Blog

Blog Author:
Sean Novak and India Pierce

 

Collaboration & Change for a Common Good
A Reflection on Collaboration in Campus Life
India Pierce and Sean Novak

 

One way that we can work effectively to create change for a common good is to work collaboratively across communities. With this in mind, India Pierce from the Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity (CSGD) came together with Sean Novak from the Center for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) to create a program that explored the intersections of race and sexual orientation. As part of the CMA’s En/Countering Racism series (E/C), they created a program for students to gather and explore intersectionality. This was done in order to deepen participants’ understanding of themselves and others as a means to building stronger coalitions for social justice.

For this blog post, some of the interns at the Women’s Center decided to share our personal history with feminism. We have all had different experiences and there isn’t a singular theme among our stories, but we hope that our experiences encourage others in the Duke community to explore what feminism means to them.

 

From Colleen O’Connor (Community Building and Organizing Intern): `

 

Blog Author:
Women's Center Student Staff
(Written by Women's Center Student Staff) The Women's Center has always had a welcome back party, but there was something special about the one this year. It was the first time that the student staff (all of the interns and PACT trainers) came together and independently planned the party, it was the Women's Center's first big event of the year, but really we think it was the number of students, faculty, and other Duke community members that came to the party that made it so special. In years past, there have always been individuals who were strongly associated with the Center who came to the party. This year we had a record number of first-year students and other new faces come and share. It really showed us how the Women's Center has grown, and the party set a great tone for year to come. We planned for this event at the Women's Center retreat!

Seated in groups of three or four, about 10 Duke community members held sheets in front of them as they phonetically recited words from the pages.

"Nin hao! Jin tian nin yao zhao shen me yi fu ya?" said SangHee Jeong, program coordinator with the International House who is from South Korea and is working to improve her Chinese conversational skills. She was asking a student partner, "Hello! What clothes are you looking for today?"

"wo jiu sui bian kan kan," the student partner replied. "I'll have a look."

“You can’t hate someone whose story you know,” wrote a Duke sophomore woman writing of her experience with being exposed to recent immigrants during an Alternative Fall Break experience she had last semester.  What she meant was that what she learned about these families who originated in countries other than the USA was that once you know their stories, you connect and you can longer live in the comfort of ignorance.

by Sean H. Palmer

It is on the eve of the 50th anniversary of Black Student Life that we pause to think about the principal of Ujima in our annual Kwanzaa Celebration. Since restarting this tradition in 2010, Duke’s Kwanzaa celebration has sought to lift up one principal each year in the hopes of honoring each principal in a seven-year cycle.

There are those who talk and there are those who do.  WHO (Women's Housing Option) does.  This living group has set themself apart as more than just a place for women to live.  Concepts like "safe space", "social advocacy" and "community efficacy" come to mind when looking at the stirring and dynamic new campaign that was launched last week.  Body image issues are a reality in many of our lives.  The statistics that support this truth are alarming as words are spoken with little or no thought given to the lasting psychological impact that is left in the wake of commentaries on women's bodies.  It is encouraging to see that, with the photo expertise of Ashley Tsai, this group of women has created space to invite conversation, expand thought provoking images and develop the tools to initiate positive change.  All of our lives are affected when even one life is disrupted by the inability

by Li-Chen Chin

To the CMA community,

As the Bryan Center transformation began, all of us in the Center for Multicultural Affairs were excited about our area getting a face-lift, which will include an expansion of meeting space for student organizations. We anticipated that we might have to vacate the premises at some point for a short period of time. However, we were very surprised when recently we were told that the CMA staff had to vacate from December 2012 to April 2013. There were and continued to be many questions.  What are we going to do during this extended period of time? How will our work be affected next semester? Will the students who hang out, study, or seek refuge in our Center find another place to go?

by Monika Jingchen Hu

I have been reading a classic Japanese manga – Slam Dunk (story of senior high school guys with basketball), and watching its animation adaptations for the past couple of weeks. The first time that I watched the animations was in 1998, 14 years ago, when I was in fourth grade. At that time, I had high expectations of my senior high school years, which would be in 6 years, hoping it to be full of youthful events, just like what all those characters in Slam Dunk, who had lived their lives to their fullest by playing basketball for fun and achievement.

Departments:

Dear Students,

We are excited about the upcoming renovations to the Bryan Center. While the work is being done, the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life will be moving to 2022 Campus Drive (formerly the International House) on Monday, November 19th and officially be open for business on Tuesday, November 20th.

In order to prepare for the move the Office will be closed on Friday, November 16th.

We look forward to many visitors in our temporary location and most importantly look forward to moving in to our new home on the lower level of the Bryan Center next to CMA.

Clarybel Peguero
Director, Fraternity & Sorority Life