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Holiday Clinic Closings

The Student Health Center will be closed during the holidays according to the following schedule:

Friday, December 19th - Close at 10:30am

Saturday, December 20th - Closed

Closed for the Winter Break beginning on Wednesday, December 24th and extending through Sunday, January 4th.

For health care options during closed hours, please contact us at 919-681-9355.

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Student Health Closed for Thanksgiving

The Student Health Center will be closed for Thanksgiving beginning at 12:30pm on Wednesday, 11/26, and will re-open at 8:30am on Monday, December 1st.

For after-hours care, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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Student Health Closing Early 11/20

The Student Health Center will close at 3:45pm on Thursday, 11/20. We will re-open with normal operating hours at 8:30am on Friday, 11/21.

For after hours care, please call us at 919-681-9355. 

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Duke Common Experience, Class of 2019

Nominations are now being accepted for the Class of 2019 Duke Common Experience. As a piece of the coming changes to Orientation this summer, we have decided to enhance our Summer Reading program. While we will still have a book the incoming class will read, there will be a variety of programs connected to the book both during the summer and over the course of the fall semester. These will include:

  • ​Virtual content sharing of key themes and ideas over the summer months
  • Connection with Alumni Affairs in reading the selection
  • Speakers and programs during the year connected to the selection
  • One over-arching theme that connects the selection to programs here at Duke during the year

However, the biggest change is the format for hosting the author and discussion about the book and what we seek to do over the summer.

When students come to campus, instead of relying solely on FAC chats, our plan it to co-host a program at DPAC. We are excited about this new programming opportunity and see it as a chance to enhance our current DPAC program, add to the intellectual experience of the summer reading, and allow us to choose different types of books that can then be highlighted and/or performed for the incoming class.

As a reminder, the text selected for The Duke Common Experience is designed to give incoming students a shared intellectual connection with other members of their class. The selection committee who will choose the text is comprised of faculty, staff, and students.
In addition to being readable, enjoyable and engaging, the selection must:

  • Enrich the intellectual life of students
  • Promote a shared/common experience among first-year students
  • Prompt stimulating debate and lively discussion outside of the classroom
  • Foster interaction between and among peers

Suggestions for books can be made online at the fo​llowing website:
https://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dmsg2fhSFgUAHwV

Nominations will be taken through Friday, November 15th. Please feel free to suggest as many books as you'd like and pass along this message to students, faculty and other staff.

Thank you for your support of Duke's continual development of Orientation Week, the first year experience of our students and our collaboration with campus and community partners.

​Jordan Hale and Simon Partner
Co-Chairs, Duke Summer Reading Committee

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Not Insignificant

We had just wrapped up at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, drained from taking in all the incredible history exhibited in the museum’s three buildings. The consensus was to take the tram to a spot for lunch, then hop on it again to find a baklava shop we’d heard is amazing. The tram is one of several fantastic methods of public transportation used by what feels like everyone (at the same time) in the city of Istanbul. A seat on the bus, metro, or tram is a highly coveted spot that is not easily attained. In fact, sometimes just getting on any of these vehicles is a nearly impossible feat because they are so crowded. “Maximum Capacity” doesn’t seem to be a concept as firmly held here as it is in the U.S. As we approached the tram, desperately seeking nourishment after an exhausting outing of museum-going, we discovered hoards of other people on the platform who we would soon have to fight for a spot. The tram arrived and its doors opened, the poor passengers inside desperately trying to escape before being trampled by the masses boarding. Amidst this commotion, while trying to edge my way in without elbowing an elderly woman in the face, I felt a hand squeezing my butt. Suffering some sensory overload from the experience of getting on the tram, it took me a few seconds to realize this was happening, and to notice that the hand had not let go. When I did finally realize, I whipped around—no easy task when one has no more than a half-inch radius of personal space around her—and attempted to identify to whom the brazen hand belonged. My friend had witnessed this all go down, and pointed to a short, middle-aged man in a blue dress shirt and grey slacks who was holding a briefcase. He had turned to face the door, but looked over his shoulder a few times at me as I glared at him and shared some choice words I wish I knew how to say in Turkish. Our stop came soon after my futile attempt to give him a piece of my mind, and he was quickly lost in the crowd of passengers exiting.

The incident, his subsequent looks of complete indifference at me as I uselessly berated him, and the absence of a reaction from any of the passengers nearby who’d also watched it all happen brought me to the disturbing realization that what I had just experienced was, in a word, insignificant. I felt violated and uncomfortable in my own skin. The members of our group did their best to console me, through belatedly cursing the perpetrator or sharing their own stories of being publicly groped by strangers. I was overwhelmed with fury, but social etiquette urged me to stifle my anger and attempt to distract myself until I could be alone and reflect.

I never thought I would feel more like a compilation of body parts, assembled solely for the purpose of being assessed, criticized, and used by men, than at a Duke fraternity party—until I came to Turkey. I was warned, of course. Both of my parents effectively told me to put my feminist identity on hold during my time in Turkey, reminding me constantly that my views would not be received well in a country whose deputy prime minister told women they shouldn’t laugh out loud in public. They and many others warned me that life would be different as an American woman in Turkey—especially one who does not look Turkish in the slightest—and I would be expected to adapt. I’m okay with adapting. I want to be challenged. I enjoy exploring beyond my comfort zone. Being transformed against my will into a walking piece of meat for men to invade with their stares and debase with their words, among other things, does not fall into any of those categories. Nor does being expected to accept it as normal.

Throughout my first month and a half here, I have already met several incredibly intelligent, outspoken, headstrong Turkish women whose respective brilliances inspire me. Simultaneously, I have seen how the day-to-day culture of male entitlement, especially as expressed through street harassment, treats these women and all women as disposable objects. My experience on the tram was insignificant—to be expected, even. Because, from my western point of view, if you identify as a woman in Turkey, you automatically forfeit the basic human right of being treated as an equal to someone who identifies as a man.

The realization that the previous sentence requires no “in Turkey” to be true is an incredibly uncomfortable truth to accept. The idea of women as objects—to be owned, to be used, to be disposed of, to be replaced—is certainly not unique to this country. As I mentioned, the most objectified I’ve ever felt prior to coming to Turkey is when in attendance at a frat party at Duke. I have realized how easy it is to sit on the high horse of a westernized perspective and criticize other countries for the inequalities they are enforcing and perpetuating. It is far more unsettling to recognize the fact that, though it may manifest itself in different ways, gender inequality is as much a constant in our society as it is anywhere else. Being violated by a stranger on the tram was a blatant reminder that I am living in a man’s world, a world in which my womanhood renders my rights, my experiences, and my value insignificant.

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Student Health Closed Saturday 10/11

The Student Health Center will be closed on Saturday, 10/11, for Fall Break. We will re-open with normal operating hours on Monday, October 13th, at 8:30am.

For after hours health care options, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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South’s Tastiest Town: Exploring Durham through Food - CLG serise at IHouse

When I decide to eat out, I often look for a restaurant that is not too far, clean, with relaxed ambience and friendly service staff. And, for me it should definitely offer vegetarian options. With my limited knowledge of local eateries, I can only come up with three options that I have tried – Chipotle, Dominos and Subway and I mostly do take-out. So, I hardly eat out. Oh! I and my family have had coffee outside. Want to know where? At the nearest gas station of course.

You must be thinking what a bland life I have been living. Not anymore. This Thursday’s workshop hosted by Annette Moore, IHouse has added spice and variety to my life. We were taken on a gastronomic journey covering the various food options in the “region’s new culinary capital”. Most of these restaurants can be reached by the Bull City Connector, “a Fare-Free route from Duke to Golden belt, including Ninth Street and Downtown Durham”. So, don’t worry if you don’t have a car.



In 2013, Durham ranked as the South’s Tastiest Town according to Southern Living magazine. Some of the things that make the Durham food scene unique are:

* Fusion of old with new: Some of the restaurants in Brightleaf Square were originally tobacco warehouses built in 1900’s.
* Seasonal, local organic ingredients
* Variety of options from Fine Dining to Quick Service, to satisfy your palate without emptying your wallet.

After a brief introduction, the participants got a chance to taste samples from local eateries like The Cupcake Bar, Dales Indian Cuisine, Monuts and Pizzeria Toro. Then, we played a game ‘Name that Restaurant’. You guessed it, I got only three answers right. While going over the answers, Annette gave us a brief idea about each restaurant, special foods they serve and also showed us some video clips. She peppered her presentation with snippets of information about the different restaurants. Overall, we had a feeling that we had visited about ten different restaurants (and a Food Truck Rodeo at Durham Central Park) in the course of the evening.

Want to know where Duke gourmets like to go? (Based on an online survey)

* Favorite place for coffee: Cocoa Cinnamon
* Top restaurant / bar / chill-out place: Full Steam
* Best dining place in Durham: Bull City Burger and Brewery

What better way to end the day than eating food and talking about food! From fine dining to food trucks, pizzas to paninis, sandwiches to samosas, gelato to gingerbread waffles, coffee to cupcakes, donuts to dumplings, outdoor seating to golf courses, breakfast to brunch, small plates to large portions, bakery to brewery, gluten-free to vegetarian, vegan – there is a restaurant in the Bull City to cater to every foodie. So go ahead and explore Durham’s celebrated cuisine at these restaurants.
 

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Student Health Closed on 9/1

The Student Health Center will be closed on Monday, 9/1, in observance of the Labor Day holiday.

We will re-open with normal operating hours on Tuesday, 9/2, at 8:30am.

For after-hours care and nurse advice, please call 919-681-9355.

 
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How to Eat Like a Healthy Devil

Welcome to Duke!

Whether you are a first year student away from home for the first time, or returning as an upperclassman and ready to explore your dining options on West, you might want some tips about how to eat well on campus. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Think of healthy eating as having three components, timing, balance and mindfulness.

1.       Timing. Remember to eat regularly throughout the day; you can’t expect to get through your busy days if you don’t have energy (and food is energy!). A common mistake many students make is skipping meals or going too many hours without eating. If you have the First Year Board plan don’t forget to eat a small meal or snack to keep you going between meals.  

If you are too hungry and faced with an “all you care to eat” meal option at dinner, you are likely to overeat. You might think you are getting your money’s worth, but your body will pay the price.

 

Think you are too busy to stop and eat? There are many options for grab and go meals and snacks on West campus or Trinity Café on East.

If you have time for a sit down meal midday that’s even better.  Check out your options here.

 

2.       Balance. Make sure to include some lean protein, veggies and/or fruit and whole grains at most meals. Balancing Your Plate will keep you on the right track to healthy eating, sustained energy and weight management.

 

3.       Mindfulness. Above all remember to eat when you are hungry and stop when you are comfortably full. Eating too little or too much will keep you thinking about food instead of focused on all the other things you want to do at Duke.

Eat what you like, get enough of it and get on with your day!

 

Have a great year!

 

Additional Resources:

Healthy Eating at Duke- it’s “Devilishly” Easy

Smart Snacking

Duke Student Health Nutrition

For more information on eating well at Duke meet with a Student Health Nutritionist

919-681-9355

 

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