Blog

Blog Author:
Brian Njoroge

“If you do not take random naps, you are not living life” - despondent pre-med student after coming from a chemistry lab.

As finals season approaches, most of us find ourselves running low on sleep. CAPS recommends 6-8 hours of sleep to maximize productivity. Although napping daily isn’t advised (sad, right?), such times call for dire measures- in this case should suffice. No one wants to take the bus back to East or Central Campus or walk down the countless steps to your room in Edens (you might as well just go to Wilson if you needed to work out) just to take a nap.  I asked a couple of students- whose napping habits are questionable- for the perfect napping spots around the Campus Center. 

This list is in no preferential order.

Blog Author:
Janine Weaver-Douglas

Central Campus’s theme for this year; our one-word call to action is: SOLIDARITY. The concept of standing together in opposition to threats to the well-being and progress of our collective community. My hope, and this is where you come in, is that we as a campus can promote solidarity, in it's multidimensional nature, to the larger Duke and Durham community, and most importantly, to each other. 

Blog Author:
Larry Moneta, Vice President for Student Affairs

Dear Duke Families,

As I look out my office window, I have the privilege of seeing our students walking (and rushing) by between classes, meals, meetings and study venues. So many things are apparent on the rare occasion that I get to just pause and admire the passersby. I notice that many seem either immune to the winter chill or in denial about the need to wear warmer clothes! I notice that rarely is anyone walking alone. Students travel in pairs, groups and masses! I notice that some kind of technological device is apparently welded to their ears or their palms (hopefully talking or texting with you). But, I also notice how remarkably different they are, reflecting the substantial and wonderful diversity within the Duke student body.

Blog Author:
A community response

Jack D explains what happened:

As many of you know, early in the morning yesterday someone entered my dorm and sprawled on the wall of the first floor, “Death to all fags @ Jack.” In just five words and an ‘at’ symbol, my sense of security and safety on this campus was shattered. 

Efforts have been made to find the assailant but the likelihood of success seems minimal. However, the person who wrote on the wall is greatly unimportant.

I would like for people to understand who I am. I wish to be a peer and not a name. I grew up near Boston with a single mother and siblings. I played sports throughout school and spent summers volunteering. I am a freshman but have lived as a proudly out and visible gay man on Duke’s campus. I am Jack. I am the fag. I do not deserve this treatment. No one deserves this treatment.

Blog Author:
Chris Heltne, Student Affairs

Rabbi Elana Friedman began her work as Campus Rabbi for Jewish Life at Duke earlier this year. She can be reached at the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, 919-684-3138, or elana.friedman@duke.edu.

Blog Author:
Kimberly McCrae, Program Coordinator, Duke Women’s Center

Maya Angelou entered my life at a time when I very much needed to see someone who looked like me, both in body and in spirit, doing and being something unconventional. I remember reading I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and hanging onto every word. I was in my first semester of college, at Pace University in New York, and dealing with a particularly trying and debilitating trauma that had recently occurred in my life. A dear friend had recommended this text to me. I didn’t know then that it would serve to reconnect me to pieces of myself that had been silenced/I had silenced. 

Blog Author:
Lizz Yeh, '12

It is a special cohort of students that is able to claim itself as Literature majors at Duke University, and I consider myself extremely lucky to call myself one of that small group of ten that graduated from the department just two years ago. However, I must warn you - though I am proud to call it mine now, it wasn't always so.

Blog Author:
Stephanie Helms-Pickett, Director, Duke Women’s Center

When asked to submit reflections on leadership, I immediately desired to have the reflection correlate with the topical focus of ethos and leadership.

Audience: