Blog

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

You might think the signs of exhaustion are obvious, but sleep deprivation isn’t as obvious as you might think it is. Its effects creep up on us. Here are a few common manifestations of this sleep deprivation monster. 

You fidget a lot. And you don’t normally. 
You might think this is a reflection of your energy that just can’t be contained. But it can actually be a symptom of chronic sleep loss. Your body is going into to hyper-drive. Can’t stop moving might mean you need to stop. 

Blog Author:
Kate Sayre, MPH, RDN, LDN

Beginning next Monday, February 16th, Nutrition Services is partnering with many offices across campus to host a positive body image week.  In the past, we’ve celebrated National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, but found that students are already aware of eating disorders.  Renaming the week and focusing on learning to embrace our bodies can help students to move away from some of the behaviors that might increase risk of developing disordered eating and exercise patterns.

Here’s a breakdown of the events we have going on next week, all of which are free and do not require tickets.

Monday, February 16th:

Blog Author:
Isabella Kwai, '16

Let me be entirely honest and open in what I’m about to say. Honesty after all, is so little found in conversations about mental health and yet so powerful when it is. I have, like 1 in 4 other young people my age, struggled with my mental health on and off. There have been times when I’ve been sick with hopelessness and misery, consumed with self-loathing and hatred. Likewise, there have times when I’ve been ecstatically happy and grateful. My emotional health is a mental rollercoaster and contains the best and worst memories for me. But it is not all of me.

Blog Author:
Jake Schapiro, Peer For You Peer Responder

Peer For You is now welcoming applications for Peer Responders to serve Duke students for next year.

Applications due March 16. Apply now.

We are a student-run resource that provides the space for undergraduate students to reach out for support and referrals in times of struggle. Any Duke student can send an anonymous message to one of our Peer Responders about a struggle or challenge that they are currently facing. The approached Peer Responder will respond to the message within 24 hours.

Blog Author:
Danna Alvarado, ABSN ‘14

I don’t know where to start. I was asked to write about my experience with an eating disorder, but it’s complicated. I’m anorexic, and I have been for exactly half of my life—thirteen years. To me, there’s not much to tell. I’ve known this world so intimately for so long that I simply see it as my state of being. It’s difficult to distinguish where the eating disorder stops and I begin. So, I guess I should start at the beginning…

Blog Author:
Mazella Fuller, PhD., MSW, LCSW, CEDS, Integrative Health Coach

Awareness

I am aware that I am the only one responsible for what has and will happen in my life. It is empowering to know I am in full control of my destiny. –Carol Joy

Black Women at Duke! Are you managing your stress well…to avoid the risk of developing eating issues? I am a CAPS clinician and have been working with women of color struggling with eating issues for over 20 years. The issues of perfectionism and always feeling that you need to be in control are the same for all women and especially Duke women.  Duke women are leaders and strive for excellence and perfection in all endeavors, which can make some women at Duke vulnerable to eating problems.

Blog Author:
Chris Heltne

Thumbnail A healthy mind, body and spirit are the foundation of success. As Duke students--undergraduate, graduate and professional--you have available a broad range of health services, program and resources to use help, guide, motivate and otherwise provide positive habits that can lead you to good health today, and for a lifetime.

by Kaitlin Gladney

Thumbnail If you knew one in four of your peers suffered from some form of a particular illness—an illness that, when left untreated, can make everyday life an overwhelming challenge and even result in death—what would you do? How would you feel if people wrote this illness off as a sign of weakness or were uncomfortable discussing it?

A Talk with Sharon Salzberg Offered for Duke Students

“...a life of connection and authenticity can come completely alive for us now. Discovering that our hearts are indeed wide enough to embrace the whole world of experience—both pleasurable and painful—is the basis of extraordinary freedom and happiness.” – Sharon Salzberg

Start Off the Year Learning To Live Life
With Less Stress and More Complete Well-Being.

The syllabi and schedules of the Fall semester will soon pull you into anticipating what will happen next, dreading what you have to get done.

This talk will introduce concepts and life approaches, including mindfulness meditation, to help you move toward valuing your sense of place here at Duke, your connections with each other, and the gratification of learning.