Blog

Blog Author:
DAA

One of the most enduring benefits of a Duke education is the opportunity to network with successful alumni around the world. Connecting with alumni can help students enhance their studies, explore career options, make new contacts and identify potential jobs and internships.

Now, the Duke Alumni Association is making it far easier for students to tap into that network. This fall, DAA created a student portal into its redesigned alumni directory, for the first time giving students the ability to search for and contact more than 100,000 alumni. Students can access the directory through DAA’s website (alumni.duke.edu), where they can search for alumni in specific industries or locations. Students use their NetIDs to sign in to the directory; there is no additional registration necessary.

Writing to parents about the career and professional development process is always a challenging thing to attempt—mostly because on almost every topic the conversation is very different depending on the student and his/her academic class year. In a newsletter like this one, 500 words go quickly!  There is however, one issue that students bring to us from parents, regardless of the academic progress of their daughter or son—career security. So let’s look at that issue today.

Departments:

First-year undergraduates are often faced with a double-bind: the need for professional experience in order to gain professional experience.  Compounding this challenge is the fact that when vying for summer internships, first-years find themselves in competition with more experienced sophomores and juniors.

Recognizing this unique situation, the Career Center established First-Year Internships at Duke, a competitive program that matches first-year students with project-based internships throughout the University and Medical Center.

A Letter from Bill Wright-Swadel, Fannie Mitchell Executive Director of the Career Center

A liberal arts buffet is an educational meal of choice, depth, range, and integration - a mix of academics, experience, and reflection. However, a plate too full is a bad casserole, not a sumptuous feast.

During the fall semester I shared a tweet that was an appropriately cryptic version of the above statement on the Student Affairs/Career Center website. It was in many ways a summation of the conversation the career staff has with students all the time. “How can they take advantage of the wonderful opportunity that is Duke, while not becoming so immersed in the possibilities that the experience becomes a chaotic mix of too much, done not well enough?”