Career Center

S.E.E. More Opportunities

Editor: Monique Turrentine, M.S.

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Duke University Career Center, Employer Relations  

The S.E.E. More Opportunities content is for employers and Duke University students and staff. It is a resource that provides employers with information about various experiences and research shared by Duke students and other initiatives at Duke in the Information for Employers section. It serves to educate students about diverse employers and industries via the Information for Students section, and explores unique recruiting activities for student and employer engagement.

 

For Employers

Spring 2019 Issue

Undergraduate student: Art History major
Graduation: May 2020

Describe your current research and recent internship. After a semester in New York, I intend to pursue a research project and future thesis on the nuances of black female sexuality through self-portraiture. What I’ve learned most from the research is how to be a more thorough researcher.

What type of academic or career options are you interested in pursuing? Graduate school (Ph.D.); academia; museum work; or other opportunities that allow me to do research/writing/cultural critique.

What organizations, industries and/or positions are on your wish list? Art Museum Curator (curatorial Assistant/curatorial fellow), Art industry (Christie’s/Sotheby’s), and Arts/culture writer (news publication). I don’t know as much about the art industry but would like to know more.

What questions would you like to ask an employer? What types of degrees are most valuable in your field? What are average salaries? How fast do people move up in your industry? What are opportunities to take advantage of that could help set a student apart in an applicant pool?

 

Undergraduate student: Art History and Public Policy double major
Graduation: May 2020

During the course of the internship, I was able to grow not only as a researcher and art historian but also as a professional working in a fast-paced, international environment. I became comfortable speaking Italian and picking up phrases in Spanish, French, and German to greet all visitors to the museum. My previous experience taking Italian courses at Duke was especially helpful, since I knew common verbs and conjugations necessary for day-to-day interaction. In addition, I had the opportunity to give an hour-long tour in Mandarin to friends of the museum, which challenged me to translate art concepts from English to Chinese. I am currently studying in New York as part of the Duke in New York: Arts and Media program, where there are six former interns working or studying the art industries. The internship created a strong arts network for me that extends across the United States and abroad. I learned how to tailor my talks to a wide variety of backgrounds; though some visitors were intimately familiar with the details of art history, others had no exposure to art previously. I learned to craft my talks with necessary art movement knowledge as well as fun stories and tidbits about the people involved in the production of art. I managed to emphasize my interest in research and took the initiative to write a draft of an audio guide for the sculpture garden and present it to my intern coordinators. This past summer internship experience cemented the path I wish to pursue: graduate school for art history and becoming a curator. I was utterly fascinated by the planning and conceptualization that goes into a successful exhibition, and I hope to be working in the museum field in the future.
 

Undergraduate student: Economics major
Graduation: May 2020

I went into last summer with high expectations for my internship. I wanted to get a deep dive into civil law and get a sense for whether I was interested in pursuing a career in civil legal services, or more broadly, poverty law. Furthermore, I wanted to not only observe, but contribute to the litigation in meaningful ways, above and beyond administrative tasks and paperwork. The organization I was interning with focuses on family, housing, public benefits and consumer law. Through the varied experiences, I was able to work on different types of cases including a public benefits class action, political asylum claims, an insurance subrogation suit, and eviction defenses.

The most unexpected part of my summer was a summer-long project that I pitched and created focusing on data analytics. In this project, I was directly supervised by the Legal Director and tasked to analyze internal client databases to identify trends and areas for growth. I was able to then present that project to the full staff. This project allowed me to develop my analytical skills as well as time management and public speaking abilities more so than I expected. I also was able to learn Tableau, a data visualization software, and some basics of GIS mapping in the process of the project. I thoroughly enjoyed the summer and the work that I was able to do. I appreciated the experience so much because I was able to ask to work on cases or have projects in the areas I was interested in, which facilitated my fast learning of different legal concepts and legal jargon. Another highlight of the summer were the events that were set up as part of the internship program. We had a robust orientation, regular brown bag lunches with supervising attorneys of the different units and upper-level management. There were other events that augmented my learning of poverty law and more fully immersed me in this realm. The internship solidified my desire to litigate and broadened my passions in different areas of law. Coming out of this past summer, I am more interested than ever in civil law and civil rights, though I haven’t lost my interest in criminal justice reform. I have a better understanding of the legal services industry, both in terms of the types of cases seen as well as the lifestyle and workload of attorneys. I was able to get into the weeds with different types of civil cases, and I gained insight into the different avenues in which lawyers can make social change. 
 

Undergraduate student: English major
Graduation: May 2019

I interned at a small film production company. Through writing script coverage and pitching projects during the weekly intern meetings, I improved my ability to analyze written texts and express my opinion on their merits and faults in a concise, convincing manner. I spent a majority of my time reading screenplays and books and writing script coverage, which consists of a one-sentence summary called a log line, a one-page synopsis, and a half-page of comments where I argue whether the work should be a “Pass” or “Consider.” Crafting these log lines and synopses challenged me to use strong action verbs and eliminate unnecessary details and filler words. I learned how to make a formal development pitch: I describe what I read, compare it to similar movies, and explain why I liked or disliked it as succinctly and brief as possible. Simply put, my internship pushed me to be a critical thinker and an effective communicator; and I was able to gain a better understanding of the (entertainment) industry.
 

Undergraduate student: International Comparative Studies (concentration in Latin America/the Caribbean), and Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (concentration in Arabic language) double major
Graduation: May 2019

Describe your current research and recent internship. I'm currently writing an honors thesis with the ICS department about my experience with a fact-checking organization stationed in Buenos Aires that I got to spend two months with over the summer, hanging out in their office and working on projects with their journalists and administrators. The goal of my project is to understand the information crisis plaguing journalists and media & news consumers all over the world, and hopefully shed some light on how twenty-first century societies can work towards rediscovering the truth.

What have you learned most from your internship and research? After two months of interviewing journalists and hanging out with the team at the organization, I came to realize that although not every media environment is the same, twenty-first-century news producers across the globe are facing very similar issues within their own contexts.

What type of academic or career options are you interested in pursuing? I'm interested in pursuing a career in journalism, although I'm currently looking for opportunities to continue doing research. My goal right now is to become more familiar with different media environments, in order to keep learning about myself and the world around me.

What organizations, industries and/or positions are on your wish list? I have my sights set on a fact-checking startup in Madrid called Newtral.

 

Undergraduate student: Mathematics major
Graduation: May 2019

This past summer, as a teaching fellow intern I learned that working with and mentoring middle school kids gave me deep satisfaction, but I was often left frustrated that I couldn’t get at deeper-lying issues that could not be properly addressed in a few short weeks. Teaching math was worth it for the ‘aha’ moments; and I had some incredible moments with our students with special needs even when faced with circumstances that I had never previously considered. While before I thought I knew that the high school level was for me, the middle schoolers this summer have called that into question. The constant challenges they posed and the immense joy they brought me had me thinking regularly about how I could better serve the students. My internship experience allowed the invaluable mental processes to start in my head: What kind of teacher do I want to be? How do I differentiate instruction? To what extent am I willing to let important conversation go when it is off-topic? More broadly, I felt a sense of belonging and an authentic version of myself emerge when surrounded by such a passionate young group of educators. Mentoring, supporting, advocating for, and believing in children feels like the work I should be doing, and I have my past summer internship to thank for that.

 

Undergraduate student: Psychology, and Visual & Media Studies double major
Graduation: May 2020

After studying away through the Duke in Los Angeles program last year, I was hoping that my recent summer internship in creative development at a film company would allow me to leverage my professional momentum in Los Angeles by maintaining the invaluable contacts I have formed, as well as establishing new relationships with different members of the film industry. Furthermore, I was hoping to learn more about multiple aspects of entertainment and finally discover which part of the industry I might want to pursue upon graduation. While working at a talent agency all of last semester, I was broadly introduced to the different departments within the film industry yet found myself consistently drawn to creative development. I have always been intrigued by how easily I can fall headfirst into the diverse worlds created by studios and watch as extravagant characters manage everyday life.

As a creative development intern, my main responsibility was to evaluate potential projects and creators being sent to the department. I read a plethora of screenplays, books, short stories, and articles, in order to make recommendations for the company’s future projects as well as give my opinion about whether or not I think each piece would be a particularly good fit for the company. Over the course of the summer, I saw tremendous growth in my ability to analyze an incoming project and support the claims I made to my supervisors regarding my thoughts on the piece. s someone who has always wanted to pursue a career in the film industry but has never been certain as to which department I would fit best in to, it was an eye-opening experience to be able to ask seasoned veterans in each department about a day in the life of their jobs.

Overall, my experience this past summer has easily been the most rewarding and exciting of my life. Being able to emerge my passion for reading and writing with my excitement to share the incredible stories of humanity’s triumphs and failures with the world is something I truly do not believe I could have found through any other internship. I always knew that I wanted to move to Los Angeles after graduating from Duke University, but I now have a far more concrete plan regarding which aspect of the industry I wish to pursue and how I can achieve that goal.

 

Graduate student: Masters of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program
Grad. Year: May 2019

Describe your current research/project. I'm writing, directing and editing a feature length documentary film that investigates the layered history of a place by following unexpected connections in the landscape and its people. While my story is focused on Durham, it will be of interest for an audience in any city that grapples with reconciling the legacies of those featured in its monuments and street names. I am combining my interests in documentary film with computational media techniques, such as photogrammetry and image recognition, to create both a film and interactive installation show that brings this layered history to life, within the community.

What have you learned most from your research/project? I have years of experience creating nonfiction video shorts for editorial outlets and clients, but this is the first time I am following a narrative based on my own research. I'm learning a lot about how to follow an idea independently and see it through to the end. I have experience managing large production budgets and overseeing crews as a producer, but now I am learning how to do those tasks from the creative standpoint as a director.

What type of academic or career options are you interested in pursuing or exploring? Film & media directing, documentary filmmaking, production company, creative agencies, branded content

What organizations, industries and/or positions are on your wish list? New York & LA media companies, like HBO, Netflix, A21, or creative agencies, or creative departments in a large tech company like Facebook or Google Creative Labs

What questions would you want to ask an employer? How do you see (short-form or long-form) documentary filmmaking fitting into your future content plans? What are the opportunities for interactivity and new media within your company? Do you offer continuing education opportunities?

Graduate Student Receives 2018 Princess Grace Award 

A graduate student in Experimental and Documentary Arts Program receives distinguished award. Read the full article

Students are Tuning in to POLIS 

Listen to the POLIS podcast, Duke University’s Center for Political Leadership, Innovation, and Service.

Students Helping Students at Pop Up Thrift Store 

The first pop up thrift store was featured on campus in January to allow students to donate and get free gently used clothing, and dorm and office items. This was a great opportunity for students to learn about the benefits of reusing and reducing waste.

Upcoming Career Center Events

Visit CareerConnections for more information

**Attention NC Employers or Employers with offices in North Carolina--Join us for the 20/20 Vision Conference!

20/20 Vision: Attracting & Hiring Duke Students
A Conference for NC Employers

Join Duke University Career Center, NC employers, Duke faculty, and career professionals to learn best practices for recruiting success at Duke, build relationships with Duke, learn about Duke talent and initiatives, and to network and share ideas with your peers. Set your sights on the 2019-2020 recruiting season and beyond! Please contact Monique Turrentine for more information about this free event.

Prepare for Fall Recruiting Season

Contact the Employer Relations team, career-employer@studentaffairs.duke.edu to schedule a call to discuss your recruiting strategy and learn about targeted events.

 

Winter 2019 Issue

Undergraduate student: Environmental Engineering major
Graduation: May 2019

I interned at a consulting firm for 9 weeks, as I left to study abroad in Australia mid-July. I was interning on an engineering project, specifically in an office that dealt with water treatment and waste water treatment systems in the DMV area. Daily tasks included checking submittals with specifications, site visits, sitting in on meetings about project progression and emerging technologies, and reading blueprints and performing value engineering. The best thing about my experience were the site visits. The experience served invaluable at exposing me to work as an engineer, specifically at a large consulting corporation.

Undergraduate student: Mechanical Engineering major
Graduation: May 2019

While working at a large oil and gas company, my group put me on a challenging and rewarding project. I was working with the Heat Transfer group of Research and Engineering, and though I haven't taken Heat Transfer yet, they had me working on in-depth research and analysis on different heat transfer phenomenon in refineries. When I completed the initial projects they gave me, which were design and research based, they provided extra work related to investigative engineering/troubleshooting and modeling, which was great. The work I was doing was adding value and meaningful, because I was helping increase efficiency of refining processes and predict emissions, which also falls in line with my goals. Overall, I had a great experience and learned a lot, and was able to take away many valuable skills and lessons from my time there.

Undergraduate student: Interdept. Neuro/Computer Science major
Graduation: December 2018

I worked at a startup company as an iOS developer for 40 hours a week. I had a great mentor and was given tons of responsibility - the best things about the internship.

Undergraduate student: Psychology and Statistical Science double major
Graduation: May 2019

Last summer's project was an immensely valuable and unparalleled research experience for me individually. A university brain science lab allowed me to be involved in parts of research I had never considered myself to even be interested in before. Particularly, animal research, wet lab work, and research design. For example, when I first entered the lab I was in charge of entering data into SPSS, something I had done before. However, soon after I had finished with that, I was allowed to work with the rats – cleaning their cages, restraining and shocking them, and finally decapitating them as the procedure calls for. I finally learned how to pipette through this lab, and was able to help with the many assays the lab did. These assays often took upwards of 12 hours, but I was able to observe and use many equipment during it. I worked with Elisa kits, multichannel pipettes, and vortex machines.

I also learned how to interpret the results from Elisa kits. Additionally, we ran many different kinds of assays. While in previous labs I have observed DNA and RNA extraction processes, in this lab I aided with BDNF, Neuropeptide Y, cortisol, and IGF assays in both humans and rats. I was also given an independent project in which I was to design a research experiment to test OCD in rats. However, OCD is one disorder where it is hard to find an equivalent animal model. Through many weeks of research, I found one model that was sufficient for the lab – the signal attenuation model. After becoming an expert on the mechanisms behind this model and learning the parallels it held to actual OCD, I presented a 40-minute presentation on this topic (Signal attenuation and OCD animal models) to the lab and performed well. Looking at the data and learning about the mechanisms behind PTSD and OCD as well as the mechanisms behind the analogous models were very interesting to me, and increased my interest in pursuing a career in statistics.

Undergraduate student: Statistical Science major
Graduation: May 2019

In a recent summer internship, I worked on Media Mix Modeling (MMM) to forecast new customers from TV ads impression in English. This is a data science project to understand where and how much the company should spend on TV advertising. We link the audience impression from each of the TV ads to the organic new customer orders on their website, and build models to forecast how much they should spend on TV ads in each daypart (primetime vs daytime vs midnight, etc.), on weekend vs weekdays, on local channels vs national broadcasts, and so on. The completion of this project would directly inform the company’s decision of its $200k budget each day on TV advertising. I learned how to effectively communicate with and seek help from other data scientists and the developer. I’m interested in pursuing a career in data science with a focus on informing business strategy, in the e-commerce industry.

What questions would you want to ask an employer? Are your data scientists decentralized/ embedded in each team? Or are they centralized? How does a data scientist influence the business decisions in your company?

Undergraduate student: BSE Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science major
Graduation: May 2021

Q: Describe your current research/project.

I am a member of Duke Electric Vehicles - an undergraduate engineering club that competes in the annual Shell Eco-Marathon. The Eco-Marathon is a global competition to design high-efficiency vehicles using internal combustion engines, hydrogen fuel cells, or batteries. The team has cars for two categories: Prototype Battery Electric and Prototype Hydrogen Fuel Cell.

Q: What have you learned most from your research/project?

I have been most involved with the car's mechanical systems, and to that end had my first introduction to mechanical design assisted by simulations. I have learned to design with a focus on reducing weight with help from Finite Element Analysis and have been introduced to the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics in improving our carbon fibre monocoque.

Q: What type of work or career options are you interested in pursuing or exploring?

I am primarily interested in aerospace and robotics engineering. My hope is to be able to work on interplanetary probes, rovers, or even manned space missions.

Q: What companies, industries and/or positions are on your wish list?

Growing up in Houston, NASA has been a clear wish of mine. I am also interested in the research being done at Boston Dynamics, SpaceX, Blue Origin, and Boeing.

Q: What questions would you want to ask an employer?

In my search for employment, I am most interested in participating in a culture of investigation. I would want to ask an employer about the driving principles behind their research, and what they do organizationally to realize this.

Undergraduate student: Biomedical Engineering major
Graduation: May 2021

Q: Describe your current research/project.

I worked in a bioengineering lab at a university in Texas. My project throughout the summer is one that focuses on extracting DNA from human APRE cells and analyzing it as a means to ensure cell viability post-implantation surgeries.

Q: What have you learned most from your research/project?

I have learned lab climate. Because I had never worked in a lab before, the entire experience was novel with much learning throughout.

Q: What companies, industries and/or positions are on your wish list?

I’m interested in the Pharma-tech industry.

Graduate student: Physics Ph.D. candidate
Graduation: August 2020

Q: Describe your current research/project.

At Duke, I work in condensed matter physics, cooling microscopic pieces of carbon to temperatures within a fraction of a degree of absolute zero. I study quantum effects in this atomically thin carbon (called graphene) by probing it with electrical currents and electromagnetic fields. Ultimately, this work may help build a reliable qubit - the building block of a future quantum computer which will outperform current technologies.

Q: What have you learned most from your research/project?

A series of soft skills that surround and encompass setting goals, making timelines, and managing a project with highly technical aspects and idiosyncratic collaborators.

Q: What type of work or career options are you interested in pursuing or exploring? I am particularly interested in careers that provide teaching opportunities. I have pursued this passion at Duke in parallel with my research.

Q: What companies, industries and/or positions are on your wish list? Teaching in higher education as a professor at a teaching-focused college/university or as teaching faculty Science communication, science editing/writing

Q: What questions would you want to ask an employer? Is maintaining a work-life balance encouraged at your company or institution? How? How long do employees typically stay with your company or institution? What are the opportunities for advancement?

 

Spotlight on a Student Organization at Duke

Duke Electric Vehicles (DEV) Sets the Guinness World Record for the most fuel-efficient vehicle. Read the article.

Zoom Out: The Duke Career Center Podcast

By Nathan Wilson, M.Ed.

The idea behind Zoom Out was to present questions to students that they may not be asking themselves, but are critical for finding meaning and happiness in their lives. Duke students can figure out any problem, but how can they find answers to questions never asked? College is a time when students have increasing agency to make decisions and pursue their own interests, which comes with a lot of internal and external pressures. Zoom Out was created to provide big-picture, self-reflective information using a medium that students can utilize on their own time so that they can be intentional about the choices they make at Duke and beyond. Such topics can be daunting, however, so I aimed to keep it light while providing students with some food for thought during the exciting, but often intimidating, process of professional development.  

 

Internship Funding Sources for Undergraduate Students

By Leigh Ann Waring, M.A.

Summer funding is offered through several centers on campus, including the Duke Career Center. One of the funding sources available only to Duke University undergraduate students is the Career Center’s Internship Funding Program. The Internship Funding Program aims to reduce the financial challenges associated with participating in a wide range of low-paying or unpaid internships, thereby achieving the objectives of facilitating student participation in experiential career exploration and expanding the diversity of internship opportunities in which Duke students participate.

Through the generosity of corporate, individual and class donors, the Career Center is able to offer competitive grants ranging from $600 to $3,000 for undergraduate students who accept unpaid or low-paying summer internships. First-year students, sophomores, juniors, and first semester seniors from all academic majors are encouraged to apply. Students must be in good standing with the university and complete all steps in the application process in order to be considered. Students do not need a confirmed internship offer at the time of application, however offers will be verified prior to the processing of funding awards.

Unpaid or low-paying summer internships that provide students with a minimum of 240 hours of experience are eligible for funding. The Duke Career Center defines a low-paying internship as providing a student with $1500 or less gross pay for the summer (including both hourly wage and stipend wages). Supervised research projects are also eligible for funding. The Internship Funding Program is an application-based program and awards are granted at the recommendation of a university selection committee. The Career Center encourages all students to seek out all funding opportunities for which they qualify.

 

Undergraduates Experience their First Year at Duke Kunshan University

Undergraduate students joined graduate students at Duke Kunshan University this past August. Graduate programs in Master of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Master of Environmental Policy, Master of Science in Medical Physics, Master of Science in Global Health, and the Master of Management Studies have been at the Duke Kunshan campus for the past four years. Undergraduates will study an interdisciplinary curriculum while preparing for global careers. Read the full article

 

The New Master in Interdisciplinary Data Science (MIDS) Program at Duke

Duke University’s first program in data science will educate and train Master’s students in practical decision-making, machine learning, modeling and representation, text analysis, visualization and storytelling, and ethics. Learn more about the MIDS program.

 

Duke Students, Faculty and Staff Gain Knowledge in Machine Learning and Data Science

No one has to miss out on the opportunity to learn about data science and machine learning. There are online courses offered through Coursera and +Data Science workshops. Read the full article. Employers can participate in Data-Driven Decision Making and other courses via Fuqua Executive Education. Duke University Career Center hosted its first annual Data Analytics and Data Science Networking Event for several employers to meet with over 100 eligible Duke students. Stay connected for more information about the next event in fall 2019.

 

Inside Virtual Reality at Duke

Duke DiVE, Bolt VR, TEC VR and Multimedia Project Studio are some of the virtual reality locations on Duke’s campus. Read full article.

 

Upcoming Career Center Events

For more information, visit CareerConnections , Events@Duke Calendar, Career Center webpage

  • TechConnect on January 22
  • Career & Summer Opportunities Fair on January 24

 

Other Important Information

 

Attention North Carolina Employers

We want to connect with you! Share insight about your organization and involvement in our local community, and expand your knowledge of how Duke students can become your next stellar intern and colleague. Contact Monique Turrentine, monique.turrentine@duke.edu, for more information.

 

 

Fall 2018 Issue

Undergraduate student: Biology major '20

I am a part of a community building committee for an international partner of Duke’s student-run organization GlobeMed. As a club, we work with the leaders of the organization throughout the entire academic year on projects to support their mission of providing health, education, and development resources for the underserved populations of Shirati. The goal for this internship was to further strengthen our partnership and productivity by building relationships that only fieldwork can provide. I personally wanted to be a part of the Grassroots On-Site Work (GROW) team to find out if I could see myself in a global health profession as well as to develop important character traits such as the ability to be flexible when things do not turn out as expected, understanding of cultural and social differences in the community, and innovative when circumstances require thinking outside of the box. I developed all of these features as well as the ability to work efficiently as a team, appreciate others’ perspectives, and communicate effectively even with a constraining language barrier. I learned that in order for a global health intervention to be effective, a strong effort to understand the problems facing the community by people actually living in the community is crucial.

Undergraduate student: Biomedical Engineering major '19

Last summer, I participated in a three-part rotation within a medical device manufacturer’s peripheral interventions division. I worked in regulatory affairs, clinical affairs, and medical affairs. A lot of the work I did consisted of going between engineers and the FDA to ensure product compliance. I also did lots of work with clinical trial design and medical education. The internship was a great foot in the door to the medical device industry and strengthened my knowledge of technical writing and of medical devices in general. By far, my favorite aspect of the program was the cross-functional learning I was able to do with R&D, process development, and manufacturing engineers.

This summer, I returned to the medical device manufacturer for a second summer internship as a Research & Development Intern in their Peripheral Interventions division. In this role, I’m doing lots of white space mapping and exploratory work. Most of my time is spent researching disease states, prototyping new medical devices, and testing my designs against current products from our company and competitors. I’m learning a lot about medical device design from other engineers and from physicians that provide feedback on our designs. Knowing that these devices will improve people’s lives makes it really rewarding work.

Undergraduate student: Economics major '20

I pursued an internship to gain broad insight of the rural economic conditions in Nepal and the way financial institutions are helping local development. I had to do many field trips and site visits while reading and evaluating reports specific to the projects. For example, one of the remarkable visits was Patan Durbar Square, which is in the Kathmandu Valley. It was interesting to see how the slow reconstruction process has been detrimental to the tourism economy in the city. Working with a motivated team of community finance leaders, I gained a range of skills such as: communication, organization, networking, and problem-solving. I learned how to do an unbiased analysis and to think of the confounding factors that can mislead the conclusions. By the end of the summer, I realized that I have been able to accumulate a large spectrum of information and understanding of rural economy and the rate to which it is progressing.

Undergraduate student: Economics major '19

I (previously) participated in the Data Science for Social Good program at a well-known university. I worked on a team with three undergrads, three grad students, and two professors on a couple of projects related to housing justice. We analyzed data on property taxes, predatory lending, etc. and created tools for non-profit partners. DSSG was a great experience that combined a lot of my varied interests with opportunities for mentorship and a clear positive societal benefit.

Undergraduate student: Economics and Asian & Middle East Studies double major '20

I expected to be doing a lot of research in both Turkish and English on the Middle East. While that was a small portion of my work at a think tank, I performed a lot of different tasks that exposed me to many different elements of think tank work. I also volunteered to work in the editorial department. I was in charge of managing communications with guest writers and scholars to process payments for their articles. In addition, I edited incoming articles in accordance with their style guide, and updated their website with new research when necessary. I believe that the experiences I had at Duke prior to beginning my internship really helped me perform well once I began working. At Duke, I’m involved in research for a lab focused on the Middle East. Writing for the lab at Duke helped me to build the necessary skills for quickly conducting research and consolidating information at the organization. One way in which I could have set myself up better for success would have been to take better advantage of the resources and workshops hosted by the Career Center and other organizations at Duke. I’m also excited about the relationships I built over the summer—there were 16 other interns working at the organization this summer who are all passionate about the Middle East. Hearing their stories and the opportunities they’ve taken advantage of was a great experience, and I’ve come away from there determined to explore some of the doors that have been opened for me.

Undergraduate student: Economics and Mathematics double major '20

I spent last summer interning at a bank in Vietnam as a Loan Officer Assistant. I received intensive training under the supervision of the department manager to learn about the loan application process, including methods to collect customers’ financial information, conduct preliminary evaluation of their eligibility to use loan services, and provide assistance for customers to complete their loan applications. In addition, I was assigned to assist the loan officers to outsource potential customers and learn to provide them with an introduction to our available banking services. My responsibilities also included performing daily administrative tasks in the office such as inputting and uploading data to the system and reviewing customers’ application status. Since day one, I strived to build a good relationship with my co-workers by showing my willingness and enthusiasm to learn and help. Therefore, my colleagues were very willing to share with me their personal experiences about what they had been through, how they coped with their struggles and what skills one should have in order to succeed in the banking industry. These were among the most valuable lessons, which helped me shape my goals and directions regarding professional development. I learned that in order to succeed in the banking or finance industry, interpersonal, communication and customer service skills are utterly crucial. I believe that the education at Duke had trained my critical thinking and analytical skills that helped me make the most of my internship. My internship experience truly enhanced my interest in the banking and finance industries and sparked in me a lot of inquiries regarding their customer service aspect as well as their working mechanisms and macro-scale impacts on the economy. I thoroughly enjoyed the hands-on tasks that I was assigned and the challenges of resolving problems quickly and effectively in a real world setting. At Duke, I aspire to improve my economic knowledge and necessary interpersonal skills through exposure to research and my involvement in the Duke Business Oriented Women Association.

Undergraduate student: Public Policy major '20

I spent last summer interning for a non-profit law firm, working specifically on their Mental Health Project. The organization provides free legal aid, advice, and services to low-income New Yorkers. I did some of the work of a paralegal- preparing for hearings, assisting with client hearings and interviewing, legal research, and transcriptions. I also worked on developing the online presence of the organization through various social media initiatives. I photographed events, produced promotional graphics and videos, and managed each of the Mental Health Project's social media accounts. Overall, my summer in New York City was extremely meaningful. Some of the highlights include my correspondence with incarcerated individuals as well as a visit to Riker's Island to assist with client interviews. I made fast friends with the other interns in the office, and my relationships with them are lasting. One of my favorite moments came towards the end of the summer. After preparing for nearly three weeks for a client hearing, summarizing hundreds of pages of medical records, the attorney in charge of the case allowed me to sit in on the hearing. He won a victory for our client, a woman with a myriad of illnesses and allergies who had been denied disability benefits. That day was particularly rewarding. 

 

Spotlight on a Student Organization at Duke

Meet the Duke Advanced Professional Degree Consulting Club (Duke APDCC)

By the Co-Chairs of Professional Development for the Duke APDCC

The field of consulting is fast-growing and fast-paced, and the Duke Advanced Professional Degree Consulting Club (APDCC) members are here to make an impact on a wide variety of industries. Duke APDCC is the campus's largest student-run consulting club, having grown to 600+ members since its inception in 2012. We work to enhance career opportunities and provide education and development for advanced degree students interested in the consulting industry. In the last five years, we have hosted multiple nation-wide case competitions, attracting students from more than 20 elite universities. We also host case interview workshops and inter-disciplinary networking events, with guest speakers and alumni from top consulting firms providing industry orientation and connections through our industry outreach. Recently, we launched our own Micro-Consulting Project Program to bring the expertise of Duke APDCC consulting teams to more than a dozen companies in diverse industries, providing real industry experience. Our mission is to provide our clients with effective solutions from dedicated collegiate expertise. We aim to bring consulting capabilities to students of all backgrounds. We can be reached at https://sites.duke.edu/dukeapdconsulting/, or by email at duke-apd-consulting@duke.edu.

First-Year Initiative for Undergraduate Students

by Alicia Rhodes and Christina Plante

The Duke University Career Center has two dedicated career counselors to lead the First-Year Initiative. The purpose of this initiative is to help students discover what they are curious about and develop clarity and skills that will allow them to design their success at Duke and beyond. The Career Center has created 7 Competencies for Post-Graduate Success that answer how students can go from curiosity to clarity and work towards achieving their goals. We mainly focus on "Reflect" and "Connect", the two foundational competencies that encourage students to think deeply about past experiences and connect with individuals who may share similar interests. All seven competencies are listed online. With help from employers, this year’s events for first year and sophomore students include:

  • Major Mixer
    A first-year and sophomore mixer for students to chat with academic advisors, peer advisors, alumni, employers, Directors of Undergraduate Studies and career counselors for advice on choosing their major.
  • PreHealth Check Up
    A panel of health professionals will provide information on research, volunteering, shadowing, and health careers for first year students. 
  • Consulting Case Interviewing Clinic
    Casual, fun way to understand and practice case interviewing. Hear from professionals and students who have successfully completed case interviews and work with professionals to polish case interview response skills. 
  • Practice Interview Days
    A chance for students to brush up on their interview skills as they begin applying for internships, campus jobs, and leadership roles. Practice interviews will last 30 minutes, and will include a post-interview discussion and critique.
  • Fannie Mitchell Expert in Residence Program
    Visiting experts in a wide variety of fields give a campus talk and meet individually with students to provide career advice.
  • Secrets to Success: Class of 2022 Edition
    A first-year only event where two Duke students will present First-Year's most relevant and frequently asked questions to David Ong, Senior Director of Corporate Recruiting at MAXIMUS Inc., and Bill Wright-Swadel, Assistant VP of Student Affairs, Fannie Mitchell Executive Director of the Duke University Career Center. 
  • Ignite Your Internship Search
    A unique, high-energy event where you will discover internships with leading-edge employers. In addition, hear recruiters’ and Duke alumni’s top advice on conducting a successful search across all industries.
  • Table for Six
    An exploration event for first years in partnership with the Alumni Association. Sign up to have dinner with area alumni and learn more about their fields. 
  • Ready, Set, Intern!
    Learn firsthand from previous interns and representatives from organizations with competitive internship programs how to maximize success and avoid common mistakes during your summer experience.
  • Additional Career Center events: First Big Week, Career Fair Back Stage Pass, Summer Opportunities Fair, DEMAN 101, Duke Career Center Internship Funding Program Info Sessions, and InternMix: Peer to Peer Intern Mixer

Duke Common Experience Summer Reading Program for Undergraduate First-Year Students

What book is the Duke Class of 2022 Reading this Year? Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward. The Duke Common Experience Summer Reading Program originated in 2001 in an effort to prepare students for life at Duke and for knowledgeable conversations with their new classmates. Ms. Ward will talk with students during Orientation Week in August. [More information about the program]

Summer 2018 Employer Site Visits to Q2 Solutions and Precision Biosciences for Grad Students and Postdocs

The Career Center organized local site visits to Q2 Solutions/EA Genomics and Precision Biosciences for graduate students, postdocs, and recent alumni. During the site visit to Q2 Solutions/EA Genomics (an IQVIA quest joint venture) in Morrisville, there was a corporate presentation, tour of the facilities, and panel discussion with key employees from various teams including translational genomics, bioinformatics, lab operations, sales, isolations, and project management. We're preparing for our visit to Precision Biosciences in Durham for a company presentation, networking and office tour. Special thank you to our employer partners, Q2 Solutions and Precision Biosciences!

Careers Beyond Academia Series for Graduate Students

This fall, in the Careers Beyond Academia series, graduate students and post-doctorates are getting training in: effective resume characteristics for various industries, translating the full impact of their research and achievements, impressionable interview techniques, designing a career path (via self-assessments and group activities), communicating and leveraging their transferable (soft) skills.

3D Doctor Dolls at Duke

"Duke's collection of ivory anatomical manikins --the largest in North America --is being digitized for the first time." [Read the full article]

Upcoming Career Center Events

For more information, visit CareerConnections , Duke University Event Calendar, Career Center Employer website 

Data Analytics & Data Science Networking Event September 12

Student & Employer Diversity Symposium September 25

Tech Connect September 25

Fall Career Fair September 26

NC Master's & Doctoral Career Fair November 13

 

What’s New?!

Welcome to GradLeaders!
The new CareerConnections online system for recruiting and posting jobs and events for students and alumni via the Duke University Career Center has gotten a much needed facelift.

 

For Students

Spring 2019 Issue

Employer Name: BnaFit

Industry: Technology, Media, Consumer Products, Startup

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

I was a design studies major, yoga instructor, and current CEO of BnaFit. I taught paddleboard yoga in Hawaii and that is where the idea from this company was born.

Tell us about the company culture and job opportunities at BnaFit.

BnaFit is a startup working out of HQ Raleigh downtown. The company was started by an NCSU graduate and NCSU professor (Go Pack!). Our mission is to create a community of encouragement around movement. If you are passionate about community, fitness, apps, and startups then this could be the job for you! We want someone who wants to be a part of the company vision, innovation, and growth. 

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

We have created a toolbox for the top influential fitness trainers to monetize their fan base.

What are some new initiatives underway at BnaFit?

We have just finished doing fitness shoots with reality TV star from The Bachelor and NFL Falcon trainers as well in Nashville and Atlanta.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with BnaFit?

We are looking for a front end app developer to join our team. The Front-End Developer/Software Development/UI Developer will design, code, test and analyze software programs and applications. This includes researching, designing, documenting and modifying software specifications. Application developers have the duty of maintaining and implementing the source code that makes up the application or program.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at BnaFit?

Strong understanding of web development technologies and frameworks, including responsive web development, react/react native, and UI-design. Create mockups, wireframes, and layouts that promote ease of use and optimize how users interact with new features.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

Computer science is the field we are looking for (undergrads and grads).

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

We want someone who wants to be a dedicated member of our startup. Someone who is a strong developer but is also an innovative thinker. This person should be able to come up with ideas, talk with the team, and implement solutions.

What is one question that you would like to ask students?

We want to know if you are a talented developer and team player who wants to be a part of a fast-growing startup.

 

Employer Name: Meeting Street Schools

Industry: Education

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

Jackie Kohlhepp, Chief of Operations: After obtaining my Masters in Social Work, I began my career as a clinical social worker. After working in the micro practice field of social work, I realized that my passion is truly systems work and empowering others to effect systems level change. I currently serve to facilitate and support operations at Meeting Street Schools (MSS) as the organization's Chief of Operations.

Tell us about the work culture at Meeting Street Schools (MSS).

At Meeting Street Schools, we always put kids first. This student-focused mentality is the primary driver of our culture. We have a growth mindset and model that for our students. Our students, teachers and families openly give and receive feedback with the intention of promoting personal and professional growth.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

At Meeting Street Schools, we believe that the most important thing we do is provide excellent instruction to students. Every MSS team member from the principal to the school receptionist, has this same goal in mind. Something that sets our model apart is that each principal is the CEO of their school. We currently have four locations in South Carolina (3 in Charleston and 1 in Spartanburg). The principal of each school is able to make decisions that are best for the students and families at their school.

The MSS network team is also unique in that it functions to bring each principal's vision to life and eliminate barriers to their work with kids. This practice often looks different than a traditional school district. MSS also operates on a unique public-private partnership model with two local school districts (Charleston County School District and Spartanburg District 7). Through these partnerships, 3 of our schools are public schools. The school districts pay the typical per cost per pupil amount and MSS layers on additional wrap-around services (two teachers per core classroom, students start at age 3, operating on an extended school day, etc.).

What are some new initiatives underway at MSS?

At Meeting Street Schools, we consider ourselves to be a social justice organization. We are currently working to provide professional development to all of our team members to ensure that everyone within our organization understands the racial and socio-economic barriers that our students often face in the classroom and beyond. We are also reviewing our understanding of student support services. We think about student support in terms of overall health (physical, social-emotional, mental health, etc.).

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with MSS?

Duke students should demonstrate a passion for education and working with elementary school age students. Duke students should research Meeting Street Schools by visiting our website to understand our model and approach to education. Duke students should have an understanding of the achievement gap in education and be able to speak to 1. the cause of the achievement gap, 2. hopes to reduce/eliminate the achievement gap through their work at MSS.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at MSS?

We look for motivated, optimistic individuals to be leaders in the classroom and beyond. We value candidates who have an education background and/or passion for education. Our most successful candidates have a growth mindset and value professional development. We seek out candidates who believe that kids deserve an excellent education, regardless of their background.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

Classroom teachers, Special Subjects teachers (Theater, Art, Dance, etc.), Data Manager and Director of Operations.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Know your values. Ask questions and meet people that work at companies you find interesting. Make sure that your personal and professional values align with the companies that you seek out.

What is one question that you would like to ask students?

What impact do you want to have as a working professional? What skills do you want to hone as a working professional? What issues are you passionate about and how do you envision yourself making a change?

 

Employer Name: Oracle Corporation

Industry: Technology

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

My current job title is Business Recruiter. I graduated with a Business Admin degree, and went into the Human Resources field and was promoted up from HR Assistant to HR Manager.

Tell us about Oracle and its culture.

Oracle offers a comprehensive and fully integrated stack of cloud applications, platform services, and engineered systems. We provide a complete technology stack both in the cloud and in the data center. The largest corporations and governments in the world use our market-leading products. Oracle employees enjoy competitive salaries, excellent health benefits, and a network of like-minded co-workers that drive innovation across the entire technology industry. Oracle’s world-class global strategic sales organization offers entry level inside sales and business development opportunities in a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to Oracle Digital, which has direct revenue responsibility and in some cases works in conjunction with field sales to improve sales resource utilization for market coverage. Other sales specializations include services, hardware, technology, and applications products. Focused on solution selling, Oracle is fast-paced and provides comprehensive training as well as performance-based compensation.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

Discounted Employee Stock Options are available to all employees

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with Oracle?

Understanding the general business of Oracle, who we are and what are some of the products/services we offer.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at Oracle?

Interpersonal skills and communications skills are valuable skills.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

Graduate students can also apply for the Business Development Consultant position.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Understand the business of whatever company you are interviewing with and make them feel like your interest is a genuine priority and not just another job interview.

 

Employer Name: SAGA Innovations/Education

Industry: Nonprofit/Education

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

My degree is in Marketing. I taught for two years abroad before serving as a SAGA Fellow. From there, I was promoted to leadership roles. I am currently the Assistant Director of Alumni Relations & Partnerships.

Tell us about the company culture at SAGA.

SAGA serves historically under-served young people through personalized, consistent, caring and best-in-the-world tutorials that result in youth gaining confidence and academic strength so that they see, pursue and realize their grandest dreams.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

We have Fellows from nearly every state in the country and abroad!

What are some new initiatives underway at SAGA?

Growing to more cities outside of NYC and Chicago

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with SAGA?

Growth mindset

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at SAGA?

Willingness to accept feedback and apply it.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We accept all majors from all backgrounds as our students come from all backgrounds as well.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Follow your passion and use your instinct to select the best role for you. Take a gap year!

Undergraduate Credit for Internship Experience

By Leigh Ann Waring, M.A., Assistant Director--Internships, Duke University Career Center

As the spring semester comes to an end, you may find yourself with a fantastic internship opportunity for the summer but in need of academic credit for the experience. This isn’t uncommon as many employers require students to receive academic credit for their internships as a way to have the university endorse the experience. Unfortunately, while Duke University encourages undergraduate students to pursue experiential learning such as internships, it does not grant academic credit for these experiences. However, do not despair! Although Duke doesn’t give credit for internships alone, there are a few options available that will provide you with the credit that you need:

  1. Credit by Independent Study 
    If you find yourself in a situation where you need academic credit for your internship, you can petition your academic department for a summer independent study project. Independent study projects provide the student with academic credit by completing a faculty-supervised (internship-related) project concurrently with your internship. The credit you receive is technically for the work that you have completed on the project; however, the majority of employers will accept the credit since the project was completed in relation to the internship. Independent studies must be initiated by the student so you are advised to start the process early as it may require several steps before it is finalized. A special note to add is that not every academic department offers independent study projects and the steps to arrange the project may vary by department. Students are encouraged to speak with their college advisor, dean, or program coordinator to learn whether this option is available to them and the specific steps required to arrange the project. See additional information online: Independent Study and Duke Internship Credit Policy
  2. Enrollment in Writing 270 
    If your academic department doesn’t provide independent study credit or if you don’t have the time to arrange a project, you may want to consider enrolling in Writing 270 for the summer. Designed specifically to provide undergraduate students with internship credit, this virtual course will satisfy employers’ credit requirements while teaching you to reflect and present your internship story through a variety of platforms (blogs, microblogs, etc.). This course is led by Dr. Denise Comer, Associate Professor of the Practice, Writing Studies. Interested students should contact Professor Comer for additional details and to obtain permission to register for the course. This is a popular option among students so you are advised to register early as the sections tend to fill quickly.
  3. Transfer Credit 
    One final option for students who are in need of internship credit is transfer credit. Students who are not able to arrange an independent study or enroll in Writing 270, can elect to earn credit from a university or community college outside of Duke. There are many institutions who have summer internship credit programs which can be used to satisfy employer requirements. If you are interested in pursuing this option, you must notify your Duke college advisor or dean prior to beginning the application process at the other institution. Your advisor will help you navigate the required steps for you to transfer the credit back to Duke. **In addition, when approaching the non-Duke institution, it is imperative that you state that you’re seeking credit as a transient student. This will prevent the institution from enrolling you as a continuing student and disrupting your financial aid and academic progress at Duke.

Students who wish to further discuss these credit-earning options for internships are encouraged to speak with their college advisor/dean, or schedule an appointment with a career adviser within the Career Center. Career counseling appointments can be scheduled by students via their CareerConnections account.

 

Resources for Veterans at Duke

By Rachel Coleman, M.S./Ed.S., Assistant Director, Graduate Student Career Services, Duke University Career Center

Currently, there are over 1,000 veterans at Duke, including students, faculty and staff. Veterans bring incredibly valuable perspectives, experiences, and skill sets to both educational institutions and the workforce. While it can be challenging to translate military experience to the civilian workforce, there are local and national resources available to assist.

Listed below are some resources to consider:

If you’re unsure of where or how to prepare for your post-Duke career, meet with a Career Center adviser to learn about resources, connect with fellow veterans, and receive guidance on how best to leverage transferable skills. Starting the career planning process early can help to facilitate a smooth, successful transition to the next phase of your career.  

 

Public Policy Resources & Podcasts for Exploring Careers

By Laura Coutts, M.Ed., Assistant Director, Graduate Student Career Services, Duke University Career Center

Interested in a career in public policy but don’t know what different jobs entail? There are several podcasts that can provide an insider’s perspective to different policy jobs and what you can do to prepare for those careers.

Sanford School of Public Policy Podcasts

Podcasts produced by Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy: Ways & MeansPolicy 360,The Leading Voices in Food, The Political Student (POLIS)
Where to find it: Sanford website

GovLove 

A podcast about local government employees, from city managers to interns. Recent episodes include conversations about local and federal drone laws, civic engagement in Bologna, Italy, and fostering an inclusive city.
Where to find it: iTunesStitcherSpotify

Working

From the online magazine Slate, one season of the show explored careers in and around the White House. Published from June 2016 – September 2016, hosts interviewed President Obama’s chief speechwriter, a Washington Post newspaper reporter embedded in the White House, as well as non-political appointees like a horticulturalist and the Director of Presidential Correspondence.If you’re interested in hearing how staff sort through thousands of letters to select the 5 the president receives from constituents every night, scroll back through the archives of this podcast.  
Where to find it: iTunesStitcher

Data Points

From the Center for Government Excellence (GovEx) at Johns Hopkins University, a group of “proud data fanatics” explore examples of how government can use data in effective–or not so effective–ways. Recent episodes contain conversations on solar power, improving science education, and food insecurity. They also recently covered some of the ways that Durham is using data to better serve residents.
Where to Find it: iTunes

The Podcast @ DC

Based in the Office of the City Administrator for the District of Columbia, The Lab @ DC is a group who uses research, data, and scientific methods to improve policies and produce analysis to inform city decisions. 
Where to find it: iTunesSoundcloud

The Weeds

This podcast actively ignores the advice to avoid getting lost in the weeds of politics. Twice weekly the hosts dig into the weeds – where politics become policy – on important national issues, including healthcare, immigration, and housing. Episode titles include gems like, "What's the Best Way to Help the Poor?" “Day care for all!” and “You can’t eat your principles for dinner.”
Where to find it: iTunesSpotifyStitcher

 

Recommended Reading

How Will You Measure Your Life? by Dr. Clayton M. Christensen

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey

Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts by Brene’ Brown

 

Winter 2019 Issue

Employer Name: AIG

Industry: Global Insurance Company

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

I got my degree in Economics/Political Science. Now, I am responsible for Early Career Recruiting at AIG for North America. I’ve been in Investment Banking my entire career and moved over to the Insurance industry this year.

Tell us about the company culture at AIG.

Insurance is evolving as advancements in technology revolutionize how we conduct business. AIG is leading the way at a rapid and exciting pace. We’re embracing technology and leveraging new data sources to more effectively assess risk and improve underwriting. AIG seeks a diverse workforce with a wide array of backgrounds and expertise to ensure our future success. Hiring the best talent will help us better understand the challenges facing the individuals and businesses that we work for all around the world.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

AIG promotes a place to have both an enriching careers as well as a life outside of work.

 

Employer Name: Hilti Asia

Industry: Construction

Tell us about company culture at Hilti Asia.

We have a high-performing culture for highly passionate people. If you’ve never worked in sales or construction, that’s not a problem. Success at Hilti is down to teamwork and ability, no matter what your background is.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

If you’re new to the industry, you might not have heard of us. We provide leading-edge tools, technologies, software and services for the global construction sector. We have a proud heritage, built over 75 years, and a worldwide reputation for pioneering products and exceptional service. With some 27,000 people in more than 120 countries, we’re a great place for you to show us your worth as you learn, grow and carve-out your career. We’re proud to be ranked in Great Places to Work 2017 as one of the world’s best multinational workplaces.

What are some new products underway at Hilti Asia?

ON!Track gives you complete clarity into what equipment and tools you have, where you can find them, who is using them, and when they need maintenance. With this critical information at your fingertips you can efficiently get your equipment and tools where they need to be — keeping your construction projects on track and profitable.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with Hilti Asia?

We’re looking for the next generation of high-performing, multi-lingual, post-graduate talents to take our company forward. Hilti Outperformer is a global management development program like no other, with real responsibility from day one.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at Hilti Asia?

People who join Hilti share a certain mindset. They’re driven and hard-working, and they excel at giving their best for our customers. In return, they enjoy an incredibly varied and dynamic career. Many of our people have been with us for 20 or 30 years - testament to how much we value and reward their contribution. What makes Hilti such a unique place to work is our high-performing culture. It’s based on a combination of personal performance, teamwork and support. We’re challenging but nurturing, daring but trusting. Show us what you’re made of and we’ll offer you opportunities to move around the business – to work abroad, experience different job functions and tackle different markets. It’s a great way to find the right match for your ambitions and achieve the exciting career you’re after.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We are currently recruiting for our Outperformer trainee, which is our global trainee programme. We’re open to students with different backgrounds: Economics, business administration, international management, engineering, marketing or finance for the Business Track; Engineering (mechanical or electrical, civil or industrial, aeronautical or materials science) and Logistics or supply chain management

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Be yourself. We’re here to meet the real you, so don’t be afraid to show it. We want people who’ll genuinely fit with our culture and thrive here. There’s no point in trying to be someone else: it doesn’t help you or us in the long run. So just relax and be you. Show passion. If you’re passionate about building a better future, we want to know about it. Please don’t feel inhibited by politeness or protocol. We’re looking for your energy and excitement, whether you know the industry or not. Be curious. We want people with a thirst to learn, courage to challenge and desire to improve things, including yourself. It’s how we get the best out of you to help us grow as a company and help you move up in your career. Talk openly. We don’t tick boxes, so please don’t worry about giving the ‘wrong’ answer. There’s no such thing. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses; it’s your ability to know your weaknesses and talk about them that sets you apart.

Invest a bit of time. Take some time to find out about our company before you come to meet us. Apart from showing us your curiosity, it’s a chance for you to demonstrate your passion for what we do and any attributes that relate to our values. Imagine working with us. We mean this quite literally – imagine yourself working with the people who are interviewing you. The Hilti way is strong, so the people sitting in front of you will be a good reflection of the teams you’ll be working with. If you can picture yourself working with your interviewers, you’re in the right place. Be transparent. We’re a people business and we’re all about personality. If you and we feel a strong personality match, things are looking good. So don’t think you have to answer questions a certain way, and please don’t come with a script. We want your honest, spontaneous, down-to-earth self. Make sure you feel comfortable. Many of our people will tell you they felt at home as soon as they arrived at their interview with us. If you feel the same, it says a lot about how you’ll fit in at Hilti. What you see at your interview is what you’ll get when you join us. So think less about the role, the location, the salary, and think more about whether you’ll be happy here. After all, you need to be cheerful about coming to work every day, so it’s important you feel the right vibe.

Understand our values. Our values of integrity, courage, teamwork and commitment are really important to us; they’re the heart of our business. If you identify with them, we’d love to know why and how. Give real examples. Try to share true examples of how you’ve approached and achieved things. We want to hear what you’ve done or would do in a particular situation, not what might be the right thing or how your company works or some hypothetical theory. We just want to know about the person sitting in front of us.

One more thing to add

Hilti Outperformer is a two-year program, where you’ll quickly be involved in a range of international projects, with lots of exposure to senior management. It’s fast paced and challenging, but we’ll closely coach and mentor you. The program is split into four main stages of work: • 12 months as an account manager or field engineer in home country • 3 months on an operational project in home country • 6 months on a strategic project in regional headquarters • 3 months on an international strategic project in another region

 

Employer Name: NetApp

Industry: Technology

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

Communications - Media with a minor in Journalism. I am currently a University Relations Manager responsible for leading our Americas recruiting efforts, developing impactful relationships with students and faculty on-campus and managing our leadership and development program for recent graduates called the Sales, Support and Services Academy.

Tell us about the company culture at NetApp.

Creating a model company is at the heart of everything we do. This means delivering value to each community we serve: customers, shareholders, employees, partners, and neighbors. We are committed to living our core values - trust and integrity, leadership, simplicity, adaptability, teamwork, go beyond and get things done! The strength of our culture means that we attract the industry’s best to work for our customers’ success. As a result, we’ve earned 13 consecutive years on the FORTUNE “100 Best Companies to Work For®” list.

What are some new initiatives underway at NetApp?

Flash plays a key role in customers’ digital transformation efforts as they seek to gain advantage through greater speed, responsiveness and value from key business applications—all while lowering total cost of ownership. All-flash array technology is the de facto choice as customers seek performance and economic benefits from replacing hard disk installations. NetApp has a highly differentiated and broad portfolio of all-flash and hybrid array offerings.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with NetApp?

NetApp looks for the following in students during the interview process - 1. Technical Competence, 2. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving, 3. Teamwork and Collaboration, 4. Workplace Readiness and Etiquette, 5. Verbal and Written Communication, 6. Leadership, 7. Curiosity and Flexibility and 8. Passion for Innovation

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at NetApp?

Skills/Expertise are most valuable - When interviewing at NetApp, 60% of our interview questions are behavioral based because we find that it is very important that we hire on a culture-fit approach. We are looking to hire interns and recent graduates that are authentic, have an entrepreneurial spirit, hunger for training and career advancement and will find ways to work better, faster and easier.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We hire a variety of students from different backgrounds that join NetApp as a QA/SW Development Engineer, Solutions Engineer, Technical Marketing, Product and Program Management, Sales, Technical Support, Professional Services, and Marketing Managers.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Your personal brand is a way for you to stand out in the crowd of applicants. I recommend ensuring you have a consistent brand on paper (resume and cover letter), online (LinkedIn), social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.) and in-person. Your first impression is critical and you never know how a company will find your information so I encourage you to put your best foot forward by having a brand that you are proud of and is consistent across all platforms.

 

Employer Name: Research Square

Industry: IT Services

Tell us about the company culture at Research Square.

We care about each other, and we care about helping researchers make an impact. People here work hard, have fun, and make a difference in the world of research communication. Our culture is summed up by our six core values: Exhibit personal humility and professional will, Enable the success of others, Own the success of the business, Embrace and fuel change, Fight for simplicity, and Show trust and vulnerability. We share a love of knowledge, challenge, discovery, and innovation.

What’s an interesting fact about your organization?

Though we have a great office in downtown Durham (NC), we are a remote-first company. In 2018, we grew to have over 50% of our workforce living and working outside of NC and around the US. Our flexible and results-focused work environment is a perk for even those in NC.

What are some new initiatives that your organization is currently working on?

Improving engagement for remote employees, Increased diversity and On-campus recruitment

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with Research Square?

Become familiar with our company's mission, culture and core values.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at Research Square?

Most of our roles require an advanced degree, typically in the hard sciences. We are looking for PhDs in all scientific fields who are interested in editing manuscripts to improve research communication globally.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We are actively recruiting graduate students in all STEM fields. We do not have a need for graduate students in the humanities or social sciences.

 

Employer Name: Teach For America (TFA)

Industry: Non-profit, Education

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

I graduated Summa Cum Laude from Arizona State University, where I majored in Psychology and Spanish. Inspired by the mission of Teach For America, I joined the corps after graduation and went on to teach 8th grade mathematics in Charlotte, North Carolina for two years. During this time, I completed my master's degree at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. I was deeply inspired by my students and the community in which I taught to continue to advocate for a more equitable education system. Because of this, I now lead our recruitment efforts at Duke University, where I seek out top leaders in the Blue Devil community to join Teach For America's collective network of change makers working toward creating systemic, lasting impact.

Tell us about the company culture at TFA.

Teach For America’s culture is unique in that it’s shaped by extraordinary, diverse leaders who all bring immense passion to their work. In the past five years alone, forty-two Teach For America alumni have been named to Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list. Regardless of sector or industry, our alumni are working towards a more equitable future for all. They are CEOs, civil rights attorneys, EdTech entrepreneurs, career educators, school leaders, elected officials, and they are all united by a shared experience and mission. Classroom leadership has been foundational for their long-term leadership. No other organization is made up of such an incredible group of change makers.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

At Teach For America, we are committed to realizing the diversity, equity, and inclusiveness we envision for the United States and its Indigenous Nations. In 2017-18, 6,400 corps members led alongside alumni in 50+ urban and rural regions across the U.S. Over 50% of our corps identifies as a person of color and ⅓ are the first in their families to graduate college. We know that true progress is only possible if each of us works effectively across lines of difference—with students, parents, partners, and each other—and if each of us understands and leverages the assets we bring to this work based on our identities and life experiences.

What are some new initiatives underway at TFA?

We have launched an exciting set of all-expenses-paid experiences for top undergraduates, each designed to prepare you for a career of impact. From an immersive spring break service trip to a multi-week paid summer fellowship, there are a variety of new ways to give participants the chance to explore social issues affecting our nation. These experiences also give participants the chance to meet other student leaders from across the country and expand their own network.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with TFA?

There is no one perfect fit for TFA. Corps members’ unique backgrounds make TFA diverse and give you an unparalleled opportunity to grow as a leader. During the interview phase, it is important to communicate your passion and conviction for social impact work. We seek leaders who have demonstrated leadership skills during their time in college and have a deep belief in the potential of what is possible. Additionally, applicants should focus on showcasing their organizational abilities, time management skills, and demonstrate excellent interpersonal skills. Teach For America is a highly selective program and we look for leaders that are positioned to succeed both inside and outside the classroom. Each applicant from Duke will be supported by a TFA representative to ensure they are best prepared for the interview process. For more information about who we look for and the interview process itself, you can visit our interview page here: https://www.teachforamerica.org/join-tfa

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at TFA?

We look for candidates that possess a deep belief in the potential of all kids and a commitment to do whatever it takes to expand opportunity for students, often informed by experience in low-income communities. Additionally, respect for individuals’ diverse experiences and the ability to work effectively with people from a variety of backgrounds is something that is an important characteristic to demonstrate during the interview process.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We seek out top leaders across all disciplines because we know each individual has unique experiences and skills that can be tremendous assets in the classroom. We believe that educational inequity is a systemic issue that will require systemic solutions. Solving this begins in the classroom as a TFA corps member where you’re a full-time teacher with the responsibility and opportunity to lead real change. After two years in the classroom, TFA alumni go on to pursue diverse careers to continue their impact. While many choose to stay in the classroom, others lead in a variety of fields such as education, politics, entrepreneurship, law, and medicine. TFA alumni share a lifelong passion for creating opportunities in low-income communities and working toward systemic change.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Our CEO, Elisa Villanueva Beard, gave powerful advice that I think will resonate with anyone who wants to make a meaningful impact after graduation: “I’m sure of at least one thing about the path forward: We must engage. If we hope to shape policies, laws, and culture, we must engage when we agree, and we must engage when we disagree. I invite you to join me in modeling the coalition-building that will be required to thrive and continue to deliver on our mission and promise to our students and the corps members and alumni who are advocating for them.”

What is one final comment that you would like to leave with students?

If you are interested in exploring options with Teach For America, please visit our website at Teachforamerica.org. Additionally, if you’re interested in talking with the Duke representative, please reach out directly to Rebecca Waters at Rebecca.Waters@teachforamerica.org

Zoom Out

By Nathan Wilson, M.Ed.

The idea behind Zoom Out , the Career Center podcast is to present questions to students that they may not be asking themselves, but are critical for finding meaning and happiness in their lives. Duke students can figure out any problem, but how can they find answers to questions never asked? College is a time when students have increasing agency to make decisions and pursue their own interests, which comes with a lot of internal and external pressures. Zoom Out was created to provide big-picture, self-reflective information using a medium that students can utilize on their own time so that they can be intentional about the choices they make at Duke and beyond. Such topics can be daunting, however, so I aimed to keep it light while providing students with some food for thought during the exciting, but often intimidating, process of professional development.  

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Internship Funding Sources for Undergraduate Students

By Leigh Ann Waring, M.A.

Are you considering an unpaid or low paying internship for summer but are in need of financial assistance? If so, you may want to explore the different types of funding sources that exist for college students. Summer funding is offered through several centers on campus, including the Duke Career Center. In addition, funding is also available through external sources such as professional associations and foundations. Please note some programs may have restrictions and may limit who qualifies based upon criteria such as academic programs, geographic location, and the type of experience being pursued. All funding programs have strict deadlines, with most applications due in late fall or early spring. Late submissions are rarely accepted so now is the time to start researching and planning your funding applications.

One of the funding sources available only to Duke University undergraduate students is the Career Center’s Internship Funding Program. The Internship Funding Program aims to reduce the financial challenges associated with participating in a wide range of low-paying or unpaid internships, thereby achieving the objectives of facilitating student participation in experiential career exploration and expanding the diversity of internship opportunities in which Duke students participate.

Through the generosity of corporate, individual and class donors, the Career Center is able to offer competitive grants ranging from $600 to $3,000 for undergraduate students who accept unpaid or low-paying summer internships. First-year students, sophomores, juniors, and first semester seniors from all academic majors are encouraged to apply. Students must be in good standing with the university and complete all steps in the application process in order to be considered. Students do not need a confirmed internship offer at the time of application, however offers will be verified prior to the processing of funding awards.

Unpaid or low-paying summer internships that provide students with a minimum of 240 hours of experience are eligible for funding. The Duke Career Center defines a low-paying internship as providing a student with $1500 or less gross pay for the summer (including both hourly wage and stipend wages). Supervised research projects are also eligible for funding. The Internship Funding Program is an application-based program and awards are granted at the recommendation of a university selection committee.

Additional information regarding student eligibility, qualification criteria for experiences, the application process, and program terms and conditions can be found at https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/career/programs/internship-funding-program. This year’s application period opens on January 28, 2019 and closes on February 28, 2019.

In addition to the Internship Funding Program, there are several other funding sources available through the university. To explore a variety of additional university-sponsored funding programs, please visit the Undergraduate Research Support Office’s searchable database. For assistance with identifying funding sources external to Duke, please schedule an appointment with a Career Center undergraduate adviser. The Career Center encourages students to seek out all funding opportunities for which they qualify.

Students with questions regarding the Internship Funding Program are encouraged to contact Leigh Ann Waring in the Duke Career Center, 919-660-1054 or leighann.waring@duke.edu.

 

Tips for Graduate Students: Exploring Opportunities in the Nonprofit Sector

By Rachel Coleman, M.S./Ed.S.

There are several different types of nonprofit organizations with various goals and missions. These can include education, health, environment, religion, human services, arts and humanities, international and foreign affairs, and more. Depending on the mission, nonprofit organizations will need personnel with diverse skill sets ranging from communication to research to finance. So, how do you determine if a career in the nonprofit sector is right for you?

First, it's important to consider what you're looking for from your next career steps. What are your goals, values, skills, and interests? Do those seem to align well with nonprofit organizations? To answer this last question, you'll want to do some research on what it's like to work for a nonprofit. The sites below can help you better understand what it's like to work in the nonprofit sector as well as view job boards to see the different opportunities available:

  1. Idealist.org
  2. Bridgespan.org 
  3. The NonProfit Times
  4. The Chronicle of Philanthropy
  5. Duke Career Center's Industry Guide on Nonprofit Careers

You can also review the organization using tools that help evaluate nonprofits. For example, GuideStar has information on over two million nonprofit organizations. You can review the organization you're considering to learn about their programs, operations, financials, and more. 

There are also professional associations that focus on this sector, including:

  1. Society for Nonprofits
  2. Young Nonprofit Professionals (YNPN)  Local chapter here in the Triangle

Joining a professional organization is a great way to connect with others interested in similar career paths, which gives you the opportunity to both build your professional network and learn more about nonprofit organizations. In addition to professional associations, remember to check the Duke Alumni Directory to connect with alums working in this sector as well. 

Gain Knowledge in Machine Learning and Data Science

No one has to miss out on the opportunity to learn about data science and machine learning. There are online courses offered through Coursera and +Data Science workshops. Read the full article. Visit CareerConnections to reconnect with the organizations that participated in the first annual Date Night with Data event hosted by the Duke Career Center.

Spotlight on the Duke Electric Vehicles (DEV) Club

DEV sets the Guinness World Record for the most fuel-efficient vehicle. Read the article.

Recommended Reading

The 2-Hour Job Search by Steve Dalton (MBA’04)

The Launch Book: Motivational Stories to Launch Your Idea, Business or Next Career by Sanyin Siang (T’96, MBA’02)

Power Ties: The International Student’s Guide to Finding a Job in the United States by Dan Beaudry

Upcoming Career Center Events

For more information, visit CareerConnections , Duke Event Calendar, Career Center Events

  • TechConnect on January 22
  • Career & Summer Opportunities Fair on January 24
  • Georgetown Government & Nonprofit Expo on February 8

 

Other Important Information

 

 

Fall 2018 Issue

Employer Name: Applied Predictive Technologies (APT) 

Recruiting_Duke@aptmail.com

Industry: Consulting and Tech/Software

Tell us about the job opportunities and the company culture at APT.

We recruit lots of Duke students from a variety of different majors. The roles we recruit for at Duke are Business Consultant, Software Engineer, Associate Product Manager, Quality Assurance Engineer.

APT creates a culture of fun, hard work, innovation, and collaboration. At APT you'll learn that work can be fun- there are always different events going on in the office and there is a plethora of free food. Employees at APT love coming to work because they love the people they work with!

What is an interesting fact about APT?

We are a leading analytics software company that empowers top global organizations across a wide range of industries to make data-driven decisions with confidence. APT’s client portfolio features some of the world’s best known brands, including Walmart, Starbucks, Coca-Cola, Victoria’s Secret, T-Mobile, and others. With more than a dozen offices internationally, we are proud of our collaborative culture, which embodies hard work, innovation, and analytic excellence. Working at APT provides a unique opportunity for unparalleled professional growth, in an environment where you can immediately make an impact. In recent years, APT has been named a Best Place to Work by Glassdoor, Top Workplace by The Washington Post, and a Top Workplace for Millennials by Fortune Magazine.

What are some new initiatives underway at APT?

We are constantly innovating and creating new products at APT. APT empowers organizations to make data-driven decisions using APT's software.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with APT?

It depends what role you are interviewing for. I would recommend starting with looking at the interview prep resources posted on our website. Each candidate who is selected for interviews, is also paired up with an APT interview buddy who can help you prepare for your interview.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for positions at APT?

We look for candidates from a wide variety of backgrounds. Most importantly, we look for students who have good communication, initiative, analytics and relevant work or research experience.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

The two most important guidelines for interviewing at APT are to relax and have fun. Come into your interview with the mindset that you are engaging in a fascinating problem-solving exercise — one that will require all the creativity you can muster — and you will put your best foot forward. Be yourself, Know every detail on your resume in depth, Be prepared for case interviews, Be able to answer the question- "Why APT?", and Ask us questions — interviewing is a two-way street. Most importantly, have fun! To Apply to a role at APT visit www.joinapt.com/apply or contact us at Recruiting_Duke@aptmail.com

Meet the APT team at the Fall Career Fair on September 26th!

 

Employer Name: California State Auditor Q&A Chat with Glen Fowler 

Industry: State Government

Tell us about your company and industry.

We conduct audits for the California Legislature. (It’s like consulting within state government.)

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

Personally, I have a BA in Political Science and an MPA. When I first joined the office, I was hired to conduct performance audits. After a few years, I took over the responsibility of managing Recruiting and Training for the office. We hire individuals with degrees in ALL majors!

Tell us about the company culture at California State Auditor.

We work in teams and collaborate to examine problems/issues/alleged mismanagement, and report our findings and recommendations to CA's Joint Legislative Audit Committee. We conduct performance audits, financial audits, and investigations. We work on challenging and diverse assignments. For example, we have conducted audits and investigations in areas that range from "Homelessness in California" to "High Speed Rail". No experience is required; we have an extensive professional development program.

What is a typical work day as an Auditor?

As an Auditor Evaluator, no two days are alike: on one day you might be planning and scoping; on the next day you might be conducting interviews; then you might be collecting data, or surveying, or reviewing case files; and then you might be conducting analyses; and then finally drafting a report. Typically, it takes about 5 to 6 months for a team to complete an entire Audit Report. It is then delivered to the Legislature who implements the recommendations. It's very rewarding! Our work really makes a difference!! Once the Audit is completed, you're assigned to another Audit with a new issue - you're joined by different team members with varied backgrounds and experience, and a different supervisor. It's quite dynamic and refreshing!

What are some new initiatives underway at California State Auditor?

We conduct audits on whatever issues interest the Legislature. Recently, we've conducted audits of local governments, the University of California, Transportation, Health and Human Services, CA High Speed Rail, Department of Corrections, Homeless in CA, among many others.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with California State Auditor?

We need folks who are flexible, and who can collaborate and work well in teams. Our audits resemble case study types of questions that students have experienced in their classes.

What skills/expertise are most valuable in a position at California State Auditor?

Successful candidates have strong analytical, written and oral communication skills.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We are seeking students pursuing degrees in ALL MAJORS to fill our 25+ Auditor Evaluator openings! We value having Audit teams comprised of members with a variety of academic backgrounds and experience. We regard this as a strength to how we conduct our audits and the reports themselves.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

If you still have time in selecting courses, I encourage you to take some business writing classes. The ability to write well is highly valued regardless of where you work.

What is one question that you would like to ask students?

Who wants to launch their career in Northern California? Sacramento is an awesome location, being relatively close to San Francisco, Napa, Lake Tahoe and Yosemite. And there's lots going on in the Sacramento area! In fact, Sacramento was recently named the 3rd Top City to where Millennials are Moving. 

 

Employer Name: Citi -Institutional Clients Group

Industry: Financial Services

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

I’m currently a Managing Director in our Capital Markets Origination division. After graduating from Duke with a BS in Economics and Political Science, I joined Citi as a first year analyst and have been with the firm ever since.

Tell us about the company culture at Citi.

The best word to describe Citi’s culture is “collegial.” That can be taken in several ways, all of which are correct. It encompasses our focus on internal personnel investment, opportunities, and development so we can better win for our shareholders and clients. But, it also describes the social closeness that defines the Citi experience. Citi’s culture is the primary reason I joined the firm out of college and the primary reason I choose to remain there today.

What are some new initiatives underway at Citi?

Too many to count across our many divisions and global geographies! Looking internally though, our firm has a great track record of promoting from within. Many of our senior leaders have been with the firm since starting as analysts or associates. After coming up through the ranks, we find ourselves in positions where we can create the early career experience that we would have wanted when first starting out.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with Citi?

When interviewing with an institution like Citi that recruits for many different programs at Duke, students should have a good understanding of the specific program they are interviewing for. What are its unique characteristics? How is it different from other divisions? What makes you a strong candidate for that specific program and not just for Citi or banking in general?

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at Citi?

Looking across various classes of analysts and associates, the characteristics that differentiate good team members from great team members are, (1) strong communications skills, (2) an ability to multi-task on an almost-ridiculous level, and (3) most importantly, a passion for finance.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We strongly believe there is not one set academic path to Citi and we do not target specific majors or programs. Our best team members are ones that aren’t defined by a single set of technical knowledge, but instead have a broad-based education that allows them to apply an intellectual framework to solve the complex, large, and global challenges of our clients.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Use the job search process as an avenue to find your passion, whether it be in finance, marketing, science, public service, etc. Then, find a career that lets you pursue that passion with all your energy.

Meet the Citi team on September 6th (Info Session)!

 

Employer Name: General Motors (GM)

Industry: Automotive

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

Major: Economics 

Position: TRACK Financial Analyst, a 3-year rotational operations financial analyst program focused on leadership development

Tell us about GM and its company culture.

General Motors is a Fortune 10 automotive company that owns and operates several brands across the world, including Chevy (Chevrolet), Buick, GMC, and Cadillac in the US. For a company of its size, its culture of innovation, inclusion, and genuine care for its employees is unrivaled.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

General Motors was the first to market with an affordable long-range electric vehicle (Bolt).

What are some new initiatives underway at GM?

GM's autonomous strategy is vital for its vision of a world with zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion. It is the industry leader in autonomous technology and is expected to deploy fully autonomous vehicles within the near future.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with GM?

Students should focus on rational problem solving and working through scenarios with various levels of ambiguity.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at GM?

Skills that are most useful for roles at General Motors include critical thinking and developing innovative solutions to complex problems, along with teamwork and the ability to collaborate with others across numerous disciplines.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

As a Fortune 10 company, General Motors employs individuals across all disciplines, including engineering, finance, marketing, and planning.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Innovation starts with an individual and grows into a movement. Be that individual who is willing to think outside of the box, but never forget why that box exists.

What is one question that you would like to ask students?

What is the most important factor you consider when applying to an employer outside of compensation and prestige?

Meet the General Motors (GM) team at the Fall Career Fair on September 26th!

 

Employer Name: Seacrest Studios Q&A Chat with Meredith Dean (www.meredithdean.com)

Industry: Broadcast Media/Radio/TV/Healthcare

Tell us about your company and industry. 

In collaboration with The Ryan Seacrest Foundation, we aim to uplift our patients and families through the creative realms of radio, television, and new media right from their hospital rooms. The studio programming is broadcast to patient rooms via closed-circuit televisions so that all 200+ children and families can participate in the fun. Patients can tune in to channel 99 to enjoy the broadcasts and they even have the ability to request songs or ask questions of interviewees. It is our goal at Seacrest Studios at LCH to create happy memories for them during their hospital stay. If you’d like to find out more information you can visit http://ryanseacrestfoundation.org/ or www.carolinashealthcare.org/seacrest-studios-lch

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title? 

I have a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (A.B.J.) degree in Digital & Broadcast Journalism and New Media Certificate. Currently, I’m a Program Coordinator.

Tell us about an internship opportunity at Seacrest Studios. 

The production internship at Seacrest Studios is a part of LCH's volunteer program and looks for dedicated college radio/television broadcast students that have interest in the communication/journalism field. Seacrest Studios provides students with a chance to learn how to run a radio/TV station. Interns are required to create their own on-air shows and content with the interest of their audience in mind. Interns gain experience working with studio equipment as well as conducting on-air interviews. Seacrest Studios has regular visits from celebrities passing through town. It is important that interns hold a professional attitude during these visits and interviews. Interns must remember that the guest is here for the patients and their entertainment and work to ensure the experience is a happy and exciting one. It is the job of the interns to create a family-friendly environment by producing and hosting on-air games and activities. Some of the studio's current activities include lip sync battles, dance battles, bingo, karaoke, video production, semester music videos, celebrity interviews, and many more. These activities provide entertainment for the patients and distract them from what they are facing during their stay at the hospital. Interns regularly interact with the hospital's patients one-on-one and must understand how to interact with them, no matter their medical condition. The Seacrest Studios Internship is meant to be fun; however, it is important for interns to remember what their purpose is within the studio and the hospital. Interns are expected to act professionally in regards to their responsibilities.

What is an interesting fact about your company? 

We have hosted several celebrity guests since opening in 2013 including Selena Gomez, Ed Sheeran, John Legend, Demi Lovato, Nick Jonas, Cam Newton, One Republic, and more. During the visit, we usually do a 15 min patient Q & A/interview, a performance if time permits, and an autograph meet and greet.

What are some new initiatives underway at Seacrest Studios? 

Stay tuned :) Secret exciting new initiative for our patients!

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with Seacrest Studios?

We prefer applicants who have an online portfolio/personal website that details all of their work samples including video editing, photography, on-air work, graphic design, etc. They should have a good understanding of the Ryan Seacrest Foundation's impact on patients and have information from researching all 10 studios across the US.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at Seacrest Studios?

Emotional Intelligence is paramount for this job. Candidates should know how to support patients and families emotionally while also being very professional in the radio/TV station. We look for team players who want to have a lot of fun in the studio while also providing compassion & uplifting content on-air to make our patient's stay at Levine Children's as wonderful as possible!

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students? 

Production Interns & Volunteers

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students? 

Know a little something about everything to connect on some level with every person you meet. It will help you personally and professionally. Additionally, treat every person you meet in life with respect and dignity - you never know what people may be going through. Empower others.

What is one question that you would like to ask students? 

What are some activities or events that you think would enhance the patient experience at Seacrest Studios and Levine Children's Hospital?

 

Employer Name: Stryker Corporation

Industry: Medical Device/ Technology 

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

Major: B.S. Mechanical Engineering; Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering

Tell us about the company culture at Stryker.

Definitely a work hard, play hard culture. Super engaged employees. People really love working here.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

We have offices around the globe. Many people take international assignments as part of their career development.

What are some new initiatives underway at Stryker?

Robotic surgery is a big growth area for us.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with Stryker?

Be able to describe your professional passions. It's not enough to have worked on some cool projects. You need to show that you are passionate about them!

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at Stryker?

Make sure you start scouting for internships your freshman year and applying for positions your sophomore year. Lots of students lack practical work experience gained via an internship. A lab rotation isn't the same. 

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

We have diverse roles in R&D, HR, Sales, IS, Marketing, Regulatory Affairs, Finance, etc. As a result, we hire from all degree programs.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Take advantage of Duke's career services / events. Get out and meet with employers. Don't just apply through CareerConnections and hope you get an interview. The best way to distinguish yourself is to show up and actually introduce yourself.

What is some information that you would like for students to share?

I love to hear about projects that students have worked on that they're genuinely excited about.

Meet the Stryker team at the Fall Career Fair on September 26th!

 

Spotlight on Alumni 

Q&A Chat with Cecile Franke (’16) of Gerson Lehrman Group: GLG

Industry: Business Services, Consulting

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

At Duke, I majored in Public Policy and German, and minored in Economics. I started at GLG a few months after graduating in our Client Service Associate program. Currently, I am a Research Manager (and have been for about a year), working in our Professional Services Firms business unit. In this role, I work directly with our clients on their various projects, as well as manage and train Junior and Senior Associates going through the associate program.

Tell us about the company culture at GLG.

At GLG, you work in a fast-paced environment and are constantly challenged to tackle new projects/learn about new topics. You work closely with your teammates/managers every day and are always surrounded by fun and interesting co-workers!

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

GLG's headquarters are in New York, but our largest office is actually in Austin, TX.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with GLG?

Organization and time management skills, attention to detail, communication and presentation skills

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at GLG?

The ability to communicate across different teams, clients, levels/tenures is really important at GLG (especially when things need to get done quickly!). Finding ways to show that you are a strong communicator even when under pressure is valuable.

What are additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

The Client Service Associate Program hires students across a huge variety of majors/fields of study.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Do you research! Try to learn a bit about the types of clients we work with and how we work with them before going into an interview.

What is one question that you would like to ask students?

What about working at GLG is the most interesting/exciting to you?

Meet the GLG team at the Fall Career Fair on September 26th!

 

Q&A Chat with James Ferguson (’06) of Global Endowment Management, LP

Industry: Investment Services

Tell us about your company and industry.

I work for Global Endowment Management, LP (GEM) and we invest on behalf of mainly US endowments and foundations. We were founded in 2007 when Thrus Morton, previously the CIO of Duke's endowment, left to create GEM.

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

I was an '06 econ major and was also a member of the investment club at Duke. I currently lead our public investments team. I worked for one of the leading real estate developers in the Southeast for my first six years after Duke. It was an incredible experience where I saw the best and worst real estate markets over the last twenty years, all within a six-year period. As much as I enjoyed real estate, I found myself spending nights and weekends reading annual reports, following investment manager filings, and going through Value Line with my dad. I eventually realized that I should spend all of my professional time on investing and was fortunate enough to get reconnected with the GEM team at the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting in 2012.

Tell us about the company culture at GEM.

GEM is a very flat, entrepreneurial place where you have a lot of autonomy at an early age. My favorite thing about investing is the intellectual challenge and the reality that we face imperfect information every day but still have to make decisions. As a result, it's not an industry where you can rely solely on experience so we embrace this by creating an environment where our younger colleagues have the opportunity to make meaningful investment decisions very early in their careers.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

Our core focus is to find the best investment managers around the globe. It's simple but not easy and as a result, we spend a decent amount of time traveling to find these off the radar managers. I've filled my passport since I joined GEM in 2012 and have been to multiple places in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and South America.

What are some new initiatives underway at GEM?

We're exploring the increased focus on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors in investing today. We've always incorporated elements of this into our process but we're spending time to determine if a more deliberate effort in this area makes sense.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with GEM?

The Essays of Warren Buffett is a great introduction to investing, not just from a recruiting standpoint but for learning the basics from arguably one of the best investors/teachers ever.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for an internship position at GEM?

We're looking for people who are self-taught and have an ability to quickly learn as well as find their own voice. There is no certainty in investing so we need people who can balance a lack of information with a balanced decisiveness. We can teach the basics of investing but we can't teach a passion for our work. Investing is one of those fields where you're always learning and never actually know everything so an insatiable desire to learn is probably the best important characteristic of long term success.

What are some additional job opportunities?

We primarily recruit for undergrad summer interns as well as analyst roles for recent graduates. We occasionally hire investment team members with more experience but primarily rely on summer interns to fill our full time analyst roles. The key behind an investment team is diversity of thought so we look for majors/backgrounds that complement our existing investment team when we fill a new role. As a result, intellectual curiosity and the ability to work well with others are probably more important than a specific major.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Early on, the most important thing is to find a job where you have an opportunity to build a strong foundation. It's always difficult to know what you'll do over the course of your career but if you find a place that offers broad and deep experience early on, that will put you in a position to really succeed long term, regardless of what you ultimately decide to do.

Meet the Global Endowment Management, LP team at the Fall Career Fair on September 26th!

 

Q&A Chat with Alex Overstrom (’06), EVP & COO, Corporate & Institutional Banking and Asset Management at PNC Financial Services Group

Industry: Banking

What was your major/degree program in college, and what is your current job title?

After graduating from Duke in 2006 with a major in Public Policy, I joined Goldman Sachs where I spent eight years working in their Investment Banking and Firmwide Strategy groups. In 2014, my family and I moved to Pittsburgh where I had the opportunity to join PNC to lead strategy for their Corporate & Institutional Banking business. Since joining the bank, I’ve had the privilege to serve in a number of roles, including heading PNC Aviation Finance (#1 corporate jet financing business in the U.S.) and now serving as Chief Operating Officer for both our Corporate & Institutional Banking and Asset Management businesses.

Tell us about the company culture at PNC.

PNC is a vastly different organization than Goldman Sachs or some of the other banks in New York; we’re very much a Main Street bank, not a Wall Street bank. That isn’t a comment on our capabilities or the sophistication of our people, instead it’s a statement about what we focus on: building deep, local and meaningful relationships with our clients and our communities to help them each prosper. We’ve seen time and time again that whether we are helping our clients save for retirement, buying a new home, building a new business or expanding a large firm, when our clients thrive, we thrive. So our goal is to bring all of the products and capabilities of one of the largest banks in the country, but to deliver them locally, in a relationship-based model, without taking excessive risk and without ever trading short-term opportunity for long-term value.

What is an interesting fact about your organization?

PNC is truly a local bank – we all live in the communities where we work. As such, PNC has a really strong focus on supporting each of the communities we operate in. One particular program that everyone at PNC is really proud of and engaged in is Grow Up Great - a $350 million, bilingual program focused on early childhood education in our markets. Grow Up Great serves children from birth to age five, with an emphasis on reaching underserved children – research has shown that high quality early education is a significant predictor of future success. In addition to making significant philanthropic donations across our communities, each year our employees receive 40 hours of paid time off to volunteer for Grow Up Great, and in 2017 alone our employees volunteered nearly 89,000 hours.

What are some new initiatives underway at PNC?

While historically people may not have associated banking with innovation, today our ability to effectively compete is prefaced on our ability to innovate. At PNC, innovation starts with ideation and testing new ideas. So we’ve started conducting regular innovation sessions that we call “APIFests.” API Fest is a high-energy, 240-hour competition to prototype technology solutions to real business problems. Teams choose from use cases and design, build and pitch solutions to a panel of judges. The competition is open to all employees with a variety of skills including designers, developers, product managers, project managers, business analysts, marketers and anyone with good ideas! We have implemented a number of ideas and solutions that have come from our APIFests, and are focused on getting even more people involved. We’ve also launched numo, a PNC-owned incubation firm that focuses on solving some of our business’ most challenging problems.

What should students focus on while preparing to interview and work with PNC?

While every business line is going to have different preferences, I’d say that overall we are looking for hard working, energetic and curious people who want to work at a Main Street bank… people that share our vision for what banking should be – local, relationship-based and focused on helping our clients and communities prosper. In my experience, the most successful people are those that are proactive, have a ton of positive energy, are willing to go the extra mile and are passionate about helping our clients build better lives and better businesses. In terms of interview preparation, my number one piece of advice is to prepare! Understand what PNC is all about – take a look at our website, our Annual Report, our Corporate Social Responsibility report. Get a sense for the business or function you are interviewing with – what do they do, what’s their role in supporting the PNC business model, what experiences have you had that might give your interviewer a sense that you’d do well in that area. Also, reach out! Talk to our recruiters, to professionals at PNC, to me… we’re always happy to chat.

What skills/expertise are most valuable for a position at PNC?

What we’re doing at PNC is not rocket science, in fact it’s quite simple: helping our clients run their businesses and lives better. Sure, there are some esoteric and technical areas, but by-and-large the traits needed to succeed are basic: passion, curiosity, a strong work ethic and desire to help our clients. I got into finance having barely taken an accounting course, and all of PNC’s Development Programs offer strong training in the professional areas (e.g., credit training, etc.) you’ll need to be successful in your jobs. So we’re looking for people with all sorts of backgrounds and experiences; people who can complement and challenge our existing teams and help us grow.

What are some additional job opportunities, especially for graduate students?

Look at my own experience – I went into finance with a Public Policy degree. There’s no one major we are looking for, and given we have so many different parts of the organization – from Capital Markets to Corporate Banking to Technology and Innovation – we are looking for folks with all sorts of backgrounds and interests. What’s important is an academic record that shows a commitment to performance and an interest in being part of PNC’s future.

What is one piece of advice or helpful tip for students?

Join an organization with a business model and values that you really believe in. Work as hard as you can to get as much experience as you can – being young means you have a level of energy and opportunity that is unique. Use it. Push yourself to be informed. Seek to understand the context for what it is your business is doing and for what it is you are being asked to do. Be positive. And be proactive - do everything in your power to make your team and your boss successful. I’ve found over the course of my (relatively short) career that when I make my team successful, my own success has usually followed.

PNC will be hosting on-campus interviews in September and October, apply via CareerConnections!

The First Year Initiative for Undergraduate Students

By Christina Plante and Alicia Rhodes

We are Christina Plante and Alicia Rhodes, two career counselors who lead the First-Year Initiative. The purpose of this initiative is to help students discover what they are curious about and develop clarity and skills that will allow them to design their success at Duke and beyond. The Career Center has outlined 7 Competencies for Post-Graduate Success that answer how students can go from curiosity to clarity and work towards achieving their goals. We mainly focus on Reflect and Connect, the two foundational competencies that encourage students to think deeply about past experiences and connect with individuals who may share similar interests.

[View all 7 competencies]

We would like to share some exciting events happening this coming year, in addition to our individual appointments, Drop-in Advising, and job search skills workshops! Check out the event descriptions below. 

Key Events for First Years and Sophomores

Major Mixer
 A first year and sophomore mixer for students to chat with academic advisors, peer advisors, alumni, employers, Directors of Undergraduate Studies and career counselors for advice on choosing their major. (September)

Secrets to Success- Class of 2022 Edition
A first year only event where two Duke students will present first year's most relevant and frequently asked questions to David Ong, Senior Director of Corporate Recruiting at MAXIMUS Inc., and Bill Wright-Swadel, Assistant VP of Student Affairs, Fannie Mitchell Executive Director of the Duke University Career Center. (October)

Career Fair Back Stage Pass 
A bird’s eye view of the career fair from the 2nd floor track in Wilson Gym. Get an idea of how to navigate the fair using our digital guide, introduce yourself to employers, and other quick coaching tips and tricks. Offered a few times during the each career fair. (September, January)

Table for Six
An exploration event for first years in partnership with the Alumni Association. Sign up to have dinner with regional alumni and learn more about their fields. (March)

First Big Week
A Duke tradition that welcomes undergraduate students back to campus in the fall with community-focused activities, events and performances the first week of classes. Join the Career Center and Sophomore Year Experience for the Welcome Back Barbecue and visit the Career Center table at I&E Fest. (August)

PreHealth Check Up
A panel of health professionals will provide information on research, volunteering, shadowing, and health careers for first year students interested in prehealth. (September)

DEMAN 101
Fun, informative workshop to help Dukies learn what to expect at DEMAN Arts & Media Weekend when they meet alumni from companies like HBO, NBCUni, iTunes, CBS, and Google. (November)

Consulting Case Interviewing Clinic
Casual, fun way to understand and practice case interviewing. Hear from professionals and students who have successfully completed case interviews and work with professionals to polish case interview response skills. (September) 

Fannie Mitchell Expert in Residence
Visiting experts from a wide variety of fields give a campus talk and meet individually with students to provide career advice. (Ongoing)

Practice Interview Days (Online and In-Person)
A chance for students to brush up on their interview skills as they begin applying for internships, campus jobs, and leadership roles. Practice interviews will last 30 minutes and will include a post-interview discussion and critique. (September, January) 

Internship Events

Summer Opportunities & Funding Fair    |    Ignite Your Internship Search    |    Duke Career Center Internship Funding Program Information Sessions    |    InternMix: Peer to Peer Intern Mixer    |    Ready-Set-Intern

[See a complete list of our career fairs and more information about our events]

 

Finding an Internship

By Leigh Ann Waring

Are you planning on completing an internship for Summer 2019? Now is the time to begin your search! Depending upon your desired industry, some employers begin their summer internship recruitment during the fall semester. That means you need to prepare now so you don’t miss out on interviews and internship offers. If you need assistance, the Duke Career Center offers the following resources to help you maximize your internship search success:  

CareerConnections
This comprehensive database lists both internship and career-related opportunities with employers whom the Career Center has developed relationships. Included are opportunities with local, national, and international organizations. 

On Campus Interviews
Select employers visit Duke’s campus to conduct first round interviews. All on-campus interviews are held in the Career Center and are coordinated through CareerConnections.

Ignite Your Internship Search
This annual event showcases undergraduate and graduate internship programs from a variety of organizations in a fun, upbeat atmosphere. This year’s event is being held at 6:00 p.m. on October 30th in Gross Hall, room 107. Pre-registration via CareerConnections is recommended as seating is limited. 

Career Fairs
Career fairs are held both on-campus and virtually throughout the academic year.  Mark your calendar - the Fall Career Fair is being held on September 26th. Check the Career Center’s website for up-to-date information regarding Duke-sponsored career fairs as well as collaborative fairs with other institutions.

Networking events
Networking events are held throughout the academic year and include diversity events, coffee chats, employer-in-residence programs, industry nights, and employer-hosted career prep workshops. Events are listed in CareerConnections and require pre-registration.

Internship Series Online
This online resource provides access to 3,000+ organizations offering internships and summer jobs for students.

Summer Opportunities & Funding Fair
The Career Center is collaborating with other funding centers on campus to sponsor this one-stop-shop for summer funding, internships, global education and study abroad opportunities, undergraduate research and scholarship & fellowship information. This year’s fair will be held on October 15th from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in room 153 of Rubenstein Library.

InternMix
This peer-to-peer networking mixer is hosted during early spring semester. During this event, students who are interested in pursuing internships can meet with Duke students who have recently completed internships in a variety of industries. InternMix allows students to get real feedback from former interns in a fun, relaxed atmosphere, complete with “mocktails” and refreshments. Check the Career Center’s website for this year’s InternMix date, time, and location. This event welcomes both undergraduate and graduate students.

Fyrst Contact
This series of virtual discussion sessions are designed to facilitate connections between first-year undergraduate students and Duke’s valued employer partners. Check CareerConnections for Fyrst Contact session dates throughout spring semester. 

SophoMore Conversations
This program provides sophomore students the opportunity to meet and chat with employers regarding internships and early career programs while learning details on company industries and recruiting processes. Check CareerConnections for SophoMore Conversation dates throughout the academic year. 

Individualized appointments, drop-ins, and group workshops
The Career Center’s counseling staff is available to assist you with your internship search. Whether it is by appointment or through drop-in hours, counselors will meet with you individually to discuss your career goals, review job search materials, and answer questions relating to your internship search. Counselors also hold career-preparation workshops throughout the semester for students who prefer an in-depth discussion on resume writing, cover letters, interview preparation, and more. Appointment requests and registration for workshops are coordinated through CareerConnections.

 

Resources for Careers in Health/Biotechnology Pharmaceuticals, Life Sciences and Medical Devices

By Jennifer Levy

  • Students can discover a wide variety of careers and meet accomplished professionals by attending Career Center programs and events, especially our Careers Beyond Academia series, which is co-sponsored by The Graduate School and the Office of Postdoctoral Services at Duke. Upcoming sessions will include data science, research, biotech, pharma, business skills, policy, startups and many more.

  • Many alumni who have transitioned to careers in these industries tell us they wished they had learned about basic business concepts while in grad school. If you can’t take or audit a full course at Duke here are some other options: Do a self-paced online course like iBiology's Business Concepts for Life Scientists. Or check out Coursera for Duke (FREE for Duke students) and take an online course like Healthcare Innovation and Entrepreneurship or Business Metrics. You can also perform a real-life job simulation exercise through InterSECT such as their Market Analysis exercise.

  • In addition to the Career Center’s myriad events consider attending local networking events like those through the NC Biotech CenterNC Biosciences or LaunchBio to expand your knowledge and contacts.

  • Read the book Career Opportunities in Biotechnology and Drug Development , which provides detailed information on over 100 different careers.

  • Review our online Networking Guide so you can connect with alumni and professionals of interest.

Upcoming Workshops for Graduate Students and Postdocs
Register in CareerConnections

  • Job & Internship Search     August 28, October 11
  • Networking                         September 4, October 17
  • Cover Letter Writing           September 11, October 24
  • Preparing for Career Fairs
      and Employer Events       September 19, November 6
  • Interview Practice               September 25
  • Small Talk Practice             October 2

Careers Beyond Academia Series for Graduate Students

Attend the Careers Beyond Academia Series for tips on resume writing, communicating transferable skills, interviewing, and career pathing. [See this fall’s schedule]

 

Spotlight on the Duke Advanced Professional Degree Consulting Club (Duke APDCC)

By Matthew Tedesco and Zhiping Mao

The Industry Elite. The historical and the up-and-coming. The corporations you know as household names have earned their place through careful navigation of the business world. They now, more than ever, require the cutting-edge strategy and operations advice only a select few can provide, seeking firms that provide the top candidates from top undergraduate, MBA and graduate programs.

The field of consulting is fast-growing and fast-paced. If you've ever wanted to make an impact on a wide variety of industries, join the Duke Advanced Professional Degree Consulting Club. Duke APDCC is the campus's largest student-run consulting club, having grown to 600+ members since its inception in 2012. We work to enhance career opportunities and provide education and development for advanced degree students interested in the consulting industry. In the last five years, we have hosted multiple nation-wide case competitions, attracting students from more than 20 elite universities. We also host case interview workshops and inter-disciplinary networking events, with guest speakers and alumni from top consulting firms providing industry orientation and connections through our industry outreach. Recently, we launched our own Micro-Consulting Project Program to bring the expertise of Duke APDCC consulting teams to more than a dozen companies in diverse industries, providing real industry experience.

Our mission is to provide our clients with effective solutions from dedicated collegiate expertise. We aim to bring consulting capabilities to students of all backgrounds. 

We can be reached at https://sites.duke.edu/dukeapdconsulting/, or by email at duke-apd-consulting@duke.edu.

 

Tips for Success

Reflect on your career interests and the things you enjoy doing, practice compelling self-introductions, compile your accomplishments and write your resumes and cover letters, and get advice on accepting or considering full-time offers from summer internships.

 

Recommended Reading

Finding your North Star: Claiming the Life You Were Meant to Live by Martha Beck

 

The International Advantage: Get Noticed. Get Hired by Marcelo Barros, MBA [website]

 

Upcoming Career Center Events

Visit CareerConnections for more information

Duke University Calendar of Events

Employers Recruiting at Duke for the First Time this Fall

Information Sessions
A Helping Hand
Blue Heron Research Partners
Castleton Commodities International
Cowen
Even Responsible Finance
Oak Hill Advisors L.P.
The Estee' Lauder Companies Inc.
Wellington Management

Visit CareerConnections for the full list of employer information sessions

Fall Career Fair
2nd Order Solutions
Crow Holdings Capital Real Estate
Dept. of Health & Human Services
EAB
Education International Cooperation
Epic
Even Responsible Finance
Global Bankers Insurance Group
Hillstone Restaurant Group
McDonald's Corporation
Meeting Street Schools
NRD Raleigh
Qualtrics

Visit the Digital Career Fair Guide for a full list of companies attending the Fall Career Fair

 

Get to Know Two Local Employers

  • Q2 Solutions/EA Genomics (IQVIA quest joint venture) is recruiting for data scientists, mechanical engineers and programming (robotics and automation), biophysics and electrical engineering, and positions in policy/ethics. Visit their website for more career opportunities. They’ll be participating in some on-campus recruiting activities this fall!
  • Precision Biosciences is recruiting for research scientists and bioanalytics scientists. Check out their website for more jobs and information.