Blog

Blog Author:
Brian Njoroge

“If you do not take random naps, you are not living life” - despondent pre-med student after coming from a chemistry lab.

As finals season approaches, most of us find ourselves running low on sleep. CAPS recommends 6-8 hours of sleep to maximize productivity. Although napping daily isn’t advised (sad, right?), such times call for dire measures- in this case should suffice. No one wants to take the bus back to East or Central Campus or walk down the countless steps to your room in Edens (you might as well just go to Wilson if you needed to work out) just to take a nap.  I asked a couple of students- whose napping habits are questionable- for the perfect napping spots around the Campus Center. 

This list is in no preferential order.

Blog Author:
Cyan DeVeaux

Hey everyone!

My name is Cyan and I am currently a freshman here at Duke. I’m from New York so I’m a bit far from home, but my experiences at Duke make it worth the travel. What I really love about my school, and part of my decision to come here, had to do with all of the opportunities that are offered. I came here telling myself to take advantage of the resources that I have while I can.

Read more.

Blog Author:
A community response

Jack D explains what happened:

As many of you know, early in the morning yesterday someone entered my dorm and sprawled on the wall of the first floor, “Death to all fags @ Jack.” In just five words and an ‘at’ symbol, my sense of security and safety on this campus was shattered. 

Efforts have been made to find the assailant but the likelihood of success seems minimal. However, the person who wrote on the wall is greatly unimportant.

I would like for people to understand who I am. I wish to be a peer and not a name. I grew up near Boston with a single mother and siblings. I played sports throughout school and spent summers volunteering. I am a freshman but have lived as a proudly out and visible gay man on Duke’s campus. I am Jack. I am the fag. I do not deserve this treatment. No one deserves this treatment.

It's already November! That means the fall semester is almost over and you may be asking yourself how you missed August, September, and October. Don't worry, it's easy for the semester to fly by so fast; especially with all of the opportunities on campus. To provide you with a quick recap UCAE Student Involvement has compiled a few infographics of semester highlights. Hopefully this fills you with some nostalgia for the past semester and encourages you to seek out new opportunities in the spring. 

Blog Author:
​Jordan Hale and Simon Partner, Co-Chairs, Duke Summer Reading Committee

Nominations are now being accepted for the Class of 2019 Duke Common Experience. As a piece of the coming changes to Orientation this summer, we have decided to enhance our Summer Reading program. While we will still have a book the incoming class will read, there will be a variety of programs connected to the book both during the summer and over the course of the fall semester. These will include:

  • ​Virtual content sharing of key themes and ideas over the summer months
  • Connection with Alumni Affairs in reading the selection
  • Speakers and programs during the year connected to the selection
  • One over-arching theme that connects the selection to programs here at Duke during the year

However, the biggest change is the format for hosting the author and discussion about the book and what we seek to do over the summer.

Blog Author:
Sean Novak and India Pierce

 

Collaboration & Change for a Common Good
A Reflection on Collaboration in Campus Life
India Pierce and Sean Novak

 

One way that we can work effectively to create change for a common good is to work collaboratively across communities. With this in mind, India Pierce from the Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity (CSGD) came together with Sean Novak from the Center for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) to create a program that explored the intersections of race and sexual orientation. As part of the CMA’s En/Countering Racism series (E/C), they created a program for students to gather and explore intersectionality. This was done in order to deepen participants’ understanding of themselves and others as a means to building stronger coalitions for social justice.

Lauren King, Panhellenic Association Director of Public Relations
Emily O’Loane, Panhellenic Association Director of Administration & Order

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

When you ask the average Duke student what they want to do during their free time on a Friday morning, you can bet your bottom dollar that Party-Monitor training is not on the list. I am no exception. So when my SLG mandated that all sophomores head over to the Wellness Center to get said training, I huffed and puffed and went over. I’m embarrassed to say that I didn’t think there would be much value in the experience. I thought they would be telling me lots of things I already knew, that it might be patronizing, and worst of all: a total waste of time.

I was wrong.

For this blog post, some of the interns at the Women’s Center decided to share our personal history with feminism. We have all had different experiences and there isn’t a singular theme among our stories, but we hope that our experiences encourage others in the Duke community to explore what feminism means to them.

 

From Colleen O’Connor (Community Building and Organizing Intern): `