Blog

Blog Author:
Hanan Awel, '17

Thumbnail My parents told me that when I was a young toddler, I wanted to be a doctor, dancer, writer, flight attendant, singer, and actor all at once. I was constantly envisioning myself as a new person each time I came up with a new profession; I was always living in the future. I could never pinpoint what I wanted to do. Duke changed that.

As a new academic year begins, we all begin to set expectations and goals for ourself in the upcoming year. Whether a new or returning student, you've probably already started thinking about what this semester can hold. As you go forward, we in the Wellness Center encourage you to consider one question:

What's Your True Blue?

We all have times where we have to make choices.  "True Blue" can mean thinking about who you are and what you value, it can mean thinking about your Duke experience and what you want it to be, or it might just mean considering how you plan to stay true to your goals and authentic self as you navigate your college experience.  

Audience:

“You can’t hate someone whose story you know,” wrote a Duke sophomore woman writing of her experience with being exposed to recent immigrants during an Alternative Fall Break experience she had last semester.  What she meant was that what she learned about these families who originated in countries other than the USA was that once you know their stories, you connect and you can longer live in the comfort of ignorance.

There are those who talk and there are those who do.  WHO (Women's Housing Option) does.  This living group has set themself apart as more than just a place for women to live.  Concepts like "safe space", "social advocacy" and "community efficacy" come to mind when looking at the stirring and dynamic new campaign that was launched last week.  Body image issues are a reality in many of our lives.  The statistics that support this truth are alarming as words are spoken with little or no thought given to the lasting psychological impact that is left in the wake of commentaries on women's bodies.  It is encouraging to see that, with the photo expertise of Ashley Tsai, this group of women has created space to invite conversation, expand thought provoking images and develop the tools to initiate positive change.  All of our lives are affected when even one life is disrupted by the inability

Submitted by Monika Jingchen Hu

Back in my home country China, seeking help from a professional counselor seems to admit that you are sick and/or mad. The standard way of coping with it is that if you have problems (usually they are considered as things having a short term effect; i.e. they are not supposed to be illness), you should go talk to your family or friends, and naturally as time goes by you will be fine. Hence professional counseling in China is such an undeveloped industry – little supply, and therefore little demand, and the circle goes on.