Blog

Blog Author:
Cyan DeVeaux

Hey everyone!

My name is Cyan and I am currently a freshman here at Duke. I’m from New York so I’m a bit far from home, but my experiences at Duke make it worth the travel. What I really love about my school, and part of my decision to come here, had to do with all of the opportunities that are offered. I came here telling myself to take advantage of the resources that I have while I can.

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Blog Author:
McCall Hollie, Duke Univ Women's Center Intern, Class of 2016

We had just wrapped up at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, drained from taking in all the incredible history exhibited in the museum’s three buildings. The consensus was to take the tram to a spot for lunch, then hop on it again to find a baklava shop we’d heard is amazing. The tram is one of several fantastic methods of public transportation used by what feels like everyone (at the same time) in the city of Istanbul. A seat on the bus, metro, or tram is a highly coveted spot that is not easily attained. In fact, sometimes just getting on any of these vehicles is a nearly impossible feat because they are so crowded. “Maximum Capacity” doesn’t seem to be a concept as firmly held here as it is in the U.S.

Departments:
Blog Author:
Sean Novak and India Pierce

 

Collaboration & Change for a Common Good
A Reflection on Collaboration in Campus Life
India Pierce and Sean Novak

 

One way that we can work effectively to create change for a common good is to work collaboratively across communities. With this in mind, India Pierce from the Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity (CSGD) came together with Sean Novak from the Center for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) to create a program that explored the intersections of race and sexual orientation. As part of the CMA’s En/Countering Racism series (E/C), they created a program for students to gather and explore intersectionality. This was done in order to deepen participants’ understanding of themselves and others as a means to building stronger coalitions for social justice.

Blog Author:
Sheila Broderick, LCSW

Will you help me? Today, I am on my “Relationship Soapbox.”  I invite you to get mad with me and spread the word.  First, I supply context.  Something like 18 times a week, I hear some version of this from friends, neighbors, family and students:

“Me and this guy, this girl, this friend (insert whatever nomenclature fits here) are “hooking up” but we are not in a relationship.”  Let’s suspend my irritation with the laziness of the “hooking up” verbage.   I will save that rant for another blog.  For today, I will focus on the silliness of the notion of sexual intimacy without a relationship.

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For this blog post, some of the interns at the Women’s Center decided to share our personal history with feminism. We have all had different experiences and there isn’t a singular theme among our stories, but we hope that our experiences encourage others in the Duke community to explore what feminism means to them.

 

From Colleen O’Connor (Community Building and Organizing Intern): `

 

Blog Author:
Women's Center Student Staff
(Written by Women's Center Student Staff) The Women's Center has always had a welcome back party, but there was something special about the one this year. It was the first time that the student staff (all of the interns and PACT trainers) came together and independently planned the party, it was the Women's Center's first big event of the year, but really we think it was the number of students, faculty, and other Duke community members that came to the party that made it so special. In years past, there have always been individuals who were strongly associated with the Center who came to the party. This year we had a record number of first-year students and other new faces come and share. It really showed us how the Women's Center has grown, and the party set a great tone for year to come. We planned for this event at the Women's Center retreat!
Blog Author:
Sheila Broderick, LCSW

It really is true what they say about being a parent.  One day their little chubby hand in yours crossing the street, telling you they want to live with you forever.  And the next, packing up and going to college.  I used to think of this as such a desperately sad thing.  But I have come to understand that these are the thin places, where the sacred meets the profane.  And you don’t get one without the other.

I walk around campus now and it is teeming with beautiful faces.  And while so often we wish for the quiet of the summer, I have to admit; it’s good to see everyone again.  Once again, I am part of a tribe, a thin place.

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Blog Author:
The SHAC

Among the top 3 sex questions I get asked is “does it get better?” I take it from this that a lot of us are having at best pretty disappointing first sexual experiences and at worst painful and confusing. 

So, let’s start with the first, disappointing. I will save the suspension and go ahead and answer a resounding yes! Or, perhaps I should say “Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes!”

The first time I rode a horse (okay, all right, I know, I know, skip the joking) but seriously, it’s an apt and personal memory.  The first time I rode a horse I was terrified.  2000 pounds of energy and muscles and I was supposed to know how to stay on, how not to get hurt, much less figure out how to enjoy the experience.  I am a “set your expectations low” kind of lass and I remember being grateful that nothing had broken – on me or him.  No one got hurt.

Just like sex.

Blog Author:
Sheila Broderick, LCSW

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Once parents find out that I specialize in treating the effects of sexual assault, if they have girls, they often ask me what they should say to their daughter to keep her safe.

 

First, I will say actually you should be talking to the men and boys in your life about the daily realities of violence toward women because we will never make any progress until 50% of the population stops absorbing this problem as a way of protecting the feelings of the men in their lives.

 

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