Blog

I need feminism... Earlier this spring, Rachel Seidman's Women in the Public Sphere class had an idea--a viral idea.  These 16 students wanted to give the women's movement a PR boost to combat the post-feminist sentiments and "feminazi" backlash that they saw in the world. 

Submitted by Nicole Savage, Class of 2015

This morning, we woke up early, sad that it was the last day of our trip but excited to see what exciting adventures the day held in store for us. We took the bus to Moshav Netiv Ha'asarah, an area on Israel's border with the Gaza Strip. There, we heard Glenn Eilon speak about security in Israel and other interesting facts regarding the conflict with Gaza and the history of the area. She told us about the carrier pigeons, which were once used to send and receive important messages. She even let some of the students hold the pigeons and release them, and we all watched as they flew off to their next destination.

 

So, you've been told that you were sent a meeting request, but you never received it and the meeting creator has confirmed they sent it. What do you do now? 

The first step is to open Remote Desktop Connection. You may find it already in your dock, as shown in the image.

I

Or, you may navigate to it by doing the following:

·       Open Finder --> Applications --> Remote Desktop Connection

Once you have this application open, you will want to ensure you are connecting to

sa-ts-01.oit.duke.edu

Audience:

Submitted by Matt Lorch, University of Oklahoma Class 2013

Today started a little differently than the others. Waking up in the Bedouin tents, we were treated to a very minor sandstorm, one that impaired our vision slightly but really wasn't dangerous. It was a pretty cool experience to complete a night in the desert. After having breakfast at the camp, we boarded the bus and made the drive over to the Bedouin village of Lakiya. Lakiya was different than the rest of the Israeli towns we have visited. Buildings were in poorer shape and there was far more Arabic than Hebrew present in the town.

Submitted by Caitlin Plaut, Class of 2014

This was the day that we finally got to meet our soldiers!!  We started the day by eating more hummus and pita at breakfast in the
hotel.  Then we got on the bus to go meet our soldiers in Jaffa.  The anticipation was high, as everyone was so excited to add 7 new people
to our bus.  We arrived in Jaffa where our soldiers (clad in uniform) met up with our group.  After introductions, we all headed to the Jaffa Overlook.  The view was gorgeous!  The sea was bright blue, and the city of Tel Aviv rose in the background.

 

Beginning June 5th, users will see a new interface when they log into Duke esrvices using shibboleth. 

The new interface will not change how the log in process is completed, just how the page looks.

 

Ever been catcalled, felt up, ogled or otherwise harassed walking down the street, dancing at a club, riding on the subway or just minding your own business? Yeah, thought so--us too.  That's why we love Hollaback! Co-founder and Executive Director, Emily May, and people all over the world are shaking things up with a smart phone, a website and the power of their stories. By collecting, sharing and mapping stories, Hollaback is making a movement to end street harassment. Now they are planning to bring it to college campuses. Check them out, post a story, or support their campus campaign to join in the fight.  And, look forward to more updates about Hollaback.

Submitted by Zach Epstein, Class of 2013

We began the day driving through Mitzpeh Gadot, an abandoned Syrian outpost and learned about Israel’s miraculous victory in the 1967 Six Day War as well as the war’s aftermath.

Soon we arrived at Tzfat, a center of Jewish mysticism that today is full of synagogues, alleyways, and art stores. After the destruction of the second temple, many rabbis headed from Jerusalem north to Tzfat. Glancing at the deep expanse of hills pointing toward Jerusalem, one can see how the rabbis were inspired to develop a new understanding of the Torah. In Tzfat they wrote the Mishnah, which is a commentary of the Talmud, which is a commentary of the Torah.