Blog

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

Midterms are alive and well. As students, we’ve all realized that the hard way, unfortunately. In an act of solidarity, I’m gonna share some wisdom from Jean Hanson and Jo Supernaw at the Wellness center. With these myths busted you’ll, in my opinion, be able to kick midterm’s a** better. (Hint: It involves more sleep.)

Myth #1: The effects of my all-nighter only impacts me.

You may be the only one who gets to sport the Dukie-meets-phantom-menace look, but your worsened mood? Lack of focus? Degree of inefficiency?  You can’t be as productive a teammate, as present a friend, nor as pleasant an acquaintance.

All-nighters don’t make you cool or more impressive. They make you tired. 

Myth #2: Staying up those extra few hours to cram will help my GPA.

Blog Author:
Isabella Kwai, '16

Let me be entirely honest and open in what I’m about to say. Honesty after all, is so little found in conversations about mental health and yet so powerful when it is. I have, like 1 in 4 other young people my age, struggled with my mental health on and off. There have been times when I’ve been sick with hopelessness and misery, consumed with self-loathing and hatred. Likewise, there have times when I’ve been ecstatically happy and grateful. My emotional health is a mental rollercoaster and contains the best and worst memories for me. But it is not all of me.

Blog Author:
Jake Schapiro, Peer For You Peer Responder

Peer For You is now welcoming applications for Peer Responders to serve Duke students for next year.

Applications due March 16. Apply now.

We are a student-run resource that provides the space for undergraduate students to reach out for support and referrals in times of struggle. Any Duke student can send an anonymous message to one of our Peer Responders about a struggle or challenge that they are currently facing. The approached Peer Responder will respond to the message within 24 hours.

Blog Author:
Chris Heltne, Director of Communications for Student Affairs

Duke Student Health will pilot a consolidation of their clinical services by closing the East Campus Clinic for Spring Semester, 2014.

"There is a combination of reasons for our decision to close the East Campus Clinic," said Dr. John Vaughn, director of Student Health at Duke, "but first and foremost is that we feel doing so will better allow us to deliver the standard of medical care that students deserve and the Duke University Health System demands."

The East Campus Health Clinic was established in the 1990s.  According to Jean Hanson, RN, MPH, administrative director for clinical support services and outreach, it was initially staffed by a nurse only and was intended to handle “simple” cases for the freshman campus. 

Blog Author:
Casey Tissue, '16

Gratitude can change your attitude.  Being thankful helps us to feel happy, according to Deborah Norville, a broadcast journalist, author, news anchor, and parent of two Duke students. Over family weekend, she gave a lecture on her experiences balancing work and life, and shared stories of how gratitude towards others has had a positive impact on herself and others.

So why is it so hard for us to be thankful if it makes us feel good? Don’t we want to have that warm, fuzzy feeling of knowing we told someone how much we appreciate them?

Blog Author:
Casey Tissue, '16

I first realized something was wrong last spring after I walked from the West bus stop all the way back to East crying.  It had been a long day, and after my 1:25 class, I just wanted to go back to Bell Tower and relax.  However, as many Duke students know, leaving the West bus stop at 2:40 is similar to Black Friday shopping – except that the final destination is usually a lecture rather than a new T.V.  Not feeling aggressive that day, I was one of the last to step onto the bus.  Given that there were so many people waiting, I figured the driver would understand the fullness of the bus, but he made me get off to wait for the next one.

"Keeping It Real"
Hailing from the streets of Compton, California, I realized early in life that I did not fit the preconceived, stereotypical image of the kid from the so-called “ghetto”.  Although I was surrounded by a world of drugs and violence, I was not going to try to become something I was not. I would not let those disparities phase me…ever. I went with my own flow.

My name is Pablo Santander and I’m a member of this year’s True Blue cast. I’m a rising junior from New York City, majoring in Chemistry and minoring in Biology. This summer, I took a couple of summer session classes, and have recently been shadowing at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Freshman year is a time for growth, learning and having fun. I had no idea what to expect when I arrived two years ago, and wish I had done some things differently looking back. Many members of the True Blue cast have similar thoughts, and by sharing our experiences with all of you, we wish to help you guys have the best possible transition to college life. Welcome Class of 2017!

Blog Author:
Tianyu Shi

Hello class of 2017! My name is Tianyu and I’m a rising senior majoring in biomedical engineering and computer science. I’m currently a software engineering intern at LinkedIn and I plan to go into the software and tech industry after I graduate.

Weeklong Events:
Facts on the Quad, Featured Books in Perkins, Daily Tweets, & Photo Exhibit in the BC (Mon-Sun). Other events listed below.

Monday