10 Best Job Search Sites for Duke Students

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Jennifer Agor, Assistant Director, Duke Career Center
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One question we often get in the Career Center is, “Where do I search for available jobs?” The answer really depends on what you’re looking for, but there are many resources for job seekers.

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The Duke Career Center offers a job portal called CareerConnections, which hosts all of the job postings specifically for Duke students as well as all On-Campus Recruiting for the university.  This resource holds job postings for both full-time and internship positions, company information and hiring history, recruiter contacts, and an event calendar that shows you both employer-hosted and Career Center events.

While On-Campus Recruiting is great, I would never recommend that you only apply to jobs through the university, as this represents only a small percentage of companies which exist. 

So, where else do you find jobs?

LinkedIn can be a great resource for positions. You can set your search parameters and it populates the jobs page with positions that fit.  It can also help identify people who are associated with those companies, making it a bit easier to network and identify who you might be connected with. Consider joining the Duke University Alumni Network, to connect with members who have been in your shoes.

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If you’re interested in startups, Angel List is the primary job search website, again for both full-time and intern positions. The Innovation & Entrepreneurship office at Duke also hears about positions all the time, and each semester they create a web page called Internship Startup Rodeo which hosts information on all types of startup openings, most of whom are seeking Dukies.

For the more social minded individual, Idealist is a search engine that focuses on nonprofit positions across the United States.

USAJobs is the main portal for government focused positions.  Both state and federal positions are listed here.

Professional organizations (like National Society for Black Engineers, Association for Financial Professionals, or International Game Developers Association) often have conferences and job boards associated to their related industry, which may be linked on their websites.  If you aren’t familiar with organizations in your field, ask your faculty, Google it, or speak to professionals in the field for their best recommendations.

Also, general job search sites like Indeed, Glassdoor and others can give you a wider net to cast.  You’ll do a little more sifting to find appropriate positions, but these sites also help with reviews, salary information, and other company specific tidbits.

Undergraduate Drop-in Career Advising. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday 1-4pm

Hopefully, this gives you a few new ideas for your job search.  Keep exploring, and feel free to come to Drop-in Advising, set up an individual appointment with a career adviser or come to one of the many Career Center events to get more advice.

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