Blog

Blog Author:
Ye Zhang, M.A. Economics ‘12

Thumbnail As a person who wants to study policy related to mental health and make a change back in China, I felt that I needed some advice on my career development from experts. This led me to the Duke Career Center where I met Paul Miceli.

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Blog Author:
Samantha Bowen, Ph.D. ‘13

Thumbnail Starting at an early point in the course of my Ph.D., I was very aware that I did not want to pursue an academic career path. In fact, I had a good idea of this before I even started graduate school.

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Blog Author:
Ashley Lewis ‘14

Thumbnail Towards the end of my sophomore year I decided that I liked the Career Center so much, that I wanted to work there. So, I applied to become a member of the Career Ambassador Team.

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Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

It’s that time of the year again when we all start to hear the question… The one that if you’re like me and knee-deep in internship applications, can put your stomach in knots: “You have plans for the summer?”

Excuse me while I binge on Downton Abbey episodes and Trader Joe’s dried mango slices. I will do all the dishes, scoop up the dog poop, and stare down those creepy squirrels that jump out of the trash cans on West Campus. Just don’t remind me that I. Don’t. Know. Because let’s be honest, there are few things that Duke students like less than not being on top of things. And now, with lots of internships to find and emails to write, it’s not only “not on top,” it feels like I’m at flat bottom.

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By Tammy J. Samuels, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center

Talking about one’s failures is not an easy thing to do.  In fact, you would probably prefer to leave it out of almost any conversation.  When it comes to telling your story as a job seeker, showcasing your failure may not be all that bad. Now, does this mean you dump your failures into the conversation without purpose or meaning?  Absolutely not.  There’s a time and a place for everything and the interview is most likely the best place for it.  Typically, in the interview, you are likely to get the question about weaknesses, which would seem the most obvious place to insert failures however, what if you don’t get the question?  Do you still want to talk about failure?  I say yes!

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Blog Author:
Annie Maxfield, former Assistant Director, Graduate Student Career Services

How employers are finding talent through experience based interviews

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By Ellen Mishler ‘13, Economics Major, part of the Peer Advice Series

Thumbnail It was one of those mornings. The C-1 was running late and I had forgotten to print out my resume before my appointment at the Career Center. I sat down across from Anita completely empty handed and although I don’t remember the exact words I used, it was probably something along the lines of—help me.

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Blog Author:
Nadine Verna, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center

 

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I spent the previous week studying for finals and writing papers with limited sleep, but when I handed in my last assignment, I felt a mixture of relief and resignation. 

“Thank you,” the department secretary said, “You’re all set.” 
“That’s it?” I asked.
“That’s it!” She replied cheerfully.

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