Blog

Passover 2017

Seder
Jewish Life at Duke strives to make Passover at Duke a special time by providing multiple options for Seders. Students are more than welcome to attend a traditional, communal seder at the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, or they may elect to attend one of the many student hosted Seders held across campus. Students are kindly asked to register for all Passover celebrations.

Passover celebrations at the Freeman Center:
1st Seder: Monday, April 10th at 7:15pm
2nd Seder: Tuesday, April 11th at 8:15pm
Matzah Brie Brunch: Thursday, April 13th from 5:00 – 8:00pm
Passover Shabbat: Friday, April 14th at 7:00pm

Departments:
Blog Author:
Jewish Life at Duke

Campus Rabbi Elana Friedman offers some thoughts as we enter into the New Year and celebrate the High Holidays on campus

Departments:
Blog Author:
Larry Moneta, Vice President for Student Affairs

Dear Duke Families,

As I look out my office window, I have the privilege of seeing our students walking (and rushing) by between classes, meals, meetings and study venues. So many things are apparent on the rare occasion that I get to just pause and admire the passersby. I notice that many seem either immune to the winter chill or in denial about the need to wear warmer clothes! I notice that rarely is anyone walking alone. Students travel in pairs, groups and masses! I notice that some kind of technological device is apparently welded to their ears or their palms (hopefully talking or texting with you). But, I also notice how remarkably different they are, reflecting the substantial and wonderful diversity within the Duke student body.

Blog Author:
Chris Heltne, Student Affairs

Rabbi Elana Friedman began her work as Campus Rabbi for Jewish Life at Duke earlier this year. She can be reached at the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, 919-684-3138, or elana.friedman@duke.edu.

Blog Author:
Christy Lohr Sapp, Associate Dean for Religious Life, Duke Chapel

A friar, an imam and a rabbi walk into a lounge … This might sound like the start of a joke, but actually, it’s the start of an interfaith gathering on campus. The Duke Chapel Lounge is not a 70s-era bar with dim lighting, fruity drinks and mood music, but it is a place where connections are made and interfaith interaction happens on a regular basis.