Office of the Vice President

Past Kenan-Biddle Partnership Grantees

2013 Grantees

Cancer Pro Bono Legal Project
The law schools of both Duke and UNC, the cancer centers from the respective institutions and the NC Bar Association are partnering to create the Cancer Pro Bono Legal Project. Started in Washington DC at the George Washington University in 2011, the Cancer Pro Bono Legal Project aims to connect law students, under the supervision of licensed attorneys, with low-income cancer patients to aid in the creation of living wills, general power of attorney and healthcare power of attorney documents. In addition, the students and supervising attorneys will host "Know Your Rights" presentations, which aim to give patients valuable information about employee rights, health insurance and disability insurance rights and advanced care planning issues post diagnosis.

Advancing the Duke-UNC South Asian Classical Music Partnership
The South Asian classical music systems--Carnatic and Hindustani--are part of the major canonic systems, theoretically and practically well established at least since 200 AD, as exemplified in the treatise, The Natyasastra. These beautiful art forms are celebrated by the South Asian students of both Duke and UNC campuses, and by the South Asian diaspora in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. A number of Duke and UNC students and faculty have actually undergone detailed learning of the practice of these arts. However there has been very little academic development or student activity development in these arts. Until 2011, there was no organization committed to showcasing South Asian classical music in either Duke or UNC campus. Thus, we, the student musicians, faculty of music and dance, and ethnomusicologists together created a partnership effort, and we are committed to advance the "Duke-UNC South Asian Classical Music Partnership" to expose the student and faculty bodies to both campuses to South Asian classical music. By organizing interactive lecture demonstrations and immersion concerts, we can help the Duke and UNC community to become familiar with South Asian music, culture, diversity, and history. By holding symposia and professional workshops, we can enrich the music learning, teaching, and researching experience of the music departments in both universities, as their students and faculty gain regular exposure and insight into both Carnatic and Hindustani music. Overall, we strongly believe that this project will fill a long felt void, and foster an environment conducive for student-faculty engagement between campuses. The authors of this proposal have identified prospective partnerships and alternative funding sources that will aid in sustaining the goals over time.

United By The Beat
The potential of Bhangra lies not only in the physical expression of this art form, but also in the movement of celebration and community that it evokes. In order to reach out to a broader range of students, staff, and community members at both Duke and UNC, it would be meaningful to provide an accessible platform for these individuals to learn about and participate in the upbeat North Indian folk dance of Bhangra. By doing so, we hope to employ dance as a means of uniting marginalized or disparate communities while breaking the barriers between individuals at our universities. As such, we would like to propose a year-long endeavor that would provide a speaker series (dancers, artists, scholars) with discussion components, a Bhangra-themed open mic musician night, and a large collaborative exhibition performance with dance and musical groups from both universities. It is our hope that all of these activities would serve as a venue for dance, artistic excellence, and a network of individuals who can learn about a culture's rich history while also participating in a living, breathing innovation project--the evolution and celebration of Bhangra.

We are seeking to unite the officially recognized bhangra team student organizations at our respective universities. While there is a lot of passion for Punjabi and Indian culture within our groups, we are do not have a suitable platform to expand our knowledge and interests to the rest of the student body. We wish to share the culture and history of bhangra with students who are not necessarily from the same ethnic background but still have an interest in learning what we devote so much of our time towards. We would like to host an exhibition showcase annually with both of our dance teams in a venue accessible to both student populations. We would also like to offer instructional lessons and professional speakers to give students and community members the option to immerse themselves in the culture and history of Bhangra, both in its development and how it manifests itself in the competitive circuit today. We are hoping that Bhangra will no longer be seen as an unattainable dance form or a culture that is foreign to students who would take full advantage of the opportunity to explore a dance form that has been around for centuries.

China Leadership Summit
The Duke-UNC China Leadership Summit (CLS) is a three-day conference hosted at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. CLS aims to strengthen Duke-UNC collaboration by bringing together undergraduate and graduate students from Duke, UNC, and other regional colleges and Chinese universities with acute and demonstrated interests in US-China affairs and/or are respective leaders on their various campuses in related activities. CLS aims not only offer a series of esteemed US-China speakers to the general Duke and UNC public, but to generate interdisciplinary interest and discussion, create opportunities for research presentation and collaboration, and present networking opportunities to explore potential careers and other China-related opportunities for delegates and attendants. The conference will create a networking platform for members of both campuses (students, professors, and community members alike) to discuss issues related to the growing US-China rivalry and present and collaborate on innovative ideas for tackling future issues.

Bioethics Partnership
The Duke Undergraduate Bioethics Society and Carolina Undergraduate Bioethics Scholars seek to establish a strong collaborative relationship between Duke and UNC-CH undergraduate students in the field of bioethics. We hope that creating a genuine student interest in bioethics across both campuses will be a positive step in strengthening institutional ties between Duke and UNC-CH and also expose students to the challenges inherent in medicine and research. In addition to planning the annual Duke-UNC Bioethics Symposium, to be hosted at Duke University in the spring of 2013, the bioethics clubs at both institutions aim to develop a sustained year-long collaboration that extends beyond the conference. Through the implementation of monthly colloquia as well as the UNC-Duke Bioethics Symposium, the connection and unity between the two campuses will be further enhanced for the future.

Healthy Girls Engineering Change
Girls and young women face certain challenges and obstacles that their male counterparts do not. Historically women have been underrepresented in the sciences and struggle with body image issues, self-confidence, and nutritional/fitness personal responsibility. Empowering girls to have healthy body images will result in great self-confidence, and provide them with the abilities to succeed in areas they otherwise might not have seen as possible. These two issues may seem separate, but in actuality they are integrally related in that the empowerment of young women may give them new opportunities. Sustaining a healthy lifestyle and positive self-image helps to breed confidence and self-efficacy, self-efficacy (a person's belief in one's capabilities to learn or perform behaviors) in turn influences academic motivation, learning, and achievement. By providing an outlet to develop and sustain the tools and knowledge for a healthy active lifestyle while also teaching and exposing girls to the STEM field and technologies girls will become healthier, more interested in STEM academia, and maintain a positive self-image. Our proposal is to merge two existing programs, Healthy Girls Save the World (www.healthygirlssavetheworld.org) and Girls Engineering Change. By combining these two initiatives into one joint program where girls could participate in sessions encouraging healthy habits as well as imparting knowledge on the importance of STEM education, our collaborated initiative "Healthy Girls Engineering Change" will attempt to tackle a few of the many problems facing young females today.

Integrated History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Science Initiative
The graduate students and faculty members affiliated with this project aim to unite scholars working in the history and philosophy of science at Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill. By nature, the history and philosophy of science is a highly interdisciplinary field, and for this reason, researchers are often affiliated with a diverse array of departments, including English, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, Science and Technology Studies, and the sciences themselves. For many years, a substantial amount of HPS-related work has been done at UNC and Duke, however, because researchers are scattered among the institutions, and across various departments, communication has been lacking, and opportunities for mutually beneficial interaction have been missed. We are committed to changing this. With funding from the Kenan-Biddle Partnership, we would establish an ongoing research group, host a symposium, give several educational lectures, and hold a multi-day "Masterclass" on the history and philosophy of science to be led by a highly-regarded expert in the field. These activities would enrich the intellectual lives of the individuals currently working in these areas, and it would also serve as an introduction for those not already working in the field.

Introducing the Persian Culture to Duke and UNC
We'd like to meet the Duke and UNC campuses in spirit of Rumi's well composed quote-outside the negativity and subjective positivity. In an effort to foster relationship and spread the real merit and friendship of the Iranian community to the world and to wipe out the stereotypes about daily life in Iran, the Iranian students in Duke and UNC formed a team to make this happen. There was a general consensus amid us that we want to exhibit the true picture of Iran, which is very much a reality and not a delusionary wish. Our purpose during this month would be uniting the Duke and UNC community in happy celebrations of the diverse Persian culture and also creating educational events to increase awareness about Iran and its people. Four events spread over a month on our two campuses and the month-long campuses-wide exhibition of what it means to be Persian will be organized. There are about 100 first and second generation of Iranians on both campuses combined and there has been this general sense that our culture is gravely misunderstood. We'd like to bring out the diversity and give the communities on both campuses to hear our stories and clear misconceptions about Iran, the Iranian people, and the Iranian Diaspora. No other month, but March seemed appropriate for this as it is also the month that marks our Nowruz, the Persian New Year. We intend for our programs to be engaging and entertaining as will be outlined in the event section of this proposal.

NeuroCare Partnership
NeuroCare is an organization dedicated to helping people affected by neurological disorders. NeuroCare is the only existing organization that focuses on service and seeks opportunities to interact with patients and families in the greater community. While many academic organizations are focused on directing students through the field of neuroscience, there has been little opportunity for students to learn about neurological disorders from a first-person perspective. There are also many service organizations that allow students to serve the community in an educational and medical setting. NeuroCare strives to fuse neuroscience with service to those in need, allowing students to gain a broader perspective of not only the field of neuroscience, but also the local community. NeuroCare has collaborated with many organizations in the community, including but not limited to Central Regional Hospital, Bridge II Sports, Duke Counseling and Psychological Services, Duke Psychiatric Department, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Carolina Neuroscience Club, Duke Neuroscience Majors' Union, Durham Academy, and E.K. Powe Elementary School. Through our work in the Duke, UNC, and broader Triangle community, NeuroCare aims to reach out to a wide audience, encompassing the greater North Carolinian community, as well as students who are not only interested in neuroscience, but who also want to make a positive impact on the lives of those afflicted by neurological disorders. We believe NeuroCare provides students with a valuable learning experience while providing a valuable service to those in need.

Sharing the Mantle through Global Connections: Collective Leadership Models for Youth and Adult Partnerships in Social Justice
This leadership conference is a continuation of a project that began as a student-led initiative in 2009 aimed at empowering African American high-school aged women in public housing neighborhoods in Chapel Hill to become leaders and advocates for community-based social change. Beginning in January 2013, we propose an expansion of this idea to emphasize a global connections theme, by supporting leadership development among youth from various ethnic, geographic, and cultural backgrounds in the Triangle area, as well as young women at the Women's Institute for Secondary Education and Research (WISER) in Muhuru Bay, Kenya. This is a partnership involving Duke and UNC student leaders, the UNC Department of Communication Studies, the Ella Baker Women's Center for Leadership and Community Activism (EBWC), and the Duke WISER service learning partnership.

Joint MD/PhD Training Initiative
UNC and Duke are at the forefront of training physician-scientists--the clinicians whom fast-track basic biomedical research into patient therapies. Yet, despite the mere 12 miles that separate these two great institutions, there are currently no formal interactions between UNC and Duke MD/PhD students. Undergraduates from both institutions suffer from lack of exposure to the physician scientist career path and the mentoring required to successfully apply for MD/PhD training programs. Furthermore, there is a lack of public knowledge about the importance, methods, and ethics of basic research in advancing human health, and the public support required to train and maintain the physician scientist pool that will contribute to the medical discoveries of tomorrow. In this proposal, we outline a joint venture by UNC and Duke MD/PhD students to 1) educate and mentor undergraduates about the physician-scientist career, 2) establish regular collaborative scientific and career development meetings between the UNC and Duke MD/PhD programs, and 3) present our student research and advocate for the role of the physician scientist in medical advancement to the lay public. If chosen by the Kenan-Biddle partnership, our proposed activities will serve as proof of principle to the respective leadership at UNC and Duke Schools of Medicine for equal-matched financial support for a future long-term collaboration.

 

2012 Grantees

LGBTQ and Ally Leadership Retreat
The spring leadership development retreat is a joint project of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer student groups at UNC-Chapel Hill (GLBTSA), Duke University (Blue Devils United), as well as other North Carolina universities. The project aims to connect and strengthen bonds between LGBTQ-identified people and their allies on each campus in order to create a more cohesive network of individuals. We believe that with strengthened bonds between LGBTIQ college students, we will be able to be more effective advocates on campus and in the wider world. In order to coordinate this retreat, we are requesting $5,770 in funding from the Kenan-Biddle Grant. We have already received $3,000 in funding for the retreat from the Alliance for Full Acceptance (for further information, see: http://www.affa-sc.org/affa/index.htm).

Emerging Scholars of Media and Technology
This grant application proposes the formation of a consortium for graduate students working in/on media and technologies at Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill. We would sponsor:

  • a series of graduate student meetings, designed to develop and cement ongoing relationships among media studies students in the Triangle;
  • a website, available as both a clearinghouse for advertising area events to students anda sandbox for testing ideas and designs;
  • three “themed” workshops, curated by a student or group of students, which will providea broad introduction to various historical or theoretical concepts in media and technologystudies;
  • three technology skills workshops open to the entire Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill communities, led by knowledgeable faculty, staff, students or Triangle-area technologists;
  • a culminating symposium, open to the entire community, in which to discuss the process of interdisciplinary digital scholarship and review the past and future of the consortium.

Triangle Race Conference
Graduate students from University of North Carolina (UNC), Duke University, and North Carolina Central University (NCCU), have come together to apply for funding from the Kenan-Biddle grant, along with sponsorships from other sources, to host a conference on the interdisciplinary study of race. The conference will highlight graduate student research on race and ethnicity as a way to promote inter-university collaboration, interdisciplinary research, and graduate student scholarship.  This year’s theme will be “Research and Resistance: Race Across the Disciplines.”  We anticipate the conference serving as an important step toward establishing interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration on race scholarship, with the ultimate goal of addressing problems of racial inequality locally, nationally, and globally.

The Duke-UNC South Asian Classical Music Partnership
The South Asian classical music systems – Carnatic and Hindustani – are part of the major canonic systems, theoretically and practically well established at least since 200 AD, as exemplified in the treatise, The Natyasastra. These beautiful art forms are celebrated by the South Asian students of both Duke and UNC campuses, and by the South Asian diaspora in the  Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. A number of Duke and UNC students and faculty have actually undergone detailed learning of the practice of these arts. However there has been very little academic development or student activity development in these arts. Presently, there is no organization committed to showcasing South Asian classical music in the Duke or UNC campus. Thus, we, the student musicians, faculty of music and dance, and ethnomusicologists together propose to create the “Duke-UNC South Asian Classical Music Partnership” to expose the student and faculty bodies to both campuses to South Asian classical music. By organizing interactive lecture demonstrations and immersion concerts, we can help the Duke and UNC community to become familiar with South Asian music, culture, diversity, and history. By holding symposia and professional workshops, we can enrich the music learning, teaching, and researching experience of the music departments in both universities, as their students and faculty gain regular exposure and insight into both Carnatic and Hindustani music. Overall, we strongly believe that this project will fill a long felt void, and foster an environment conducive for student-faculty engagement between campuses. The authors of this proposal have identified prospective partnerships and alternative funding sources that will aid in sustaining the goals over time. Thus, we request the Kenen-Biddle Partnership Committee to consider this proposal favorably.

Mobile Savings Innovations
The Community Empowerment Fund (CEF) is a student-run microfinance nonprofit that cultivates opportunities, assets, and communities, which concurrently support the alleviation of homelessness and poverty. CEF meets its mission by providing savings opportunities, micro loans, financial education, and case management support to individuals who are homeless or at risk of experiencing homelessness. Having received support from the Kenan-Biddle Partnership to launch the Durham branch of CEF, we are re-applying for funding to take this initiative to scale. We aim to strengthen the established connection between CEF at Duke and UNC by integrating technological innovations into CEF’s mobile savings program.

UNC-Duke Immigrant Advocacy Network
Students United for Immigrant Equality and Duke Students for Humane borders wish to collaborate through this joint grant proposal to attain resources that will allow our respective organizations to cooperate on programming that will focus on immigrant rights. As social justice organizations that are advocating for the fair and just treatment of immigrants in our state, we know that if we combine our efforts and resources, we will be able to engage more students at our campuses. Our focus will be to engage both of our campuses on immigration issues by providing our student bodies with a more humanistic view on this topic.

Campus and Community in Comedic Collaboration "C4"
Currently, only few avenues exist for Duke University and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) students to engage in the scholarly aspects of comedy or enjoy comedic performances. In the spirit of the Kenan-Biddle partnership, Duke sketch comedy group Inside Joke and UNC’s Rooftop Comedy Team jointly propose a series of seminars and performances focusing on the artistic qualities of comedic writing to promote inter-institutional collaboration as well collaboration with the surrounding local community. Our goal is to inspire intellectual conversations regarding the theory and practice of comedic writing and performance. These seminars and performances will spark creativity, entertain the campus and local communities, and allow both universities to provide a wider range of educational and creative opportunities.

UNC Duke China Leadership Summit
The Duke-UNC China Leadership Summit (CLS) is a three-day conference hosted at Duke University and the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. CLS aims to strengthen Duke-UNC collaboration by bringing together undergraduate and graduate students from Duke, UNC and Chinese universities with acute and demonstrated interests in US-China affairs. CLS will not only offer a series of esteemed US-China speakers to the general Duke and UNC public, but will generate interdisciplinary interest and discussion, create opportunities for research presentation and collaboration, and present networking opportunities to explore potential careers and other China-related opportunities for delegates and attendants. The conference will create a platform for members of both campuses (students, professors, and community members alike) to discuss issues related to the growing US-China rivalry and present innovative ideas for tackling future issues.

Choosing for Health: A Nutrition Education and Youth Empowerment Initiative in Durham and Chapel Hill
The students of the You Are What You Eat (YAWYE) Duke Nutrition Education Program at Duke University School of Medicine and the students of the Nutrition Coalition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wish to collaborate on the expansion of an in-school nutrition education program at Durham School of the Arts and creation of an after-school cooking program for area middle school students. The in-school nutrition education program will continue to provide sixth, seventh and eighth grade students at Durham School of the Arts with the tools to make better food choices and develop healthy eating habits. The cooking program component will complement the foundation of knowledge gained in the classroom by introducing middle school students from the Duke-Durham partnership schools and youth that attend Wellness Wednesdays at the Chapel Hill YMCA to the fun and ease of cooking with hands-on cooking projects and cooking demonstrations. Both components will ultimately promote the practical nutrition knowledge necessary to empower Durham and Chapel Hill adolescents in their healthy decision-making practices. To encourage the widespread adoption of the nutrition curriculum used at Durham School of the Arts and in selected Chapel Hill middle schools and youth attending Wellness Wednesdays at the Chapel Hill YMCA, web modules will be created for the benefit of Durham and Chapel Hill public schools and also the academic community.

The Scientists with Stories Project: a media training collaboration at the coastal laboratories of Duke & UNC-Chapel Hill
Science communication is an increasingly important component of the broader impact of scientific research projects -- and the grants that fund them. Most science curricula at the PhD level lack any programs to help young scientists develop the skills needed to communicate via newly dominant mediums of communication: digital photography, web videography, podcasts, and blogging. The PhD students affiliated with Duke’s and UNC’s coastal laboratories experience extra challenges when seeking to acquire media skills outside of their academic curriculum. Geographic isolation prohibits these students from utilizing main campus resources, including media-relevant courses, media equipment loans, and interaction with faculty at Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and UNC’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication (SJMC).

Our end goal is to foster the notion that the process of scientific inquiry is, essentially, a story. To this end, we must work across campuses to transform the next generation of young scientists into storytellers. This proposed collaboration creates an intensive training workshop and professional exhibition opportunities for PhD students affiliated with the Duke University Marine Laboratory (DUML) and the UNC’s Institute of Marine Sciences (IMS). The program leverages existing institutional and student assets, such as connections with workshop instructors, student and faculty blogging platforms, optimal training spaces, video-link systems, and student-ready media equipment. The January-through-December program model caters to those PhD students committed to producing a polished media product. Most marine science students can design their media projects around summer fieldwork, which will be bookended by training, exhibition events, and support meetings during the spring and fall semesters. The Scientists with Stories (SwS) project idea was developed in September 2011 during a recently revived inter-laboratory student symposium convening DUKE/UNC students. This proposed initiative is designed to build off of our common search for outreach skills and a renewed enthusiasm for increased collaboration between the two university laboratories in Carteret County.

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2011 Grantees

Sharing the Mantle for Positive Peace: Collective Leadership Models for Youth and Adult Partnerships in Preventing Youth Violence
This is a continuation of a project aimed at empowering high school aged young women in public housing neighborhoods in Chapel Hill to become leaders and advocates for community-based social change.

Beginning in January, 2011, we propose a collaboration to support leadership development with approximately ten to fifteen young women from the Trinity Court, Pritchard Park, and South Estes communities, along with Duke and UNC student leaders, the UNC Department of Communication Studies, and the Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism (EBWC). Faculty members, Dr. Broverman and Dr. Parker, will partner with Duke and UNC undergraduates, youth participants, and staff of the EBWC in the planning and implementation of the 2nd Biennial “Sharing the Mantle Conference” (The inaugural conference was produced in 2009 under the auspices of the Department of Communication Studies, with partial support from the Robertson Collaboration Fund).

Shifting Trends: an Experiment in After-school Computer Literacy Programs
The students of Technology Without Borders (TWB), a Campus Y committee, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the students of the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Initiative at Duke University, wish to collaborate in the joint creation of an afterschool program at Carter Community School in Durham, NC. The program will increase computer literacy skills of fourth and fifth grade students by developing a curriculum designed to address the increasing prevalence of computers in modern society. TWB and OLPC will create an afterschool program that benefits the Durham community; we will also publish an exportable computer literacy curriculum for the benefit of the academic community.

Duke/UNC-Chapel Hill Working Group in Contemporary Poetry
This grant application seeks to facilitate the formation of the Duke/UNC-Chapel Hill Working Group in Contemporary Poetry. The working group will bridge both communities, offering poetry-related events throughout the Spring and Fall semesters of 2011.  The proposed activities, to be supported by this grant, are a continuation and elaboration of those already sponsored in part by the Duke English Department. This expansion will require, amongst other things, the renting of a venue in Chapel Hill, and an increased emphasis on outreach and promotion.  In addition to subsidizing these organizational expenses, the grant will also serve to support an annual inter-institutional colloquium, a concentrated two-day event in which nationally prominent scholars, poets and publishers will discuss topics relevant to their practice.

Females Excelling More in Math, Engineering, and Science (FEMMES)
Females Excelling More in Math, Engineering and Science (FEMMES) is a student designed and implemented educational outreach organization that creates hands-on activities for 4th-6th grade girls from underserved public schools to allow them to explore their potential in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) subjects. The Duke chapter has partnered with undergraduate women at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to build a new FEMMES chapter targeting Carrboro, Chapel Hill, and Orange County residents. As the two chapters grow, we will help one another create and improve the after-school and summer programs. By sharing materials and ideas, such as hands-on experiments and new funding sources, the two programs will transfer knowledge, creating a shared partnership working towards closing the gender gap in STEM fields. Funds from the Kenan Biddle grant will be used primarily to support the UNC FEMMES chapter, and the remainder of the funds will be used to partially support Duke’s capstone in February.

Triangle University Food Studies
We propose to build on strong existing collaborations to further develop and sustain the Triangle University Food Studies group, and launch innovative student led ventures testing solutions to the challenges identified.

PRIMATE PALOOZA: Multi-disciplinary approaches to biodiversity conservation
Myriad species are on the brink of extinction. In response to conservation concerns, a group of Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill students formed a Roots & Shoots group in April 2009. Roots & Shoots is a program of the Jane Goodall Institute that empowers people of all ages to effect positive change for people, animals and the environment.  Collaborating with Dr. Anne Pusey, chair of the Evolutionary Anthropology department at Duke University, and in conjunction with a visit by Jane Goodall planned for March 28, 2011, we will host Primate Palooza at both Duke and UNC.  Primate Palooza is a week-long celebration of primates and biodiversity conservation.  Events will include (1) a chimpanzee themed Public Service Announcement-making contest, (2) a music and dance performance, (3) seminars on interdisciplinary conservation strategies and (4) work-days at the Duke Lemur Center. Primate Palooza will showcase the intersection between science, policy, education, and art, going past the usual interdisciplinary partnerships.  These collaborations will also be inter-institutional, and show the power that can come from undergraduates and faculty from both Duke and UNC working together.

The Community Empowerment Fund: Durham Branch
We propose to launch the Community Empowerment Fund (CEF), a student run microfinance intiative that offers microloans, savings opportunities, financial education, and case management support to individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, in Durham as a collaborative project between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. Through CEF Durham we will pair student volunteers with individuals living on the street, in a shelter, or in housing transition. The pairs form accountability partnerships, building relationships that provide social support while assisting unbanked communities toward self-sufficiency.

Examining Undergraduate Involvement in the Grassroots Movement for Global Health Equity
Through the Kenan-Biddle Partnership Grant, GlobeMed at Duke and GlobeMed at UNC will collaborate on a series of events that will educate students on diverse approaches to international aid and engage them in discussions surrounding the ethics of their involvement as undergraduates in global health projects. GlobeMed is a national student-driven nonprofit that works to achieve global health equity through pragmatic partnerships between university chapters and grassroots organizations in impoverished communities worldwide. GlobeMed at Duke is partnered with Salud Sin Límites, a community-based organization that provides general health needs to the rural area of Siuna, Nicaragua.

GlobeMed at UNC works with Health Alert Uganda in Gulu, Uganda providing healthcare to women and children infected and affected with HIV/AIDS. These organizations are similar in their grassroots approach—a trademark of every GlobeMed partner—but they also have several commonalities in their operations such as peer health education, a focus on nutrition, and working with the prevention of, testing for, and treatment of HIV/AIDS. GlobeMed as a national organization is very concerned with building a strong community amongst all its chapters, fostered through a yearly National Summit and Leadership Institute as well as regional conferences and constant communication and sharing of information. Based on this already-existing cooperation between chapters and the opportunities that would be provided by the Kenan-Biddle partnership grant, we anticipate making strong impact on both universities and their respective communities as a result of this collaboration.

Duke-UNC Bhutanese Empowerment Project (BEP)
The Bhutanese Empowerment Project (BEP) is a nation-wide effort to help resettle the recently arrived Bhutanese refugees to the United States. Since Spring 2009, the Hindu Students Association at Duke University and the Hindu YUVA team at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, have been actively engaged in the resettlement of a Bhutanese refugee community in Raleigh, North Carolina. Apart from weekly tutoring sessions for the Bhutanese children, we have been organising events to help these students better adapt to the American way of life. We hope to expand our efforts through the Kenan-Biddle grant to better cater to the needs of this vulnerable population. Programs include a more comprehensive tutoring plan along with a focus on Individualised Education Plans, the hiring of a Nepalese speaking work study student, seminars on education and other social activities. These programs will go a long way in helping these refugees circumvent many of the side-effects of relocation and culture shock, whilst developing a sense of belonging to the American society. This project will also serve to strengthen ties between not only the two universities but also with the greater community in the triangle area.

Duke and UNC-CH Students Working for Sustainable Agriculture
The Duke chapter of ExciteDevelopment (formerly Engineers Without Borders), and the UNC student organization SWEAT (Students Working in the Environment for Active Transformation), plan to collaborate on the establishment of a SWEAT chapter on the Duke campus beginning January of 2011.  Students from each school will be integral in forming this sister organization to UNC’s chapter, with dual goals in mind: organizing joint service learning projects aimed at engineering sustainability, and having an influential, awareness-based presence on both campuses.