Blog

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Jewish Life at Duke
From funny, personal stories of his mother’s reaction to his research awards – “that’s very nice, Bobby, but it’s not the Nobel” – to wise advice about mentorship and persistence, Dr. Robert Lefkowitz delighted over 200 viewers who tuned in to his virtual interview at Jewish Life at Duke with former Blue Devil David M. Rubenstein ’70 earlier this week. The conversation, introduced by Emma Mehlhop ‘21, a Jewish senior studying Economics and Global Health, was an entertaining and insightful peek inside the life and work of the cardiologist turned legendary scientist whom the Swedish press corps dubbed “the happiest Laureate.” Lefkowitz shared stories of his career path, family and personal life, and how his Jewish values shaped his life.
Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

The wait begins.

Yesterday I found out that I had become victim of government beaurocracy and needed to go to DC to arrange a passport emergency.  Last minute trip = little financial flexibility. Megabus it is. Gulp.

I get to the bus stop. Trepidation. I see several tired looking people in line in front of me. One woman holds a cigarette between her hands, getting the last hit before the 6-feels-like-60 hour-long journey begins. (I can’t blame her. I find myself trying to soak up all the fresh air I can.) Another man holds a plastic bag for his travel belongings. Everyone looks so tired, just like at Duke.

Hour 1
I get seated on the Megabus. Why is it that they seem to smell like a mixture between floral soap, cigarettes, and baby powder?

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

[Gearing up for the Career Fair]

9:35: I'm eating breakfast and reading The Chronicle. Kind of. Pancakes at Penn are really hitting the spot, and consequently distracting me. 

9:36: Headed to the Career Fair today. Job. Career. The Future. Watcha gonna do with your life, Elizabeth? Nerves? Nah, it's just the rest of my life starting right now, in a gym that smells like sneakers, at a table, with a stranger who can only be so excited to work yet another career fair... Piece of cake! 

9:37: Advice I read in The Chronicle from the Career Center: Know what you want to get out of the fair. Right. Obvious. Hi, I'd like an internship-that-becomes-full-time-job, please. Preferably highly paid that allows me to eat local and organic. Got one? Great. See you this summer.

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Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

It’s that time of the year again when we all start to hear the question… The one that if you’re like me and knee-deep in internship applications, can put your stomach in knots: “You have plans for the summer?”

Excuse me while I binge on Downton Abbey episodes and Trader Joe’s dried mango slices. I will do all the dishes, scoop up the dog poop, and stare down those creepy squirrels that jump out of the trash cans on West Campus. Just don’t remind me that I. Don’t. Know. Because let’s be honest, there are few things that Duke students like less than not being on top of things. And now, with lots of internships to find and emails to write, it’s not only “not on top,” it feels like I’m at flat bottom.

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By Tammy J. Samuels, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center

Talking about one’s failures is not an easy thing to do.  In fact, you would probably prefer to leave it out of almost any conversation.  When it comes to telling your story as a job seeker, showcasing your failure may not be all that bad. Now, does this mean you dump your failures into the conversation without purpose or meaning?  Absolutely not.  There’s a time and a place for everything and the interview is most likely the best place for it.  Typically, in the interview, you are likely to get the question about weaknesses, which would seem the most obvious place to insert failures however, what if you don’t get the question?  Do you still want to talk about failure?  I say yes!

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Blog Author:
Nadine Verna, Assistant Director, Duke University Career Center

 

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I spent the previous week studying for finals and writing papers with limited sleep, but when I handed in my last assignment, I felt a mixture of relief and resignation. 

“Thank you,” the department secretary said, “You’re all set.” 
“That’s it?” I asked.
“That’s it!” She replied cheerfully.

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Blog Author:
Alex Shapanka

From the very moment we enter kindergarten our next thirteen or seventeen years are no longer up to us. Sure we can rebel, choose to drop out of school, or elect not to attend college. But we’re all at Duke, so I’m going to go out on limb and say we allowed our lives to be dictated by a cultural hegemony. Our immediate goal was decided for us – do well and move on to the next level of education. Of course we had opportunities to define our interests and seek complementary ventures, but the key word is complementary. With few exceptions we never chose to substitute our end game.

By Anna Koelsch, Write(H)ers participant

 

Does Facebook’s COO Sheryl Sandberg have the answer for how women can finally break the glass ceiling? Probably not. 

Sandberg has attracted a lot of attention in the past few years. She’s delivered TED Talks and a Barnard College commencement speech, and those speeches brim with facts describing the dire situation of female leadership. As she said at Barnard, “Of 190 heads of 2 state, nine are women.  Of all the parliaments around the world, 13% of those seats are held by women. Corporate America top jobs, 15% are women; numbers which have not moved at all in the past nine years.  Nine years.  Of full professors around the United States, only 24% are women.”

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By Write(H)ers participant Flora Muglia, T'14

When I imagine the glass ceiling, I envision a tall building with many stories. It is difficult to climb but has a view that is worth it in the end, and on the final floor the ceiling is a sunroof that tauntingly allows in beautiful rays of sunlight. People attempt to find a latter or set of stairs in order to get on the roof and actually see the sky from high up, some go as far as to push on it or try and find a weak spot, but alas there is no entry. All you can do is stare up and wish for a breath of fresh air.

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