Blog

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

[Gearing up for the Career Fair]

9:35: I'm eating breakfast and reading The Chronicle. Kind of. Pancakes at Penn are really hitting the spot, and consequently distracting me. 

9:36: Headed to the Career Fair today. Job. Career. The Future. Watcha gonna do with your life, Elizabeth? Nerves? Nah, it's just the rest of my life starting right now, in a gym that smells like sneakers, at a table, with a stranger who can only be so excited to work yet another career fair... Piece of cake! 

9:37: Advice I read in The Chronicle from the Career Center: Know what you want to get out of the fair. Right. Obvious. Hi, I'd like an internship-that-becomes-full-time-job, please. Preferably highly paid that allows me to eat local and organic. Got one? Great. See you this summer.

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Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

It’s that time of the year again when we all start to hear the question… The one that if you’re like me and knee-deep in internship applications, can put your stomach in knots: “You have plans for the summer?”

Excuse me while I binge on Downton Abbey episodes and Trader Joe’s dried mango slices. I will do all the dishes, scoop up the dog poop, and stare down those creepy squirrels that jump out of the trash cans on West Campus. Just don’t remind me that I. Don’t. Know. Because let’s be honest, there are few things that Duke students like less than not being on top of things. And now, with lots of internships to find and emails to write, it’s not only “not on top,” it feels like I’m at flat bottom.

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By Tammy J. Samuels, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center

Talking about one’s failures is not an easy thing to do.  In fact, you would probably prefer to leave it out of almost any conversation.  When it comes to telling your story as a job seeker, showcasing your failure may not be all that bad. Now, does this mean you dump your failures into the conversation without purpose or meaning?  Absolutely not.  There’s a time and a place for everything and the interview is most likely the best place for it.  Typically, in the interview, you are likely to get the question about weaknesses, which would seem the most obvious place to insert failures however, what if you don’t get the question?  Do you still want to talk about failure?  I say yes!

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Blog Author:
Nadine Verna, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center

 

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I spent the previous week studying for finals and writing papers with limited sleep, but when I handed in my last assignment, I felt a mixture of relief and resignation. 

“Thank you,” the department secretary said, “You’re all set.” 
“That’s it?” I asked.
“That’s it!” She replied cheerfully.

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Has this thought rattled through your head? I might be interested in jobs in consulting or finance, I really haven’t thought about it yet.  I’ll just go through the process and figure it out as I go.  What do I have to lose? It's not an unusual one, and just like the upside is the chance that something might surprise you, there are downsides to spending a lot of time pursuing opportunities that you're not confident about. 

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