Blog

It's already November! That means the fall semester is almost over and you may be asking yourself how you missed August, September, and October. Don't worry, it's easy for the semester to fly by so fast; especially with all of the opportunities on campus. To provide you with a quick recap UCAE Student Involvement has compiled a few infographics of semester highlights. Hopefully this fills you with some nostalgia for the past semester and encourages you to seek out new opportunities in the spring. 

Blog Author:
McCall Hollie, Duke Univ Women's Center Intern, Class of 2016

We had just wrapped up at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, drained from taking in all the incredible history exhibited in the museum’s three buildings. The consensus was to take the tram to a spot for lunch, then hop on it again to find a baklava shop we’d heard is amazing. The tram is one of several fantastic methods of public transportation used by what feels like everyone (at the same time) in the city of Istanbul. A seat on the bus, metro, or tram is a highly coveted spot that is not easily attained. In fact, sometimes just getting on any of these vehicles is a nearly impossible feat because they are so crowded. “Maximum Capacity” doesn’t seem to be a concept as firmly held here as it is in the U.S.

Departments:
Blog Author:
Sean Novak and India Pierce

 

Collaboration & Change for a Common Good
A Reflection on Collaboration in Campus Life
India Pierce and Sean Novak

 

One way that we can work effectively to create change for a common good is to work collaboratively across communities. With this in mind, India Pierce from the Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity (CSGD) came together with Sean Novak from the Center for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) to create a program that explored the intersections of race and sexual orientation. As part of the CMA’s En/Countering Racism series (E/C), they created a program for students to gather and explore intersectionality. This was done in order to deepen participants’ understanding of themselves and others as a means to building stronger coalitions for social justice.

For this blog post, some of the interns at the Women’s Center decided to share our personal history with feminism. We have all had different experiences and there isn’t a singular theme among our stories, but we hope that our experiences encourage others in the Duke community to explore what feminism means to them.

 

From Colleen O’Connor (Community Building and Organizing Intern): `

 

Blog Author:
Kyle Fox

This summer has been fairly chaotic around the Bryan Center as the building underwent a massive facelift. When you get to campus this August it’s likely that you won’t even recognize the building. In fact, you’ll probably have many questions. “Where is the post office? Where is the UCAE Finance Team? Where did this futuristic chair come from? Where is all of that natural light coming from?” All good questions that I’m hoping to clear up a little with this blog post; however, you really need to stop by in person on Monday, August 26th for the grand reopening and check it all out for yourself.

Where is everything? That’s a very complex question, but here’s a brief answer: Upstairs, downstairs, and all over the BC. A longer and more detailed answer would layout the location of all of the changes, so here we go:

By Write(H)ers participant Adrienne Harreveld, T'15

 

With the Supreme Court hearings on issues of marriage equality, my entire Facebook newsfeed has become a sea of red equal signs, a notorious symbol of the Human Rights Campaign. One friend jokingly made the comment the influx of HRC red equal signs is like the Facebook version of passover. While it’s great to see so many of my Facebook friends are on the side of marriage equality, there are two things I find slightly troubling: 1) how quickly my  friends seem to buy into facebook or social media activism trends, otherwise known as “slacktivism” (think KONY 2012) and 2) The Human Rights Campaign itself.

My guess is if my friends knew more about some of the executive decisions made by the HRC, they would be less likely to promote its social media kitsch.

Departments:

Shortly after the World Trade Center complex was completed, acrobat Philippe Petit tight-roped across the gap between the two buildings, a quarter mile above the New York City streets.

Your character is a life-long project.

Make it an authentic one.

The Duke Authenticity Project asks you, the first-year student, to dig deep, discover, and explore your values and how they contribute to how you practice leadership. You will join in small and large group discussions, participate in educational workshops, and experience guided reflection with Duke faculty and staff. You will learn how values manifest in your daily life, and how your personal commitment to authenticity is core to your ability to lead, and lead well.

Learn to trust your truth. Sign up for the Duke Authenticity Project.