Have You Heard?

Department - Student Health

“Soy” What?

As a dietitian I am often asked questions about soy foods acting like estrogen in the body, are they safe? Do they contribute to causing breast cancer? I will admit over the years the information has been varied, but for the past several years researchers have found more and more information confirming that eating soy in moderation even as a breast cancer survivor is not a problem.

Since it is breast cancer awareness month I decided to do some additional research and explain for you in more detail.

First of all let’s think about where you might find soy in the diet, the following is a list of dietary sources:

·         edamame (raw soy beans),

·         soy milk, soy cheeses, soy yogurts

·         tofu (which is made from the bean curd)

·         tempeh (fermented soy)

·         miso (a Japanese flavoring made from fermented soybeans)

·         vegetarian foods like veggies burgers

The parts of the soy bean that are in question when it comes to breast cancer are the phytoestrogens (estrogen hormone-similar chemicals found in plants) known as isoflavones. There are two types of isoflavones in soy, genestein and daidzen. It is important to know that although these compounds can act like estrogen, they are only slightly as potent as the real stuff.

Large population studies of healthy women who reported details about their usual diet and were followed for many years, have shown no association between moderate soy intake and breast cancer rates.  Studies in Asian women have found a lower risk of breast cancer rates with higher soy consumption (4 or more servings per day), whereas studies in the U.S. have not found any association between how much soy a woman consumes and her risk of breast cancer.   Other things to consider are lifelong dietary and lifestyle patterns not noted in these studies.

What about soy intake for breast cancer surviviors? There are studies that show that small amounts of soy are safe and may be protective for surviors. However the best advice is to discuss the pros and cons with your health care provider until more conslusive data is available.

When it comes to taking supplements research is finding mixed results, basically the jury is out and the recommendation is to “avoid concentrated sources of soy such as soy-containing pills or powders, or supplements containing high amounts of isoflavones.” (American Cancer Society).

When making the decision to consume soy or not, remember that tofu and other soy foods have considerable health benefits and are linked to lower rates of heart disease. Because they are excellent sources of protein, soy foods may replace other less healthy foods in the diet and therefore help lower cholesterol. Also soy is an excellent good quality protein alternative for those who follow a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Bottom line: avoid pill and powdered soy supplements and enjoy soy foods in moderation.

Resources:

The American Institute of Cancer Research (www.aicr.org) and The American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org)

 

 

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Student Health Closed Saturday 10/11

The Student Health Center will be closed on Saturday, 10/11, for Fall Break. We will re-open with normal operating hours on Monday, October 13th, at 8:30am.

For after hours health care options, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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More carbs! Less carbs! No carbs! More protein! Less protein! No protein?

Swimming in a sea of conflicting nutrition advice? Have no fear! “The Big Three” are here!

“The Big Three” tutorials are streamlined guides to understanding carbs, proteins, and fats. Complete with colorful pictures (featuring some of your fellow Dukies!) and “take-home messages,” these user-friendly tutorials offer the basics on the 3 essential macronutrients - what they are, where to find them, why they’re important, and how much our bodies need to succeed!

“The Big Three” tutorials will hopefully serve as a springboard for more extensive discussion in the “Nutrition in a Nutshell” series, coming soon!

Hungry for more??

Follow Duke Student Health Nutrition Services on  Facebook and Twitter for nifty tips, nutrition myth-busters, and news on awesome foodie events (like “Meatless Monday” specials at Penn and Marketplace for Vegetarian Awareness Month). 

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Tis the Season…For Coughs and Colds

With temperatures dropping and students hunkered down together in classrooms, libraries and dorm rooms, the germs are starting to fly around campus.  Not surprisingly, there is an uptick in students looking for help from the Student Health Center, and demand for appointments is high.

While most of what they're seeing at Student Health are common cold symptoms, there are some things to watch out for.

Read more.

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The ‘Surgeon General’ for Duke Students

Dr. John Vaughn, Blue Devil of the Week

An interesting day at work for me: All the various medical departments have grand rounds at which they invite someone to come speak on a topic. The Pediatrics department invited me to come do a grand rounds presentation on college health. I think that was a memorable moment for me because it let me present my vision of how higher education and medicine can work together to make innovative changes in how health care is delivered.  One of the reasons I came to Duke is that student health is considered an active participant in the medical community as well as the university community. The positive reception I received at those grand rounds confirmed that I came to the right place.

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Service Information for Alexander Rickabaugh and Kaila Brown

Student Affairs will be arranging transportation to the funeral and memorial services of Alexander Rickabaugh. We hope to accommodate all students who would like to attend these services via chartered bus.  In order to meet transportation demands please complete the following questions to reserve a spot:
https://duke.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_dhBDLU8uCZJY9KJ

We are working out options for food on the bus for the way out and back, but if you have specific dietary needs, please bring food with you.

Services will be held Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Details below.

Friday, September 26th:
The funeral service will be held at Centenary United Methodist Church in Winston-Salem (646 W. 5th St., Winston-Salem, NC 27101). The family will receive friends following the service.

The schedule will be as follows:

  • Bus staged at 4:00pm
  • Bus departure time from the West Campus Bus Stop at 4:45pm
  • Funeral at Centenary United Methodist Church in Winston-Salem at 7:00pm
  • Bus leaves from Winston-Salem at approximately 9:00pm
  • Bus returns after the funeral to the West Campus Bus Stop at approximately 10:30pm

Saturday, September 27th:
Memorial program at Forsyth Country Day School in Lewisville, NC
If you would like to attend this memorial program please note the following. Bus transportation will be provided for students interested in attending, leaving from the West Campus Bus Stop at 8:00am.

The schedule will be as follows:

  • Bus staged at 7:30am
  • Bus leaves at 8:00am
  • Memorial Service at Forsyth Country Day (5501 Shallowford Rd., Lewisville, NC 27023) 10:00am
  • Bus leaves from Forsyth Country Day at 11:30am
  • Bus arrives back on West Campus at approximately 1:30pm

Sunday, September 28:
Additionally, On Sunday morning at the start of the 11am worship service in Duke Chapel there will be a silent procession of roses for Alex and Kaila. This is a way of remembering them, honoring their lives and providing a space for community grief in the midst of Duke’s weekly Chapel service.

We have not yet heard anything more about memorial plans for Kaila Brown. I'll be sure to let you know if we do.

We will continue to do all we can to offer support and comfort to all. I urge each of you to take advantage of all opportunities for care should you or anyone you know be in distress. All students can contact Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at 919-660-1000 and in an emergency, please call Duke Police at 919-684-2444 or by dialing 911.

You can also contact DukeReach (http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/dukereach1) at 919-681-2455 or at dukereach@duke.edu.

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Artificial Sweeteners: Generally Regarded as Safe?

In the past we discussed options for sugar substitutes, such as honey, agave nectar, and brown rice syrup - all tasty options to sweeten your food or beverage, but that do come with a caloric punch. This week, we’ll dedicate our post to the sweeteners that are calorie-free, yet a bit controversial – artificial sweeteners. Think of those colored packets on your restaurant table, diet cola, sugar-free gum and candy, and sugar-free yogurt or ice cream to name a few – artificially sweetened substances are all around. But what are they? These synthetic sugar substitutes are sometimes derived from natural substances, such as herbs or even table sugar.  These sweeteners are many times sweeter than regular sugar and are sometimes called “intense sweeteners.”

Possible health benefits?  On one hand, artificial sweeteners don’t contain any calories, so you may think of them as a way to lower your calorie intake. However, research indicates this may not be the case, and it’s been suggested that consuming these artificial sweeteners may be associated with no change in weight or in some, an increase in weight.  On the other hand, artificial sweeteners don't contribute to tooth decay like sugar can.

Possible health risks? Benefits aside, you might be wondering if there are any downfalls to these chemicals and for good reason - these sweeteners have been the target of scrutiny for many years.  The most recent study that has been in the news shows that these sweeteners have an impact on our gut microbiota and may raise our blood glucose, which is linked with diabetes and weight gain.

Studies that date back to the 1970’s had linked some of these sweeteners, such as saccharin (Sweet’N Low, one you might not see as much of any more—the pink packet), to bladder cancer but we now know that’s not the case.  However, this doesn’t rule out the possibility of side-effects such as dizziness and headaches from modest amounts. If you experience these side effects, it’s probably best to limit or avoid these sweeteners.

Here is some more information the National Cancer Institute: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/artificial-sweeteners

Who’s regulating?  For the most part, we do have a governmental agency with our health in their best interest. Artificial sweeteners are regulated by the FDA as “food additives.” Before they are approved to be sold, they are thoroughly reviewed and determined safe by FDA. When these additives are approved, they are declared “generally recognized as safe" (GRAS).

Artificial sweeteners currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are:

·         Acesulfame potassium (Sunett, Sweet One)

·         Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet)

·         Neotame

·         Saccharin (SugarTwin, Sweet'N Low)

·         Sucralose (Splenda)

Bottom-line: if you do opt for non-nutritive/artificial sweeteners, they are, like most things, best enjoyed in moderation. Overconsumption can lead to symptoms as undesirable as gas, bloating, dizziness, and headaches.

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Take Your Nutrition News with a Grain of Salt

In the past few days, news of a recent study praising the health benefits of a low-carb diet has spread like wildfire through headlines and across the Internet.  Good Morning America featured a segment entitled, “Low-Carb May Trump Low-Fat in Diet Wars” and urged listeners to “back away from the bagel” if they were watching their figures.  TIME magazine exclaimed, “If you’re trying to lose weight, fat might be your friend” and was joined in the lipid lauding frenzy by National Public Radio whose online article leads with “Turns out, eating foods with fat…doesn’t make us fat.”  The New York Times, where I and many other students I know turn for breaking news, issued “A Call for a Low-Carb Diet” and it quickly became the most emailed story on the day of its publication.  But before we as readers get too caught up by these attention-grabbing statements, it’s important to investigate what’s really lying beneath the headlines. 

 

To start, I’ll summarize my take-aways after reading the New York Times article on this breaking nutrition news.  The article presented the findings of a study published in the September 2014 volume of the Annals of Internal Medicine and funded by the National Institutes of Health – already, this is sounding highly credible with such big names on board.  The study looked at a “racially diverse group of 150 men and women” (yay for generalizability!) who were split into two groups that each received different dietary guidelines.  The low-fat group was instructed to limit their total fat intake to less than 30% of their daily calories as recommended by the federal government guidelines – seems reasonable.  The low-carb/high-fat group upped their fat intake to more than 40% of their daily calories and were told to eat mostly foods like fish, olive oil, nuts, cheese, and red meat.  Both were encouraged to eat veggies and neither group had to watch their calories nor change levels of physical activity.  At the end of a year, the low-carb group lost an average of eight pounds more than the low-fat group, had greater reductions in body fat and greater increases in lean muscle mass, and significantly lowered their heart attack risk.  Seems simple, sign me up!  I can lose weight, build muscle, and have a healthy heart just by eating my eggs and bacon, no exercise or calorie counting required. 

 

Now before you order up that next cheeseburger without its bun, it’s important to step back from the media and critically assess what the research is really telling us.  David L. Katz, a doctor and director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center, published an insightful response article to the low-carb craze headlines, bringing to light some crucial caveats of the study that nearly all news articles are glossing over.  First, not all fats or carbohydrates are created equal so it’s inaccurate and counterproductive to talk about diets in such umbrella terms like low-fat or low-carb.  Secondly, it needs to be known that all study participants had BMIs categorizing them as obese, making the results not nearly as generalizable as they have been portrayed.  Lastly, the true diet conditions for the low-carb and low-fat groups in the study have been very poorly communicated to the public.  Comparing the diet guidelines given in the study with the participants’ pre-study diets reveals that the low-fat group only reduced fat intake by 5%, while the low-carb group reduced carbohydrate intake by nearly 75%.  In light of this evidence, it makes sense that the much more restrictive diet would result in greater weight loss. 

 

To conclude, Katz leads us away from the trendy diet fads and recommends eating whole foods in sensible quantities.  He also recommends that we approach health headlines with a more careful eye to see past the sensationalism that can make a good story, but not the best lifestyle advice.  It’s important to be aware that not all of the facts surrounding a research study’s methods and findings make their way into the media’s presentations.  But, that doesn’t mean that we need to write off all health and wellness news as nonsense – if a headline does make your head turn, dig a little deeper, seek out more details from primary sources, and look at what other experts and critical voices in the field have to say.  With a little extra effort, you’ll find the news that’s really worth your attention.      

 

Note of Interest: A few days after this initial media firestorm, the New York Times re-published the article with a new headline, “A Call for a Low-Carb Diet that Embraces Fat.”   

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Student Health Closed on 9/1

The Student Health Center will be closed on Monday, 9/1, in observance of the Labor Day holiday.

We will re-open with normal operating hours on Tuesday, 9/2, at 8:30am.

For after-hours care and nurse advice, please call 919-681-9355.

 
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How to Eat Like a Healthy Devil

Welcome to Duke!

Whether you are a first year student away from home for the first time, or returning as an upperclassman and ready to explore your dining options on West, you might want some tips about how to eat well on campus. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Think of healthy eating as having three components, timing, balance and mindfulness.

1.       Timing. Remember to eat regularly throughout the day; you can’t expect to get through your busy days if you don’t have energy (and food is energy!). A common mistake many students make is skipping meals or going too many hours without eating. If you have the First Year Board plan don’t forget to eat a small meal or snack to keep you going between meals.  

If you are too hungry and faced with an “all you care to eat” meal option at dinner, you are likely to overeat. You might think you are getting your money’s worth, but your body will pay the price.

 

Think you are too busy to stop and eat? There are many options for grab and go meals and snacks on West campus or Trinity Café on East.

If you have time for a sit down meal midday that’s even better.  Check out your options here.

 

2.       Balance. Make sure to include some lean protein, veggies and/or fruit and whole grains at most meals. Balancing Your Plate will keep you on the right track to healthy eating, sustained energy and weight management.

 

3.       Mindfulness. Above all remember to eat when you are hungry and stop when you are comfortably full. Eating too little or too much will keep you thinking about food instead of focused on all the other things you want to do at Duke.

Eat what you like, get enough of it and get on with your day!

 

Have a great year!

 

Additional Resources:

Healthy Eating at Duke- it’s “Devilishly” Easy

Smart Snacking

Duke Student Health Nutrition

For more information on eating well at Duke meet with a Student Health Nutritionist

919-681-9355

 

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How to Not be a Stress Zombie

Stress Zombies—we’ve all seen them. They can be easily recognized by the bags under their eyes and their beaten coffee cups. They shuffle across campus with a dazed look in their eyes, thinking about the endless list of tasks that they must complete. The mountains of books and articles surrounding a stress zombie can make it difficult to see one in its natural habitat. The most commonly seen stress zombies are usually spotted coming out of Perkins holding a warm, just-completed paper. Almost every Duke student can attest to having been a stress zombie at some point in his or her academic career. Here are some ways that you can avoid being a stress zombie:

1. Get some sleep. I know that sleep sounds like a four letter word when the assignments are piling up and you don’t how you’re ever going to pass Orgo, but I promise that you’re going to be more productive after some rest than you are when you are falling asleep on your keyboard.
http://cdn.thatssotrue.com/2012/3/10/thatssotrue_4250_1331407757.gif

2. Schedule your study time. List your assignments in order of importance, length, and due date. Prioritize which assignments you should do first and which ones are going to require the most time. This should keep you from being up all night before a paper is due.
http://imgur.com/wZgxVGY

3. Make time for friends. If you’re going for days without talking to your friends and only doing work, you’re going to get stressed. You need your support system to keep you on track.
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4. Find your stress relief method. Everyone has something that helps to relieve stress. It could be the gym, a walk, listening to your favorite song, playing a game, or anything else. Make time to do whatever it is that helps you to unwind.
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True Blue Academics

In my opinion, one of the more difficult aspects of the transition to college has to do with academics.  Being one of the top universities in the country, Duke’s courses are likely more difficult and demanding than what you experienced in high school.

By no means am I saying that classes at Duke are impossible to do well in, but there are simple steps you can take to avoid feeling overwhelmed by the papers, midterms, quizzes, and textbook readings Duke will throw at you. 

Time management is the key term here.  In college your focus may be drawn to countless different things: friends, sports, boyfriends/girlfriends, clubs, video games, Netflix, but it is important to keep in mind that you are here to learn.  Those things are all great, but schoolwork should be your primary objective; you will have to learn to balance fun with work and responsibility.

However, if you do find yourself struggling with a certain class, you may be able to get a student tutor through the university free of charge.  At the Academic Resource Center (ARC) located behind the marketplace on East Campus, students can apply for one tutor per semester.  Last semester, I got a tutor for my multivariable calculus class, and it definitely me helped a lot.  Unfortunately, there are not tutors available for every class taught at Duke, but the peer tutors at the ARC do cover most of the large lecture classes such as chemistry, econ, and physics.  For a full list, check out their website http://duke.edu/arc/peer_tutoring/index.php. 

Another great resource to consult about classes at Duke is the upperclassmen.  Don’t be hesitant to ask your older friends for advice on which classes to take, or even for help in a subject they are majoring in.  We love to help you guys out in whatever ways we can!

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Finding your place

It is up to you to define your college experience. Do not depend on anyone else to do that for you. Whether you chose to become a part of Greek life, SLGs, or staying independent, that is strictly your decision.

Freshman year was definitely an interesting time when it came to making friends.  I remember making so many new friends during O-Week and then suddenly seeing them disappear as time went on. This sort of thing happens throughout the year. You see your circle of friends constantly growing and shrinking. Come spring semester, a lot of your friends will be rushing fraternities, sororities, and SLGs- you may find yourself rushing too.

I ended up rushing a SLG my freshmen year and I do not regret it. I found the environment of a SLG more fitting for me than that of a fraternity.  Everyone I met during the process was welcoming and enthusiastic to meet me. I do not regret my decision of joining the Round Table community. I made so many great memories and built strong relationships. I have found my family at Duke.

I believe that my experience with finding my place at Duke was due to the fact that I was not pressured to join a specific group or organization. Everything that I did was done at my own will. I tested the waters with several things: DSG, Crew, and other clubs. Freshman year is definitely the best to time explore your options because all of your peers are also scrambling around trying to find their niche. It gets a little more difficult as the years go by as people already have established themselves in a particular group, but it is not impossible to do.

If you are willing to put in the effort, then you will get a great college experience in return. Do not sweat the small stuff. Just be yourself and have fun.

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Student Health Closed until 11 AM

The Student Health Center will be closed until 11 am today, Wednesday, 8/13. For nurse advice or healthcare options, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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Student Health Closed 8/4 AM

The Student Health Center will be closed on Monday, 8/4, until 1:30pm.

For nurse advice or healthcare options, please call us at 919-681-9355.

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Ridiculously Sweet

What's up, everyone.  I'm Steve Mazzari out of Montclair, New Jersey, and I'm heading into my sophomore year here at this ridiculously sweet place called Duke University.  Before I talk about more Duke stuff, I guess I should share a few things about my background. I've lived in Montclair my whole life and spent ten years (pre-K through 8th) at the ultra tiny elementary school Lacordaire Academy where my mom taught and is now principal.  Despite being a Jersey suburbs dude through and through, I actually went to a Catholic high school named Regis in Manhattan where I ran track and cross-country. Now I'm here in the Pratt school studying Electrical and Computer Engineering.  That's basically my whole life in, like, six sentences.

Enough about my uneventful existence, I wanna talk about you. You guys have to be pretty freaking nervous right now.  Honestly, I'd be worried about your state of being if you weren't.  When I was in your spot, I wasn't worried about leaving home or even living on my own, although that stuff is pretty scary.  It's that horrible feeling of, "Will I be happy here?  Will these people like me?  Will I like these people?  Can I do well in school and still enjoy my hobbies and have a social life?" which all kind of culminate in the "Did I make the right choice?"  All legitimate questions for sure, but let me ease some of your worry.  Duke is easily diverse enough to let you meet literally any group of people (and I don't mean ethnicity or nationality) and more than exciting enough to provide you with the exact opportunity you want, even if you don't know what you want yet.  I know these are pretty huge claims here.  I also know other colleges say the same thing, and honestly, a lot of them are right too.  That said, I can stand by Duke and my comments when I say this is truly a special place where, if you put in the effort, you will find your place and love every minute of it (like me).

Now onto O-week.  Since it was only about 11 months ago, I remember my first days as a freshman very well.  It was hot and humid and I sweat nearly the whole week but it's a crazy fun time.  You basically get a list of about a hundred things to do and you try to go to as many as you can while meeting as many people as one possibly can.  I know this is really daunting since you all just formed your friends for life in high school. And, gosh dangit, why do I have to talk to complete strangers now?  I should just sit in my room and watch Netflix for 6,700 hours and close out the year bla bla bla, but WAIT.  I need you to trust me one more time when I say it's all good because everyone is in the same boat. Everyone wants to make friends too, so the process is smoother and quicker.

As for True Blue, this is one of the main events during orientation week that will really help give you an idea about college life and ease you into the year.  It's pretty funny and a little weird too, so I won't give too much of it away, but you got to see it my future homies.  I can't wait to be friends with all you peeps, and welcome to Duke!!!

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A Whole New World

First of all, I would like to say congrats to the class of 2018 for choosing to come to Duke!  Soon you will realize that it was the best decision you have made in your entire life; personally, I could not be happier here.

My name is Justin Johnson, and I am a rising sophomore from Winston-Salem, North Carolina, home of the Krispy Kreme doughnut and Chris Paul.  I’m an alumnus of the esteemed Wilson Dorm, majoring in Economics and pursuing the Markets and Management certificate too.  Outside of the classroom, I’m on the club running team https://www.facebook.com/dukeclubrunning?ref=br_tf  and am a member of an IFC fraternity.  I graduated from a large high school where I ran Cross-Country and am proud to say that I have completed both a marathon and a half-Ironman triathlon.  So message me if you like to run, or if you don’t like to run but just want to talk.

I may have only attended school at Duke for one year thus far, but my fascination with this place goes way back to when I was just a little kid sitting in front of the TV, watching Duke dominate on the hardwood.  I grew up a Duke fan and was ecstatic to learn that I would be able to live out my dream as a student in the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences.  However, even though I knew Duke was the place for me, I would be lying if I said I was not a little nervous as August crept closer and closer.  I had never been to summer camp before, or even away from my family for more than a few weeks at a time, and wondered how I would adjust to living on my own in an unfamiliar town.  I wondered if I would feel overwhelmed with new classes, new people, new expectations, but I soon realized that it was all going to be alright.  If there were one piece of advice I could give you, it would be to relax.  The transition to college is similar to a roller-coaster ride, scary when you’re waiting in line but incredible once you’re strapped in. 

When you arrive at Duke a whole new world will open up to you.  That’s where True Blue comes in.  True Blue is a program sponsored by the Wellness Center designed to educate incoming students on all aspects of wellness at Duke.  We aren’t going to tell you not to drink or go to Shooters, but we will try our best to provide you the tools you need to make healthy decisions, anywhere from the Marketplace to an off-campus party.  I can’t wait to meet you all in a few weeks, but until then enjoy your summer.

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The Help

Most people do not like talking about their problems, whether they are academic, financial or emotional – especially at a place like Duke. The stigma attached to mental health issues do not mix well with the Duke community. Things become a lot more daunting when there are unrelenting expectations to be the perfect student with an immaculate academic record; this quickly tears away at one’s self-esteem and life.

When I first arrived on campus, two years ago, I was ambitious and ready to tackle whatever was thrown at me. However, following my first semester, I realized that things were not fine. I used to conquer school, but now it was conquering me. I had no one to talk to about what was going on inside my head. I thought, ‘people have their own issues to deal with’. I did not want to be a burden. Speaking about how poorly I was doing in my classes would be humiliating. In addition, being 3,000 miles away from my home did not help my situation.

No one ever thinks that they will suffer from depression until it actually happens. Before leaving for college, I always thought that I was healthy and happy with my life. I never thought that my life would spiral out of control. I isolated myself from everyone because I did not want to be perceived as crazy. I found myself unable to escape the clutches of my bed. If it was not for a close friend of mine recommending CAPS (Counseling and Psychological Services) to me, I am sure that I probably would have been kicked out of school.

CAPS is a beautiful thing- it really is. Before ever walking in to my first appointment, I thought that I was going to be bombarded with questions by a psychologist that thought I was crazy. That was not the case. I was asked to talk about everything that was bothering me: school, family, money, etc. I was given the opportunity to vent to someone who I knew would not judge me - they just listened and gave advice. As I continued to visit regularly, I began to feel a huge weight lift off my shoulders. I was able to breathe throughout the day with ease. Most importantly, I started to do well in school again.

If I could offer any advice to an incoming student, it would be to make an appointment at CAPS if they are ever going through some tough times. I know that the easiest thing to do is to bottle up your emotions, but that will only make things worse. Remember to always take care of yourself first.

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Giving to Gain

Hello Class of 2018! My name is Gabrielle Sawyer and I am a rising junior studying Public Policy and Markets and Management. I have just returned home to Washington, D.C. after spending a very eventful semester in SoCal with Duke in Los Angeles. In addition to taking courses with USC and Duke professors, I interned at Overbrook Entertainment on the Sony Pictures Studio lot. The decision to trade in Durham for Hollywood was an uncanny one given my calculated nature. Before leaving, I was a straight-laced pre-med student wary of exploring my lingering interests for film and media. Given the traditional nature of Duke, I never thought it possible to make a living in the entertainment industry. My perspective began to change as I connected with Duke alumni that work as successful producers, agents, and journalists. 

Giving up pre-med has been one of the most uncomfortable and stressful decisions I have made so far at Duke. Giving up the security of a stable career track has really pushed the boundaries of myself and of my family. I sometimes worry that by not becoming a doctor, I am throwing away this extraordinary opportunity to study at such a prestigious university.

Finding that spark and that passion may not come as easy for some. I am evidence of this. It is okay to be fearful of the future. Just don’t let that fear keep you from building a life full of vigor and energy.  The worst possible thing you can do during your four years at Duke is to choose a career path that does not make you happy nor challenges your abilities as an intelligent and creative human being.
This is YOUR time. Live these four years up AND make wise decisions. Have fun!

On that note, I can’t wait to meet you all! Enjoy the rest of your summer.

-Gabby

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True Blue Gloria Adedoyin

Hey folks! I'm Gloria Adedoyin. I am from Greensboro, North Carolina, and I have one older sister who graduated from Carolina. I'm a Biology/History double major with dreams of becoming a pharmacist when I graduate. I really love history especially American and pre-modern Russian history so if you are interested in that kind of thing come talk to me! I played lacrosse in high school and still love to play. I'm director of programming for DukeAfrica so stick with me, and I'll show you some really cool events we have planned related to the Continent. I am also a member of Brownstone Selective Living Group.

My experience at Duke has been incredible so far. I've had the opportunity to study abroad for two summers in both Germany & Australia, respectively. Travel is another one of my biggest interests; being able to visit new places and get credit at the same time was great. When you visit different countries or even interact with different kinds of people you find that the things that seem to be large differences between you are really only subtle nuances. It's really enlightening to find that we are all a lot more connected than we might first anticipate. ALSO, If you happen to travel to Berlin, Germany I highly recommend you visit Mustafa's for the best döner you've ever had.
 
Fun Fact: Until I received my acceptance, I was a total UNC fan. Please forgive me for my long-term lapse in judgement. I was corrupted by my sister. However, after visiting Duke on Blue Devil Days and discovering the magic that is the Gothic Wonderland, I soon realized how wrong I'd been. Aside from how pretty the campus is, East Campus and Duke's position as a leading institution of biological research were two other, major factors contributing to my decision to come here.

I remember watching True Blue as a freshman and being somewhat skeptical about the performance. I've seen enough adults attempting to convey serious messages to teenagers in "cool" "hip" or "relevant" ways only for it to come off corny and silly rather than informational. True Blue surprised me though. Students were delivering the message. Students were leading the discussions. Students that had personally (or through friends) experienced first-hand the things they were talking about and talking about them in a fun, casual way. That resonated with me a lot more deeply than some of the other information about college I'd received. And, for once I could ask questions about things I was too embarrassed or too nervous to ask. For me, True Blue delivered the most relevant advice and information because it came straight from students like me and you. I joined the True Blue cast so I could actively help in shaping that message. True Blue is there to provide you with information to make informed, decisions.

Long story short: True Blue exists to help you have the most kickass freshman (and future!) experience at Duke in the safest, healthiest way possible.

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