Blog

Blog Author:
Lizzy Huang

When I first received my health insurance card, I was so confused about the numbers and the terms on the back of the card. How much am I going to pay if I am seeing a doctor?

Blog Author:
Jake Schapiro, Peer For You Peer Responder

In high school, I was team captain of the volleyball team. We had practice, games and weight training most of the time and it was easy to stay in shape. I would go home and my parents would cook a healthy dinner while I "wrote my essays", "researched" and "did my labs" (or Facebook messaged my friends about someone's new status, which in fairness sometimes seemed like an essay due to extensive stalking). I would have dinner with my family, which, since my sister is a vegetarian, usually consisted of steamed vegetables and fresh tofu and like good California hippies there was usually quinoa or some other strange grain my Tennessee roommate has never heard of.

Blog Author:
Jake Schapiro, Peer For You Peer Responder

Peer For You is now welcoming applications for Peer Responders to serve Duke students for next year.

Applications due March 16. Apply now.

We are a student-run resource that provides the space for undergraduate students to reach out for support and referrals in times of struggle. Any Duke student can send an anonymous message to one of our Peer Responders about a struggle or challenge that they are currently facing. The approached Peer Responder will respond to the message within 24 hours.

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

When you ask the average Duke student what they want to do during their free time on a Friday morning, you can bet your bottom dollar that Party-Monitor training is not on the list. I am no exception. So when my SLG mandated that all sophomores head over to the Wellness Center to get said training, I huffed and puffed and went over. I’m embarrassed to say that I didn’t think there would be much value in the experience. I thought they would be telling me lots of things I already knew, that it might be patronizing, and worst of all: a total waste of time.

I was wrong.

Blog Author:
Casey Tissue, '16

I first realized something was wrong last spring after I walked from the West bus stop all the way back to East crying.  It had been a long day, and after my 1:25 class, I just wanted to go back to Bell Tower and relax.  However, as many Duke students know, leaving the West bus stop at 2:40 is similar to Black Friday shopping – except that the final destination is usually a lecture rather than a new T.V.  Not feeling aggressive that day, I was one of the last to step onto the bus.  Given that there were so many people waiting, I figured the driver would understand the fullness of the bus, but he made me get off to wait for the next one.

Blog Author:
The SHAC

Among the top 3 sex questions I get asked is “does it get better?” I take it from this that a lot of us are having at best pretty disappointing first sexual experiences and at worst painful and confusing. 

So, let’s start with the first, disappointing. I will save the suspension and go ahead and answer a resounding yes! Or, perhaps I should say “Yes! Yes! Yes! Yes!”

The first time I rode a horse (okay, all right, I know, I know, skip the joking) but seriously, it’s an apt and personal memory.  The first time I rode a horse I was terrified.  2000 pounds of energy and muscles and I was supposed to know how to stay on, how not to get hurt, much less figure out how to enjoy the experience.  I am a “set your expectations low” kind of lass and I remember being grateful that nothing had broken – on me or him.  No one got hurt.

Just like sex.

“You can’t hate someone whose story you know,” wrote a Duke sophomore woman writing of her experience with being exposed to recent immigrants during an Alternative Fall Break experience she had last semester.  What she meant was that what she learned about these families who originated in countries other than the USA was that once you know their stories, you connect and you can longer live in the comfort of ignorance.

There are those who talk and there are those who do.  WHO (Women's Housing Option) does.  This living group has set themself apart as more than just a place for women to live.  Concepts like "safe space", "social advocacy" and "community efficacy" come to mind when looking at the stirring and dynamic new campaign that was launched last week.  Body image issues are a reality in many of our lives.  The statistics that support this truth are alarming as words are spoken with little or no thought given to the lasting psychological impact that is left in the wake of commentaries on women's bodies.  It is encouraging to see that, with the photo expertise of Ashley Tsai, this group of women has created space to invite conversation, expand thought provoking images and develop the tools to initiate positive change.  All of our lives are affected when even one life is disrupted by the inability