Blog

Blog Author:
Jake Schapiro, Peer For You Peer Responder

Peer For You is now welcoming applications for Peer Responders to serve Duke students for next year.

Applications due March 16. Apply now.

We are a student-run resource that provides the space for undergraduate students to reach out for support and referrals in times of struggle. Any Duke student can send an anonymous message to one of our Peer Responders about a struggle or challenge that they are currently facing. The approached Peer Responder will respond to the message within 24 hours.

Blog Author:
Isabella Kwai, '16

I have 1971 Facebook friends. I know that sounds like a lot but I’m fairly Facebook aggressive. And we all know it’s not official unless it’s Facebook official.

Over a thousand of these friends are from the last year at Duke alone. Some of them are from a single good conversation while waiting in the Pitchforks line. Others are familiar faces that have seen all forty-five of my go-to dance moves. There are dorm mates I’ve shared both meals and memories with, upperclassmen I admire hugely and kids that I don’t know well at all, but secretly stalk because they have seriously cool profile pictures.

But how many friends do I actually talk to on a regular basis in real life?

Probably around four.

Thumbnail John Vaughn has been named the new Director of Student Health for Duke University. Dr. Vaughn will begin his new role July 1.

Submitted by Deja Beamon

I remember the first time I was sick and alone. I was in middle school and my mom had just been hired for a new job in the city. Of course on her first day I woke up with a raging stomach virus (hey, viruses can rage too!). She had to go to her first day so I was left to my own devices at home. Let’s say it was a messy situation but I did know two things at the tender age of somewhere between 10-13:

Contrary to popular thought, stress is designed to help, an alarm that goes off when there is a threat, much like an alarm system in a house. In that sense, stress is not a bad thing. Stress is the body's and mind's response to challenging situations.

The problem arises with our reactions to stress. The skill is to recognize the things that are going to cause stress, and to deactivating the false alarms. Duke provides a number of resources to help students identify the causes of the alarm and physiological manifestations of stress, to take positive steps toward using this understanding, and to add tools for today and a lifetime that will help students turn stress to their benefit.

Dear students,

As we approach the end of this academic year, I write with a few updates, some encouragement and considerable well wishes. It’s hard to believe that this academic year is nearly over and I know that those of you who are graduating are finding hard to believe that your undergraduate years are nearly complete. Having graduated myself in 1972, I can barely believe that I'll be celebrating my 40th year in Student Affairs! Every year has been special and fulfilling and this past year I've enjoyed many, many opportunities to be of support to all of you.