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University Center Activities & Events

University Center Activities & Events

Leadership Learning from a Canine

When asked to submit reflections on leadership, I immediately desired to have the reflection correlate with the topical focus of ethos and leadership. That after all is what I would spend time and energy speaking on at Framework Friday (April 11th 3pm UCAE…shameless plug).  However, I was reflecting upon the idea while walking Diamond, our family dog.  Our life at home revolves around her anyway, so it was not surprising that she became my immediate focus regarding leadership.  Here’s what she taught me…

In the evening when I arrive home from work and put my purse and laptop bag down, I open one of our kitchen drawers. Immediately when Diamond hears that sound, she excitedly runs downstairs. In leadership, we must answer the call to lead! Perhaps there is an issue that is buzzing in the ethos, and it requires attention.  Or perhaps, there is an issue that is so challenging, that people feel powerless or silenced to address.  Whichever the case, leaders should be curious enough to see a need and begin, with excitement to maneuver with readiness.

After I secure Diamond’s leash out of the drawer and attach it to her collar, she runs to the door, jumping high and wagging her tail to go outside and begin her walk.  As leaders, we must be enthusiastic about our journey.  When Diamond goes outside, she surveys our front yard, and looks in both directions of our street.  She notices everything before leaving our area.  Leaders must be acutely aware of their immediate resources.  Even though Diamond repeats this behavior daily, and is so keenly connected to her foundation, she never fails to notice any changes that may have emerged since her last outing.  As leaders, we cannot become so entrenched that we fail to look for newness in those who have elected to support us in our leadership.  We must take time to survey our landscape and appreciate the gifts of those around us before we elect to start on our destined path.

Once Diamond has completed her inventory, she sets out on her walk.  She typically walks ahead of me, but she is constantly stopping and looking back to see if I’m following.  Dr. Johnetta B. Cole once said, “If you are a leader, and no one is following you, you are just taking a long walk.”  As leaders, we must ensure that we have enlisted support and that what we are leading actually matters.  Of course, there are times when one must stand alone, but those are fewer and more far apart.  On the average, what you elect to provide leadership for should emerge from a space that others share a similar passion and are placing trust and faith in you to stay the course.

Even though we typically walk the same path, day after day, Diamond never ceases to loose focus of the end point (which happens to be our mailbox).  She is determined to get there, despite the wind, rain and as we experienced this season, the snow and ice.  The ethos around us may change regularly, as well as people’s opinions, but when we are focused with our predetermined end goal, the elements won’t matter.  We are instead as leaders, committed to the greater goal.

As we return home, Diamond always stops and speaks to someone along the way.  As leaders, we must never forget to take time along the journey for interacting with others.  We don’t have all the answers.  Sometimes a brief exchange may provide just what we need to support our work.  These brief moments may awaken the desire to lead in another.  Small beginnings are critical!

When we reach home, Diamond looks for water and finds a place to rest.  Restoration and self-care is critically important and essential as leaders.  Without it, we will not be well for self, those we are leading or for the work we’re expected to do.

As leaders, we must allow ourselves to be vulnerable enough to learn and to grow.  Only then will we create a path for success and sustainability.  As much as I believe I know about leadership, I’m still learning more everyday.  Yes, in fact you can teach an old dog new tricks!

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Announcement of Nominees

Congratulations to the following students, organizations, faculty and staff, who have been nominated to receive Duke University’s most prestigious campus-wide honors for leadership and service. Awards will be presented at the Duke University Student Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony on April 21, 2014.

Betsy Alden Outstanding Service-Learning Award

Nicole Daniels
Nicholas Grace
Leah Mische
Noha Sherif
Jacob Tobia
Katharine Waldman

Baldwin Scholars Unsung Heroine Award

Caroline Kiritsy
Alexandria Lattimore
Karmyn McKnight
Hanna Metaferia

Faculty and Staff Student Interaction Award

Janie Long

Lars Lyon Volunteer Service Award

Emily Harris

Leading at Duke Leadership and Service Awards

First-Year Student
Ileana Astorga
Bryce McAteer

Sophomore Student
Daniel Kort
Isabella Kwai
Pranava Raparla
Jay Sullivan
Emma Zhao

Junior Student
Elisa Berson
Mariel Charles
Emily Feng
Elena Lagon
Joyce Lau
Jen Lunde
Viju Mathew
Janvi Shah
Aarti Thakkar

Outstanding New Student Organization
Duke Athlete Ally
Community Empowerment Fund (CEF)

Outstanding Established Student Organization
Mi Gente
Senior Class Council
Know Your Status
Duke Marketing Club
GlobeMed at Duke University
 

Julie Anne Levey Memorial Leadership Award

Hala Daou
Rinzin Dorjee
Steve Soto
Gary Yeh

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award 

Ryan Bartholomew
Hannah Ward
Edwin “Will” Woodhouse, III

Class of 2017 Awards
Carlton Adams
Elena Baldwin
Anna Bensley
Amina Bility
Tina Chen
Phoebe Donovan
Rinzin Dorjee
James Ferencsik
Lauren Hagedorn
Ben Hoover
Will Floyd-Jones
Raina Kishan
Leo Lou
Aishu Nag
Beatrice Pepera
Basil Seif
Lauren Shum

William J. Griffith University Service Award

Outstanding Contributions to the Duke Community
Lindsay Barnes
Li Chen
Robert Collopy
Danping (Donna) Dana (Sun)
Leilani Doktor
Valentine Esposito
Denzell Faison
Kristina Hallam
Andrew Hanna
Nikki Jenkins
Joyce Lau
Grady Lenkin
Derek Lindsay
Melina Lopez
Danny Nolan
Parker Poliakoff
Lillie Reed
Kyra Socolf
Nandini Srinivasan
Lynn Vandendriessche
Guang Yang

Outstanding Contributions to the Durham and Local Community
Grace Benson
Steven Blasner
Andrew Hanna
Eneka Lamb
Shane Stone
Emma Wilson

Outstanding Contributions to the Global Community
Joy Liu
Leah Mische
Craig Moxley
Jacob Tobia
Jessye Waxman

Student Affairs Distinguished Leadership and Service Award

Building Alliances through Collective Engagement
Kelly Bies
Steven Blaser
Andrew Hanna
Katie Howard
Anastasia Karklina
Anays Murillo
James Paul Senter
Remi Sun

Commitment to Diversity
Jacob Tobia
Rachel White

Demonstration of Integrity
Athidi Guthikonda
Andrew Rotolo

Expanding the Boundaries of Learning
Vishnu Kadiyala
Leah Mische
Nandini Srinivasan

Respect for Community
Andrew Hanna
Adriana Guzman Holst
Anays Murillo
Adam Rodriguez
Megan Stanford
Kristen Westfall

For more details, visit https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/ucae/leadership/leadership-service-awards

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Leadership Through Service (Leadership Lunch)

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On Location: Peru #DukeASB14

Hola Duke! We're reporting live from Peru with 12 amazing Duke students and two awesome advisors. We're squeezing a lot of experiences and adventure into a short amount of time and wanted to take a quick second to give a live update while we're here in action. Stay tuned for a full recap, but if you just can't wait until we get back home here are a few quotes from the ASB participants to digest as an appetizer.

"I do a lot of volunteering with the elderly at back home at Duke and I've really appreciated seeing the similarities and differences in volunteering with these two similar communities in different environments" - Trish Ike '15.

Returning to Peru for her second ASB, this time as site co-leader, Lindsey Olivere '15 said: "This time around I'm enjoying seeing everything in Peru as much as I'm enjoying seeing everyone else take part in this adventure".

"The people of Villa El Salvador are full of hope. They've come a long way and no matter the conditions they believe things will get better. Witnessing the leaders and people of this community has filled me with respect" - James Tian '15.

"It warms my heart to know that I've made a positive impact on the students of INABIF elementary school and hopefully I'll make a lasting impression" Brandon Watkins '14.

"Being immersed in a different culture has shown me the many differences and similarities between people but the individual interactions with the children of INABIF gives me hope that they will be able to dream big and reach new heights" Ritika Patil '16.

"I will forever be changed by the smiles and the laughter of the kids at my school. They were very welcoming and allowed me to enter their hearts and minds and I will be forever grateful" Marcus Benning '14.

We will have more ro talk about and share when we return. It's been an amazing week so far and we can't wait to share it with you.

-ASB Peru 

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Leadership Through Service

In this short life
That only lasts an hour
How much, how little
Is within our power.
             --Emily Dickinson

We often associate leadership with power, but there is also a notion of Servant-Leadership, in which one’s power is exercised in service, or acting for the common good.  Duke’s mission of “knowledge in the service of society” reflects this idea, and many of our programs and activities provide opportunities for students to “serve”—whether on campus, in the Durham community, or in the larger world.  Life, Short, Much, Little—every day we might ask, “How do I make today matter in the midst of all the things I have to do?”

Leadership through service is a deliberate way to cultivate many of the values students claim to want to develop in their goals for “improving the world,” “making a difference,” “becoming a good person,” “being a change agent,” or “following my passion!” Acts of service (or a serving orientation to life) take you outside yourself and your own little sphere to new communities and people who can teach you much about yourself, as well as about life as you do not know it.  And it IS “within our power” (i.e. LEADING your own life!) to find or create opportunities for this daily.

Service-Learning employs a reflection practice which helps us discover what matters, and what is within our power, as we describe, examine, and articulate our experiences.  Each of these steps can apply to any life experience, and I urge you to consider them in the context of your own efforts to “lead from within.”

Step One:   Describe.  Ask yourself, “What am I doing?”  (An internet guru recently said on NPR, “Attention is now the scarcest resource of all.”  So be intentional about objectively noticing what is going on in any particular moment (this is also called Mindfulness), and what details are significant—in your behaviors, attitudes,  the people you are with, the setting, how you are feeling. (This will, of course, require that you set aside your earphones and turn off your cell phone so that you can focus on the specifics!)  “I am sitting on the bus next to someone I don’t know and I am eager to get this next class over with so I can go to the gym.”  Or “I am tutoring a third-grader who can hardly speak English and I feel inadequate to help her learn to read.”

Step Two:  Examine. Ask yourself, “What could I be doing differently—or better?  How can I enlarge my world to embrace more of this moment/opportunity/challenge?  Why am I feeling uncomfortable
/happy/relieved/eager—or nothing?”  As you focus on this step, be aware of the responses that emerge—“I could start a conversation with a stranger.”  “I want to take a walk in the gardens.”  “I could make some picture flash cards for the child I am tutoring.”  I am resisting identifying my feelings because that might interfere with what I need to be doing.”  “I’d like to write a note to a former teacher.”  “I want to know more about the Durham public schools.”

Step Three.  Articulate. Ask yourself, “What have I learned from this experience—about myself, about other people, about the way the world works, about the way this school/organization behaves?”  Then, “How can I apply any new insights and understandings to other experiences and moments?” What can I change—in myself, my environment, my relationships—that enable me to exercise what is “in our power”-- and to “make a difference”?

The poets always say it best: 

Pay attention.
Be amazed.
Tell about it.
      --Mary Oliver

The DEAL model for Critical Reflection was developed by Dr. Patti Clayton and others, and can be explored more fully at http://www.ncsu.edu/cece/resources/deal_model.php.

Leader in Residence lunch and discussion with Dr. Betsy Alden
Noon - 1 pm
March 21st
005A Bryan Center

Audience: 

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Leadership Through Service

In this short life
That only lasts an hour
How much, how little
Is within our power.
             --Emily Dickinson

We often associate leadership with power, but there is also a notion of Servant-Leadership, in which one’s power is exercised in service, or acting for the common good.  Duke’s mission of “knowledge in the service of society” reflects this idea, and many of our programs and activities provide opportunities for students to “serve”—whether on campus, in the Durham community, or in the larger world.  Life, Short, Much, Little—every day we might ask, “How do I make today matter in the midst of all the things I have to do?”

Leadership through service is a deliberate way to cultivate many of the values students claim to want to develop in their goals for “improving the world,” “making a difference,” “becoming a good person,” “being a change agent,” or “following my passion!” Acts of service (or a serving orientation to life) take you outside yourself and your own little sphere to new communities and people who can teach you much about yourself, as well as about life as you do not know it.  And it IS “within our power” (i.e. LEADING your own life!) to find or create opportunities for this daily.

Service-Learning employs a reflection practice which helps us discover what matters, and what is within our power, as we describe, examine, and articulate our experiences.  Each of these steps can apply to any life experience, and I urge you to consider them in the context of your own efforts to “lead from within.”

Step One:   Describe.  Ask yourself, “What am I doing?”  (An internet guru recently said on NPR, “Attention is now the scarcest resource of all.”  So be intentional about objectively noticing what is going on in any particular moment (this is also called Mindfulness), and what details are significant—in your behaviors, attitudes,  the people you are with, the setting, how you are feeling. (This will, of course, require that you set aside your earphones and turn off your cell phone so that you can focus on the specifics!)  “I am sitting on the bus next to someone I don’t know and I am eager to get this next class over with so I can go to the gym.”  Or “I am tutoring a third-grader who can hardly speak English and I feel inadequate to help her learn to read.”

Step Two:  Examine. Ask yourself,What could I be doing differently—or better?  How can I enlarge my world to embrace more of this moment/opportunity/challenge?  Why am I feeling uncomfortable

/happy/relieved/eager—or nothing?”  As you focus on this step, be aware of the responses that emerge—“I could start a conversation with a stranger.”  “I want to take a walk in the gardens.”  “I could make some picture flash cards for the child I am tutoring.”  I am resisting identifying my feelings because that might interfere with what I need to be doing.”  “I’d like to write a note to a former teacher.”  “I want to know more about the Durham public schools.”

Step Three.  Articulate. Ask yourself, “What have I learned from this experience—about myself, about other people, about the way the world works, about the way this school/organization behaves?”  Then, “How can I apply any new insights and understandings to other experiences and moments?” What can I change—in myself, my environment, my relationships—that enable me to exercise what is “in our power”-- and to “make a difference”?

            The poets always say it best: 

Pay attention.
Be amazed.
Tell about it.
      --Mary Oliver

The DEAL model for Critical Reflection was developed by Dr. Patti Clayton and others, and can be explored more fully at http://www.ncsu.edu/cece/resources/deal_model.php.

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Add a dash of Meaning

I recently had the opportunity to travel with a group of five Duke students to the ACC Student Leadership Symposium at the University of Miami. Every year, the ACC universities send delegates to this conference to address societal issues by creating innovative solutions, think of their roles as leaders and change makers, and network across universities. UMiami hosted a jam-packed weekend of workshops, non-profits tours, a service project and student-group presentations on topics such as homelessness, education, and immigration. As a higher education professional, it was wonderful for me to be surrounded by such energy and motivation for positive change. These students were given a problem and tasked to find solutions and connections. Their advisors sat back and observed the light bulbs going off, realizing that this is what we want for all of our students always. How do we get our students to find meaning in everything that they do and not only when they are tasked to do so?

While the students were in workshops, the advisors were in one of their own tackling this question. We put on so many programs to make our students more well-rounded, insightful leaders, but are they actually working? Are we actually getting below the surface and helping them make meaning of the world around them? Our conversation turned to the idea of having Meaning-making Centers on college campuses. Nash and Lang wrote about such centers, envisioning a cross-campus curriculum housed in a place where students could go as they move through a meaning-making spectrum (2013, p. 6). Such centers would aim to create “self-aware, self-resolved, interculturally competent, global citizens who have a coherent philosophy of life, love, and learning” (p. 6).
After reading this and listening to the advisors discuss programs from their own campuses, I do not think we need whole centers devoted to this idea. It would just be adding another thing for our already busy and distracted students to think about. I think that there can be ways to be more intentional about meaning-making at the individual office level. Georgia Tech has a program where students are guided through a “This I Believe” activity to get at the heart of their values. The University of Pittsburgh has a leadership program that focuses on self-knowledge and integrity, among other things. Here at Duke, we have the Duke Authenticity Project where we spend a day challenging first-year students to explore and reveal their authentic self. These might not be campus-wide initiatives, but it can be difficult to dig into such deep notions in too large of a group. The smaller groups we impact will grow over time and ripple across campus on their own. Meaning-making can happen when we as administrators make values a priority, encourage reflection, and inspire students to think beyond their campus walls. I know I will continue to focus on the importance of meaning-making and I hope you will join me.

Resources:
Some excellent reflection tools- http://servicelearning.duke.edu/faculty/planning-resources (under Critical Reflection)
Gardner, W.L., Avolio, B.J., Luthans, F., May, D.R., & Walumbwa, F. (2005). “Can you see the real me?”: A self-based model of authentic leader and follower development. Leadership Quarterly, 16(2005), 343-372.
Nash, R.J. & Jang, J. J.J. (2013). The time has come to create meaning-making on college campuses. About Campus, Sept.-Oct. 2013, 2-9.
http://www.studentaffairs.pitt.edu/ccldel
http://www.leadership.gatech.edu/index.php

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Communicating Leadership

A few thoughts about how we think about ourselves

Have you ever looked at someone and said to yourself, “There is a natural leader!”?

How do you know? What characteristics does this person have to be in control of nearly any situation or event? Why do they impress you?

Leaders communicate themselves to others. They never simply say, “I am a leader,” but the way they act, react and interact or talk, smile and explain, demonstrates who they are. They engender in us a sense of trust that they will do what they say they will do.

Ted Talks are a big deal.  We admire those who are asked to make the presentations as leaders in their fields. Being chosen to give a Ted Talk validates the person’s skill and influence. But, there is a second thing we admire: people who we don’t know who give us valuable – even, for some, life changing – information. [Have you ever watched the one about how to tie your shoes?]

These are the two parts of communicating leadership: first, skill in explaining what you do and second, what you actually do.  Another way of saying this is both verbal and nonverbal communication matter.

Verbally
Know your purpose: you should be able to articulate what you want in a short sentence, active voice without using the verb “to be.”

Example: you are planning an event that brings in a speaker on X. The goal is not to have a successful event. What does this even mean? Say to yourself, “I want to change the way folks think about X.”

Rationale: you should have 3-4 reasons why you want that change. You may not articulate every reason to every audience, but they should be in your brain.

Example: there may be one reason that students might be interested in the event and a different reason the community might be there. Target each group individually.

Don’t be the only one who talks: when you talk about it, be short and allow for interchange and discussion.

Example: Never ask if there are any questions. Ask a specific question about what people think. Ask them if they think this is a good idea or if there are ways that you might improve how the event is presented.

Nonverbally
Be there: There is no leader who is admired more than someone who is around.

Don’t just give direction: Do something. Assign yourself a task or two to gather info for the planning phase or to prepare for the event.

But, delegate: This is not a condescending moment in which you tell people what to do; it is a time to invite people to participate, especially asking them what they want to contribute.

Yes, there is a fine line between communication that demonstrates control and that which appears arrogant. But, good leaders question this line all the time. Those who don’t are arrogant and risk never gaining the respect they need to be successful.

Click here to visit the Leader in Residence page.

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Framework Friday 1/31/14: “Do Good Leaders Haze?”

Last Friday, the UCAE Center for Leadership Development and Social Action collaborated with the Hazing Prevention Committee to discuss the issue of hazing with the Duke community.

As the last event of Duke’s Hazing Prevention Week (Jan. 27th to 31st), the discussion pulled members of the Duke community together to reflect on the knowledge that was shared throughout the week. We started off with Duke’s definition of hazing, provided by UCAE’s Jerrica Washington (which can also be found at http://studentaffairs.duke.edu/dos/hazing).

An open dialogue immediately followed this description. We focused on discerning what individuals/organizations hoped to achieve through hazing new members. Some suggested that these goals included: bringing a group closer together, testing the commitment levels of potential members, and providing an expedited process of “togetherness.”

Afterward, we shifted the focus to the group in order to list the instances of hazing that we’ve encountered and determine what could be done instead. For this broad question, we started with examples from the media, and then narrowed it down to life at Duke. For example, we talked about Jonathan Martin and his experiences with hazing in the NFL, as described in the media recently. We came to the conclusion that team-building exercises in a stress-free environment is a great alternative to such practices. At Duke, we mentioned our observations within student organizations, including the Greek community; but the highlight of the conversation came from an idea expressed in the Town Hall Discussion on Monday, Jan. 27th.

The idea was that Krzyzewskiville could be seen as Duke’s most public form of hazing. You have to go to great lengths in order to be a member of the Cameron Crazies. Sleep deprivation, the potential for sickness, and compromising situations are rampant in K-Ville, and yet it continues to thrive year after year. What do you think?

To close, Hazing Prevention Week is over, but the discussions must go on. Last week’s Framework Friday was more than just a time to reflect on what’s going on around us; it was a charge for leaders to keep asking themselves, “Could what I’m doing be considered hazing?” By keeping that question in mind, we can all make Duke a better, safer place for all students; both new and old.

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