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Undergraduates

Time to Rethink the Midnight Snack?

As a Duke student, I am no stranger to the late-night cram session the night before an exam, or the essay-writing marathon that stretches into the early morning hours.  For many of us in college, day and night have become flexible terms that more often than not misalign with being awake and being asleep.  When burning the midnight oil, we often crave a snack to keep us going through the night.  However, a recent study by the Salk Institute for Biological Studies (reviewed here in the NY Times) suggests that these late-night nibbles may be messing with our bodies’ internal clocks.

Published this past December in the journal Cell Metabolism, the study used mice to look at the relationships between meal times, weight gain, and overall health.  Mice were allowed to eat on two different schedules – one group had access to food all day long, while the other group of mice had access to food for only 9 or 12 hours per day.  The results showed that even though all of the mice consumed the same number of daily calories, those mice that only ate during the 9 to 12 hour window were healthier, gained less weight (some obese mice even lost weight), and had more lean muscle mass than the mice that ate all day long.

Scientists believe that the results seen in the mice may have significant implications for humans too.  Although the exact mechanism is still being researched further, this study hypothesizes that meal times affect the body’s circadian rhythms, even more so than dark and light cycles.   Circadian rhythms are our bodily processes that run on an approximately 24-hour cycle, and they affect how our genes work.  This study suggests that eating only within a 12-hour time window allows for our genes and metabolic pathways to synchronize and work together more effectively, keeping our bodies leaner and stronger.  While the old adage goes, “we are what we eat,” it may be more likely that “we are when we eat. “

This being said, it can be nearly impossible to avoid those midnight cravings all the time, so it’s important to be smart when choosing a late-night snack.  To give yourself a boost of fuel at any hour, pair a carbohydrate (fresh or dried fruit, whole grain crackers, veggies) with a protein source (yogurt, cheese, nuts, hummus) – check out this Smart Snacking resource for more ideas!  Also, be sure to feed yourself well and regularly during the day to meet your daily energy needs, so when nighttime rolls around, you’re still feeling satisfied and productive.  Your body and its clock will thank you!

      

 

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Recruitment Stats

The Interfraternity Council extended 467 bids to potential new members during 2015 formal recruitment, while the Panhellenic Association extended 355 bids.  This represents an increase in bids offered for both IFC and Panhel compared to the previous year.

 

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My life as the Fresh Pres(ident) of Bel Air

Coming to Edens, I was extremely nervous about how things would turn out. The majority of my dorm mates freshmen year were people I did not feel connected to, and my RA was usually MIA. More than that, people always talk about Edens as a sort of “black hole” of West Campus because of it being the farthest dorm from all the academic buildings and the Bryan Center. This less-than wonderful experience my freshman year led me to become involved in house council and become president.

Even with all this negative opinion surrounding the dorm, I can honestly say it has been an incredibly positive experience. Both RAs are extremely friendly and excited to foster a sense of community, and they make themselves available to everyone. Moreover, the small amount of people in the dorm makes it really easy to get to know other people in the dorm. Even the housekeepers have been incredibly friendly and welcoming! It doesn’t even matter that Edens is the farthest from the academic buildings and most of the West Campus facilities because the environment is so relaxed and open that it makes it easy to take the extra few minutes to reach my dorm.

In the semester that I’ve already spent here, we’ve had a Chipotle event, a DUI performance, a Finvite to the Durham Food Tour, and a trip to the DPAC to see an accapella group.  The best part about it is that, because it is an independent house, the people who go to these events all have different interests and involvements at Duke. There is an incredible artist in my hall, some lacrosse players who get really extreme when they play Ping-Pong with each other, and a guy who orders Grace’s Café for delivery almost every day.

There’s something incredibly comforting about the consistency of coming back from class and seeing the Grace’s delivery guy or hearing the pitter patter of the ping pong ball. As my RC said in an email the first week of classes in August, Edens really is “the hidden gem” of Duke. I love being part of this community and helping it grow as a community with my position.
 

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Count calories? Maybe it’s better if we don’t.

It’s ironic that at a time when new legislation will demand that restaurants (having more than 20 locations), and vending machines (anyone owning more than 20) will have to disclose calorie and nutrition information, we are also learning that counting calories might be counterproductive to addressing the obesity epidemic in this country.

It’s not rocket science to figure out that calorie counting might not be working – it’s been done for years and look where it got us. Believe me, I realize that our obesity epidemic is not just about calorie counting: obesity is actually very complex, we always just want to over simplify it by bringing it back to calories in and calories out.  We now know that the source of calories consumed have different effects metabolically in our bodies.    

There are times where calorie counting may be beneficial; such as to offer perspective on energy intake, when someone has no idea of how much they are eating. Our food label information, for instance, is currently based on a 2000 calorie diet and for many this means very little. Perhaps counting calories for a day might assist in increasing awareness of how our intake compares.  However, that is more or less where it ends. Counting calories, or counting nutrient values for that matter, diminishes the food we eat to a numeric value.  Inherently that removes the pleasure, joy and satisfaction we derive from eating only to have it replaced with worry, guilt and an overall unsatisfying dining experience.  If you look at countries that are not struggling with weight issues, or hadn’t until recently, it’s not because they’ve been counting calories all these years.  Perhaps it is because they eat food and not nutrients, they appreciate the flavor, color, texture and origins of the food that they are eating and enjoy the company of the people they are eating with. It’s really not about calories, it’s about balance, and it’s just taking us a little longer to realize that.

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CareerBeam: Interview Practice and More!

CareerBeam is a great online tool for anyone at any point of the career journey! It is available for Duke students of all years, undergraduate and graduate, that the Career Center servesCareerBeam has multiple tools to help you with different aspects of your career search.

  • Resume and Cover Letter Builders provide tips on how to tell your unique story throughout all of your application documents.
  • Five Self-Assessments help you begin to learn about yourself so that you can begin to search for careers and opportunities that would fit you best.
  • Industry Information Guides allow you to get the latest information and trends about any industry you’re interested in.
  • Top City Guides brings information about employment, population and other factors from cities around the US right to you.

I want to highlight two valuable tools that you can take advantage of right now.

Interview Prep
On the left-hand side of the home page, this link provides over 150 interview questions once you select the option “Interview Questions.”  When you click on “Interview Types and Examples,” you will see valuable tips on various interview formats including case, panel, phone and video interviews. 
Though these two functions were underscored, this comprehensive website has many more including resumes, cover letter, self-assessments, and tools for industry research.  To summarize, log in and see for yourself what it has to offer!
Login and Get on it!

Video Interview Preparation
Found on the bottom of the home page, this feature allows you to pick from over 250 questions and customize your own video interview.  There is nothing like seeing yourself on camera and being able to evaluate your interview skills to improve your techniques.  Take advantage of this opportunity to see your own nonverbal behaviors, rate of speaking and strength of responses to interview questions.  Then, schedule an interview prep appointment so we can help you improve! Call (919) 660-1050.

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Love Is A Verb, a screening and discussion

Love Is A Verb is an examination of a social movement of Sufi inspired Sunni Muslims that began in Turkey in the l960s and now reaches across the globe. The group is called Hizmet, the Turkish word for service or The Gulen Movement after its inspiration, leader and beloved teacher Fethullah Gulen, a man that Time Magazine named as one of the most influential leaders in the world in 2013.

Kenneth Hunter, Executive Producer and Hakan Berberoglu, Co-Producer will be present for a screening and Q&A for this new documentary on the Gulen Movement on ​Tuesday, January 13th @6:00pm at Duke Bryan Center, Griffith Theater.

Presented by the Center for Muslim Life at Duke.

Read more about this documentary at www.loveisaverbmovie.com.

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Greetings Duke Parents and Family Members!

Greetings Duke Parents and Family Members!

Welcome to the Class of 2019 Blue Devils! Our names are Beth Gabay, Dana Williams Dudley, and Penny Fleming. We are all representatives of the Duke Parents Advisory Council (DPAC). On behalf of DPAC, the Division of Student Affairs, and the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, we welcome you to our Duke family. We would like to invite you to join our Facebook “Group for Duke University Parents and Families” where you can feel free to ask questions, share news, and make comments. We are excited about being able to connect with you and share information from a parent perspective. We are sure that you will want to learn everything you can about Duke. We offer up-to-date information about campus events, alumni events, sports, technology, research opportunities, and student happenings.

We congratulate you on your children’s Early Decision acceptance to Duke! We know this is an exciting time and that your family will want to feel a part of the Duke community starting now. We are so thrilled that you chose Duke! We are a vibrant, engaging, and close-knit community. Duke is a research university with a liberal arts approach, and your children will have an academic experience like no other. We hope that you will start wearing your Duke Blue with pride and share your happiness with your family and friends. In the meantime, if you have any questions for parents of current students and alumni, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us through this site. Again, congratulations!

To join and connect with other parents visit: https://www.facebook.com/groups/592008527562180/

The group is closed, so you will have to request to join.

Or feel free to contact us via email: dukeparents@studentaffairs.duke.edu. We look forward to hearing from you!

Warm regards,

Beth Gabay, P’16
Dana Williams Dudley, P’17
Penny Fleming, P’09, P’10 (BSE, MS) P’12, P’13 (BSE, MEng)

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Taking Advantage of Career Center Opportunities

The first week of my freshman year, I received some really important advice from a graduating senior that attended my high school. She told me “one of the best things about being a Duke student is all the opportunities the University has to offer you. It’s your job to take advantage of them.” As a graduating senior myself now, I’d like to think this has colored my Duke experience. I’ve had the opportunity to participate in service and academic engagement programs, attend and met numerous prominent campus figures, and travel abroad twice! I leave Duke confident I’ve made the most of my experience. 

But this advice didn’t only influence my approach to curricular and extra-curricular involvements. This advice was also indicative of my approach and experience with the Duke Career Center. When I was looking for a summer internship my sophomore year, I scheduled an appointment with a career counselor. Not having any idea of what I wanted to do, I went into the appointment feeling very lost. During my meeting I was told about all the opportunity seeking resources I could utilize to hone in on my interest, and connect with alumni in the field. Despite being a little overwhelmed at first, I got myself organized; I did my research, and dove right in.

My search began on DukeConnect; I was able to speak with several alumni to get more information on a variety of career paths I was interested in pursuing. I also submitted applications to various internship programs passed along to me through that initial appointment. I utilized the drop-in advising services to perfect all my resumes and cover letters. Ultimately, I was accepted to the INROADS program, which strives to place underrepresented students in the business industry. I received my first internship through the INROADS process with a pharmaceutical lobbying group. Through the program I was able to receive business and industry training, and interned with the company for two summers thereafter. My internships played a very large role in determining my career interests, and ultimately supported my decision to attend law school. However, I would have never known about the experience if I hadn’t taken advantage of the all the opportunities the Career Center offers to students.

Often times, Duke can seem like a daunting a place and the internship/job search can be as well. The sheer number of opportunities can be overwhelming. But that shouldn’t be a reason to shy away. Instead, in order to take make the most of your four years here, and as I was told my first week here “It’s your job to take advantage of them!”

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Eat to Remember and Remember to Eat

The semester is rapidly coming to an end, and we all know what that means……. yup, time to study for finals. Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could offer you some secret eating tips to help boost your memory? Well we don’t have any magic formulas but we do have some good advice.

Think Healthy Fats

There is strong evidence that the same anti-inflammatory properties that help protect your heart can improve memory. These fats include fatty fish like salmon and tuna, nuts/seeds, avocado, olive oil and flax.

Where to find them on campus*:

·         Try the guacamole on your burrito bowl at Penn

·         Look for salmon and tuna or other fish on café menus  (Div café offers a salmon wrap, Café DeNovo offers a Tuna Nicoise salad, Penn serves salmon at dinner frequently, Perk has a salmon salad)

·         Add avocado or hummus to sandwiches and salads (ABP and other cafés)

·         Snack on nuts (available in the Lobby Shop, Quenchers and The East Campus Store), sprinkle sunflower seeds on your salad at salad bars

·         Pick up some individual containers of peanut butter and some fruit  for a healthy energizing snack

·         Try a grab and go hummus snack plate which is found at many cafés on campus

Devour Dark Fruits and Veggies

Fruits like blueberries, strawberries and dark green veggies like spinach, broccoli and collards are full of phytonutrients (dark greens include vitamin E and folate) with memory boosting properties.

Where to Find On Campus*:                            

·         Fruit cups are widely available at grab and go locations , also check out the fruit bar at Quenchers

·         Look for spinach and other dark greens at salad bars and as side dishes in many cafés

·         Add broccoli to your stir fry

Enjoy Whole Grain Goodness

Whole grains like oatmeal, quinoa, brown rice, etc. are an integral part of an anti-inflammatory diet like the Mediterranean diet. This type of diet plan promotes increased blood flow to the brain and has been linked to improved memory.

Where to Find on Campus*:

·         Look for whole grain salads at salad bars around campus

·         Many cafés have whole grain side dishes

·         Choose whole grain breads for sandwiches and create a satisfying breakfast with some oatmeal (Marketplace, Penn, Café Edens, Div  Café, ABP just to name a few)

 

Remember we don’t eat nutrients in isolation so for best results include these foods as part of a healthy eating pattern and remember to eat regularly throughout the day and stay hydrated.

Good luck and Happy Holiday eating.

*The cafes listed are only a sample of where you may find these foods on campus.  For a more thorough list refer to The Devil’s Advocate.

 

 

 

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