physical and/or mental abilities) are ignored,” Brown said

Stephanie Helms Pickett, director of Duke’s Women’s Center, met with Brown during the lengthy interview process. “I found Bernadette to be excited about building upon the foundation and powerful history of the work of the Center through engaging with the community,” Helms Pickett said. “Personally, I am excited about the depth and expertise I believe she will bring to the Campus Life team.”

The excitement Helms Pickett refers to comes through in Brown’s own words. “I'm tremendously excited about working with everyone to continue this work and explore new paths to promote and support LGBTQI inclusion,” Brown said. “Many LGBTQI students come here struggling with accepting their SOGIE, some are trying to determine if they are going to be "out" with respect to their SOGIE, some are dealing with family conflict around their SOGIE, and some are trying to reconcile their religious and/or political beliefs with their SOGIE. The same is true for many of Duke's faculty and staff. These are serious concerns and CSGD is here to support them as they move through this journey.”

Brown comes to Duke from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency in Oakland, California, where she focused on LGBT youth and welfare within the juvenile justice system. She has held numerous positions around the country focusing on social justice for a variety of communities. Brown holds a juris doctorate from Boston University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from Columbia University. She has conducted numerous trainings and presentations on social justice and the LGBT community, including LGBTI Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) trainings for The National PREA Resource Center, a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, for those seeking to become certified PREA auditors by the US Department of Justice. Brown was raised in Detroit. She has one son, and is obsessed with gargoyles, which is yet another reason she can’t wait to get to Duke.

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Burger Blog?

You’ve come to the right place, yes, this is the nutrition blog.  It may seem like a juxtaposition that a dietitian is writing about burgers, but a good burger is one of my favorite things to eat.  A local burger joint recently posted that they were having a Thanksgiving contest.  One and all were welcomed to enter the contest for the best themed burger.  The plan was for judges to choose the top 3 recipes and then taste test to pick the winner.  Rules of the competition were that it had to be a turkey burger and include cranberries, sweet potatoes, stuffing or all 3.  As I enjoy cooking and a challenge, I decided to enter.

I have to admit that I generally do not choose a turkey burger over a beef burger.  If a turkey burger is not made correctly, it can be a dry hockey puck.  So I knew that I had to give some love to the patty itself for my entry.  I didn’t want to include stuffing, as I already had carbohydrates in the bun and the sweet potato fries that came on the side.  To capture the flavor of stuffing (I do realize some of y’all may call it “dressing” but it’s stuffing in my house), I took the prominent spices, sage and thyme, and mixed it into the meat.  Thanksgiving turkey must have cranberry sauce, so I also incorporated dried cranberries into the meat mixture.  Using light and dark ground turkey instead of ground turkey breast without the skin helped with the moisture factor.  To further invoke tastes of the annual meal, I topped my burger with gravy.  In a nod to green bean casseroles around the country, I also added fried onions to it along with Brie.

I enjoyed being creative with the recipe and didn’t think much of my entry after the fact so you can imagine my surprise when I saw that not only did my burger make it into the taste testing round, but that I was the winner!  There were over 30 entries so I was pretty shocked.  The recipe was featured as the special for the day so my husband and close friends stopped by to grab one.  Luckily, we got there just in time as they ran out after we ordered.  Even my boss texted me to say that she was able to get one and really liked it.

Now for the nutrition part!  I didn’t have many non-starchy vegetables on my plate at this meal.  For me, this evokes the 80/20 rule.  If 80% of my meals are balanced, my body will be just fine when 20% are less balanced.  As for turkey versus beef?  If you choose ground turkey breast without the skin, it has less saturated fat.  Both options are high in other nutrients, too.  Turkey is a source of niacin, selenium, vitamin B6, phosphorus and zinc while beef is a source these as well as vitamin B12 and iron.

Whatever you choose, know that eating should be not only about meeting your nutrient needs, but also include items you enjoy.  For this nutritionist, that includes an occasional burger.

 

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Student Health Closed for Thanksgiving

The Student Health Center will be closed for Thanksgiving beginning at 12:30pm on Wednesday, 11/26, and will re-open at 8:30am on Monday, December 1st.

For after-hours care, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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What I Learned from the SNAP Challenge

Four dollars.  On Duke’s campus, that could get you a single bowl of soup at the Loop.  Most of us spend far more than four dollars on each meal we eat, with Duke’s minimum meal plan allotting $20 per day.  However, for a great number of North Carolinians, four dollars is all they have to feed themselves each and every day.  Four dollars is the daily allowance given by North Carolina’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, also formerly known as Food Stamps.  In the month of October in Durham County alone, over 44,000 individuals were utilizing SNAP.  Hunger and concern for where one’s next meal will come from is a daily reality for too many. 

 

To shed light on how challenging it can be to eat on so restricted a budget, I chose to participate in the Duke SNAP Challenge, hosted this past Wednesday through Friday by UCAE.  Armed with my $12, I started my challenge at Harris Teeter, knowing there’d be no way to feed myself on food points with so little.  Despite not having much to spend, that trip to the grocery store was one of the longest I’ve taken in a while.  Instead of mindlessly browsing the aisles, sipping my Starbucks and throwing whatever looked good into my cart, I spent over an hour scouring the weekly coupon flyer and scanning the shelves for special savings offers.  I stood in front of the canned goods for over five minutes, adding together different totals in my head to find the best deal.  I circled through the store at least twice, having to take some things back out of my basket to stay under budget and sadly avoiding the fresh produce section in favor of the quantity I could purchase in boxes and cans.  At the register, I ended up with a large container of oatmeal, two bags of frozen vegetables, three bananas, two large cans of chicken, a jar of applesauce, two boxes of rice and beans mix, and 70 cents left over.  For the three days of the challenge, my single bag of groceries allowed me a banana and a bowl of oatmeal for breakfast each morning and a serving of veggies with a bowl of beans, rice, and chicken for each lunch and dinner.  In between meals, I snacked occasionally out of my applesauce jar. 

 

By Friday evening I was in no way starving, but after three days of eating the same three, simple meals, I couldn’t help but think of the variety I would be able to indulge in over the weekend after the challenge was over.  I quickly caught myself though as I remembered that what I was treating as a 72-hour “challenge” is a reality that over 1.5 million North Carolinians face 365 days out of the year.  While I pile up my veggies in the salad bar line at Penn and swipe my DukeCard at the register without even asking about my total, thousands of families are struggling to put a meal on the table for dinner, let alone three daily nutritious and balanced ones.  It’s so easy to fall into the habits of mindless consumption and instant gratification, taking for granted the convenience and variety of food we have surrounding us at Duke.  We are quick to grumble about the ABP sandwich line but we fail to recognize that it’s a privilege just to be able to satisfy an afternoon snack craving, that the latte so many of us have consumed before 9am costs more than what a fellow Durhamite might be able to spend on food all day.  We’re constantly complaining to one another about how much stress we’re under with all of our exams and final papers, but imagine adding to that the stress of meticulously pinching every penny just to afford lunch, of getting nervous every time you approach the register because maybe you’ll have to leave the line to put something back, of not being able to focus on your work because your stomach is growling but eating is not an option. 

 

I’ll be the first to shamefully admit that I fall into these habits and make these complaints all too regularly.  I also know my mere participation in the SNAP challenge does nothing to change the face of hunger in North Carolina or the daily lived realities of SNAP enrollees.  It’s what happens now that the challenge is over that matters – approaching my meals with more mindfulness and gratitude, trying harder to eliminate my food waste, spending my food points more sparingly so I can also buy food to donate to Durham’s local food pantries and soup kitchens.  As we approach the holiday season, a time that too often celebrates consumption over concern for others, I would invite all of you to do your own SNAP challenge.  Or even better, volunteer to take action against hunger in Durham or your hometown.  At the very least, challenge yourself to be more mindful and thankful – so when you go to post that foodstagram of your Thanksgiving plate with your #blessed caption, think twice about how fortunate we truly are.  

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Student Health Closing Early 11/20

The Student Health Center will close at 3:45pm on Thursday, 11/20. We will re-open with normal operating hours at 8:30am on Friday, 11/21.

For after hours care, please call us at 919-681-9355. 

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