Blog

“You can’t hate someone whose story you know,” wrote a Duke sophomore woman writing of her experience with being exposed to recent immigrants during an Alternative Fall Break experience she had last semester.  What she meant was that what she learned about these families who originated in countries other than the USA was that once you know their stories, you connect and you can longer live in the comfort of ignorance.

There are those who talk and there are those who do.  WHO (Women's Housing Option) does.  This living group has set themself apart as more than just a place for women to live.  Concepts like "safe space", "social advocacy" and "community efficacy" come to mind when looking at the stirring and dynamic new campaign that was launched last week.  Body image issues are a reality in many of our lives.  The statistics that support this truth are alarming as words are spoken with little or no thought given to the lasting psychological impact that is left in the wake of commentaries on women's bodies.  It is encouraging to see that, with the photo expertise of Ashley Tsai, this group of women has created space to invite conversation, expand thought provoking images and develop the tools to initiate positive change.  All of our lives are affected when even one life is disrupted by the inability

by Kaitlin Gladney

Thumbnail If you knew one in four of your peers suffered from some form of a particular illness—an illness that, when left untreated, can make everyday life an overwhelming challenge and even result in death—what would you do? How would you feel if people wrote this illness off as a sign of weakness or were uncomfortable discussing it?

by Li-Chen Chin

To the CMA community,

As the Bryan Center transformation began, all of us in the Center for Multicultural Affairs were excited about our area getting a face-lift, which will include an expansion of meeting space for student organizations. We anticipated that we might have to vacate the premises at some point for a short period of time. However, we were very surprised when recently we were told that the CMA staff had to vacate from December 2012 to April 2013. There were and continued to be many questions.  What are we going to do during this extended period of time? How will our work be affected next semester? Will the students who hang out, study, or seek refuge in our Center find another place to go?

One of last year's seniors (and a former DUWELL intern), Rose O'Connor, was inspired to write this blog in the spring of 2012, her last semester at Duke.  As we approach Thanksgiving time, it seems especially appropriate to consider gratitude and how to appreciate the small things in life...

This blog was written by Laura Neubauer ('13), and was based on an interview with Franca Alphin conducted  in the spring of 2012.

When you think of replenishment beverages after working out, what comes to mind? I tend to think of sports drinks such as Gatorade or Powerade, or those “mix it yourself” drinks such as Endurox. I was surprised to learn, though, that it is chocolate milk that provides your body exactly what it needs post-workout.

Many folks around the nation have embraced the “Eat Local” movement, in regard to meat, produce and dairy, but not much attention has been paid to fish. EAT LOCAL FISH DAY on Tuesday, 9/25 will introduce you to sustainable seafood.

Please join Duke Dining and Bon Appetit Management Company at the Marketplace on East Campus on Tuesday, 9/25 at lunchtime, for the Eat Local Fish Challenge. Helpful apps, recipes and extensive research will be available to all and sustainable fish populations will be highlighted.

Hello, and welcome to the DUWELL at Duke Blog! We’re excited to bring you posts created by staff and students at Duke.  This summer, we’ll post blogs once a week exploring different health and wellness related news, stories, information, videos, etc.  During the academic year, you’ll get even MORE great posts on these topics when we begin posting 2-3 times per week!

We believe that Wellness is an integration of many areas of life, including financial, social, intellectual, & spiritual well-being, self care, and the physical/social environment that surrounds us.  Each of these dimensions of wellness is essential in maintaining harmony and balance in our lives.