Blog

Blog Author:
McCall Hollie, Duke Univ Women's Center Intern, Class of 2016

We had just wrapped up at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, drained from taking in all the incredible history exhibited in the museum’s three buildings. The consensus was to take the tram to a spot for lunch, then hop on it again to find a baklava shop we’d heard is amazing. The tram is one of several fantastic methods of public transportation used by what feels like everyone (at the same time) in the city of Istanbul. A seat on the bus, metro, or tram is a highly coveted spot that is not easily attained. In fact, sometimes just getting on any of these vehicles is a nearly impossible feat because they are so crowded. “Maximum Capacity” doesn’t seem to be a concept as firmly held here as it is in the U.S.

Departments:
Blog Author:
Sean Novak and India Pierce

 

Collaboration & Change for a Common Good
A Reflection on Collaboration in Campus Life
India Pierce and Sean Novak

 

One way that we can work effectively to create change for a common good is to work collaboratively across communities. With this in mind, India Pierce from the Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity (CSGD) came together with Sean Novak from the Center for Multicultural Affairs (CMA) to create a program that explored the intersections of race and sexual orientation. As part of the CMA’s En/Countering Racism series (E/C), they created a program for students to gather and explore intersectionality. This was done in order to deepen participants’ understanding of themselves and others as a means to building stronger coalitions for social justice.

For this blog post, some of the interns at the Women’s Center decided to share our personal history with feminism. We have all had different experiences and there isn’t a singular theme among our stories, but we hope that our experiences encourage others in the Duke community to explore what feminism means to them.

 

From Colleen O’Connor (Community Building and Organizing Intern): `

 

By Write(H)ers participant Adrienne Harreveld, T'15

 

With the Supreme Court hearings on issues of marriage equality, my entire Facebook newsfeed has become a sea of red equal signs, a notorious symbol of the Human Rights Campaign. One friend jokingly made the comment the influx of HRC red equal signs is like the Facebook version of passover. While it’s great to see so many of my Facebook friends are on the side of marriage equality, there are two things I find slightly troubling: 1) how quickly my  friends seem to buy into facebook or social media activism trends, otherwise known as “slacktivism” (think KONY 2012) and 2) The Human Rights Campaign itself.

My guess is if my friends knew more about some of the executive decisions made by the HRC, they would be less likely to promote its social media kitsch.

Departments:

My name is Kimberly McCrae and I recently transitioned to the Women's Center, as the Program Coordinator.  My beginning date was August 1, 2012 and things have been moving at a rapid pace ever since!  One of my first official engagements in this new chapter in my life was co-teaching a workshop with Sean Novak, a man of many talents, (Did you know he can rap?) for Project Change.  This small group of incoming Freshmen was somewhat omnipresent during their week-long experience in the program...they were EVERYWHERE!  They had a full week of immersion experiences, explicitly intended to prepare them for life here at Duke, in Durham and in the world at large.  I must say that these P-Changers were energetic, inquisitive, intelligent, bold, talkative and creative.  There are many ways to be a leader and this group held within it many great examples of leadership that I'm sure will emerge m

The students are always asking me what I do over the summer when they are not here on campus.  Indeed….what does the staff do when they are not around?  This summer, my Duke loves, I was introduced to impermanence and the power of steadfast resolve.

I was hiking and camping in Utah with friends.   For 5 days, Marty, more like a brother than colleague, would say “Sheila, all it takes is wind, water and time” when I would remark on the leveling of the mountains into oceans of sand.  These flat dessert sands interrupted by tall humanoid mountains reminded me of the power of patiently waiting.  All it took to create this unfamiliar Utah landscape was wind, water and time.