Ms. Trezza’s Kindergarten Class, Fall 1999

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Lauren King ‘16
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About Me! Worksheet

I found this worksheet at the back of my closet a few days before I left for college in Fall 2012.  Aside from a slightly better understanding of spelling, nothing much had changed in thirteen years, particularly my aspiration of becoming a doctor.  So, when I arrived at Duke, I was eager to start on the pre-med journey.  I, along with 300 other freshmen, excitedly (and naïvely, as I now know that nothing good can happen for me on Science Drive) walked up the long flight of stairs to Gross Chem to attend Chem 101.

As you may have realized already, I quickly found out that the long flight of stairs to what I thought would be an introduction to my career as a doctor was actually the flight of stairs to doom.  I learned that I couldn’t form any type of bond, covalent or ionic (get it?), with this class.  While my classmates were busy completing reaction equations and others sorts of smart chemistry things that I didn’t understand, I was busy flailing my arms in despair at the thought of continuing to take confusing classes that I was not passionate about for the next four years of my life.  I realized that I would have to look beyond my lifelong dream of being a doctor in search of something different.

Fast forward to present day, and I am now two years older, wiser, and an Economics major (so maybe not THAT wise).  Unlike freshman Lauren, I now have absolutely no idea what I want to do in the future.  I worked up a sweat running around the career fair as I stopped at every booth in every industry, from retail to banking, and I’ve spent many hours talking to whoever happens to be sitting next to me (to the freshman on the C1 two weeks ago: I’m sorry if I scared you) about the giant question mark that is my future.  Luckily, that person who’s sitting next to me has also become members of the staff at the Career Center, who are always there to listen to my latest debacles in my career search before reassuring me that whenever one door closes, another one opens.  I’ve found that it’s important to not be afraid of new opportunities and possibilities.  What I may want to do might be completely different from every other Economics major, but it’s also completely okay to try something new.  The most important thing about my choice is that it is something that I will enjoy, and as long as I am confident in my choice, success—and more importantly, happiness—will naturally follow.

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