Internationals Celebrating An American Tradition: Thanksgiving

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Ada Aka
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Let me start by sharing two things that comes up to my mind when I think about Thanksgiving. Firstly, as an international student whose home is approximately 5,430 miles away from Duke, I am always nervous about being left alone during short breaks like Thanksgiving when none of the on-campus eateries, stores, libraries are open for their regular hours and almost all of my friends leave campus to go back to their homes. This year, fortunately, International House organized an amazing Thanksgiving meal on Wednesday, Nov 26th, for a group of internationals that included undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty. I thought the event was a great success!

There were many delicious traditional American Thanksgiving foods such as turkey with gravy, green beans with garlic and parmesan, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes with marshmallows and pecans, macaroni & cheese and a variety of pies for dessert. The best part was that lovely IHouse staff cooked all of this food in their homes and brought them in, just like a real Thanksgiving meal in someone’s house. We met with people from all around the world, had interesting and enjoyable conversations while eating delicious food.

The second thing I remember every Thanksgiving is related to the main dish of this day: the turkey. As a Turkish myself, Thanksgivings are always in a sense stressful for me since whenever someone talks about the turkey they ate, I immediately attend to the conversation because it could be something related to my country, Turkey. Last year, I decided to research why this traditional Thanksgiving food is named with my country and whether it is named after Turkey (the country). This is really intriguing for me because in Turkish, a turkey is called “Hindi” which refers to India. I found that New York Times’ Mark Forsyth wrote a beautiful and informative op-ed to answer these questions. It turns out that this exotic bird is imported all the way from Madagascar, off the southeast coast of Africa to Europe by merchants from Turkey, so the name of this bird stayed as Turkey. Ironically, French and Turkish people thought that turkeys came from India so they call it dinde and hindi respectively.

All in all, we had a great time in International House to celebrate Thanksgiving together as internationals. I would like to thank all IHouse staff for this nice event! I wish a Happy Thanksgiving for everyone with amazing people and delicious food. ☺

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