Blog

Ever had those burning (no pun intended) questions about sex and relationships but were just too embarrassed to ask?! Well look no further!

The Sexual Health Advisory Committee (aka The SHAC) will be taking questions and responding to them via blog. 

Send your questions about sexual norms, sexual health, relationship advice, sex taboos, figuring out how to know what you like/what works for you, or anything.  Expect the unexpected, the truth and sometimes a good laugh.  We want to answer your questions and make sure you’re getting credible, honest, transparent information from professionals right here on campus.

Send your questions, concerns, comments, inquiries, suggestions, and master plans to greatsexpectations@studentaffairs.duke.edu and check out the blog to see what comes up!

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

You might think the signs of exhaustion are obvious, but sleep deprivation isn’t as obvious as you might think it is. Its effects creep up on us. Here are a few common manifestations of this sleep deprivation monster. 

You fidget a lot. And you don’t normally. 
You might think this is a reflection of your energy that just can’t be contained. But it can actually be a symptom of chronic sleep loss. Your body is going into to hyper-drive. Can’t stop moving might mean you need to stop. 

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

Midterms are alive and well. As students, we’ve all realized that the hard way, unfortunately. In an act of solidarity, I’m gonna share some wisdom from Jean Hanson and Jo Supernaw at the Wellness center. With these myths busted you’ll, in my opinion, be able to kick midterm’s a** better. (Hint: It involves more sleep.)

Myth #1: The effects of my all-nighter only impacts me.

You may be the only one who gets to sport the Dukie-meets-phantom-menace look, but your worsened mood? Lack of focus? Degree of inefficiency?  You can’t be as productive a teammate, as present a friend, nor as pleasant an acquaintance.

All-nighters don’t make you cool or more impressive. They make you tired. 

Myth #2: Staying up those extra few hours to cram will help my GPA.

Blog Author:
Cleoanne B. Estrera, RN, MSN, NP-C, Nurse Practitioner, Women's Health Coordinator, Duke Student Health

 

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Dear Birth Control Pill, Where a€™s My Period?!

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Blog Author:
Jo Supernaw, M.Ed., NCC, Duke Student Wellness Center

Day in and day out, we rely heavily on communication for making connections and reaching goals, but often we encounter struggle, instances of miscommunication, particularly during difficult conversations. Miscommunication happens for many reasons: 

  • Technology interferes with ability to show true emotion
  • Intent to be heard over listening
  • Intent to fix the discomfort/problem
  • Become defensive 
  • Keeping peace at your own expense through agreement or avoidance

...and the list goes on. We all recognize that difficult conversations are a part of living life, but even so that doesn't make them any easier to have. DUWELL asked students what they do in difficult conversations that has helped.  Here are some things they said:

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Contributed by a Duke Student and Former Nutrition Intern

Thumbnail Have you ever felt happy just from walking into a colorful day? The sky is blue, the trees are green, and the earth has red, purples, yellows, and browns. Well, today’s blog is about adding some color to your plate as well as your life.

Yes, I am talking about vegetables and fruits (hereafter referred to as “V & F.”)

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Blog Author:
Kate Sayre, MPH, RDN, LDN

Beginning next Monday, February 16th, Nutrition Services is partnering with many offices across campus to host a positive body image week.  In the past, we’ve celebrated National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, but found that students are already aware of eating disorders.  Renaming the week and focusing on learning to embrace our bodies can help students to move away from some of the behaviors that might increase risk of developing disordered eating and exercise patterns.

Here’s a breakdown of the events we have going on next week, all of which are free and do not require tickets.

Monday, February 16th:

Blog Author:
Isabella Kwai, '16

Let me be entirely honest and open in what I’m about to say. Honesty after all, is so little found in conversations about mental health and yet so powerful when it is. I have, like 1 in 4 other young people my age, struggled with my mental health on and off. There have been times when I’ve been sick with hopelessness and misery, consumed with self-loathing and hatred. Likewise, there have times when I’ve been ecstatically happy and grateful. My emotional health is a mental rollercoaster and contains the best and worst memories for me. But it is not all of me.

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

(Entry #3 in the series) Recently, I had the great pleasure of sitting down with Associate Director for Outreach and Development Programming for CAPS and all-around nice guy Gary Glass. The topic: relationships. Relationships in general, with no particular person in mind. It was the first time I'd discussed the topic at length, ever. My conclusion? We should do this more often. Here's #3!

Blog Author:
Elizabeth Hoyler, '16

Post #2 in the series. Recently, I had the great pleasure of sitting down with Associate Director for Outreach and Development Programming for CAPS and all-around nice guy Gary Glass. The topic: relationships. Relationships in general, with no particular person in mind. It was the first time I'd discussed the topic at length, ever. My conclusion? We should do this more often. I wrote one entry already. Read post #1.

One of the joys to living in a dorm with thin walls, as I did my freshman year, is that you could innocently eavesdrop on whatever conversation topics your neighbors chose to shout about. Yes, I mean shout. After all, inside voices are so pre-school.

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