Center for Multicultural Affairs

Multicultural Education

We support opportunities for students to intellectually explore issues about race, ethnicity, social economic status, national origin, and gender.

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Culture Clash is a series of exhibits hosted in the Alcove outside of the CMA Lounge. Culture Clash aims to provide multicultural and social justice education to build and/or strengthen bridges between different communities at Duke and beyond. The exhibit provides guests of the CMA to explore the intricacies of the human experience with the focus of building sustainable, authentic, and healthy relationships.

Culture Clash is an exhibit hosted by CMA. Culture Clash aims to provide multicultural and social justice education to build and/or strengthen bridges between different communities at Duke and beyond. The exhibit provides guests of the CMA to explore the intricacies of the human experience with the focus of building sustainable, authentic, and healthy relationships.

For more information, email to dcma@studentaffairs.duke.edu

Latinx Heritage Month (September 15-October 15)
Each year, Americans observe National Latinx Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. During Latinx Heritage Month, we at Duke strive to increase awareness about Latinx and Latin American histories, identities, cultures, accomplishments and address issues that affect Latinx and Latin Americans internationally, within the United States and on campus. For more information, dcma@studentaffairs.duke.edu

For more information on Latinx Heritage Month visit: http://www.hispanicheritagemonth.gov/about/

Native American Heritage Month (November)
What started at the turn of the twentieth century as an effort to gain a day of recognition for the significant contributions the Native Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a whole month being designated for that purpose. This commemorative month aims to provide a platform for native people to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance, and ways and concepts of life. This gives native people the opportunity to express their community and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and friendship in their local area. Past programs have included public lectures, film screenings, and storytelling. For more information,  jnai.adams@duke.edu.

For more information on Native American Heritage Month visit: http://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/about/

Black History Month (February)
Black history month expanded from Negro History Week (February 1926) founded by historian Carter G. Woodson and his organization the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. (Excerpt from an essay by Daryl Michael Scott, Howard University, for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History) The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture centralizes the efforts of student Black affinity organization during the month of February for celebrating the history and culture of Black people in America. Throughout the month, discussions will be held addressing relevant issues of the day. For more information,  mlw@studentaffairs.duke.edu.

For more information on Black History Month visit: http://africanamericanhistorymonth.gov

Asian/American Pacific Islander Heritage Month (Celebrated at Duke during April)
May is Asian American/Pacific Islander Heritage Month – a celebration of Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, AAPI encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island). Typically celebrated in May, we at Duke choose to honor it in April to allow a full month of festivities and events on campus, reflecting on the histories, accomplishments, and diversity of the AAPI community. Student organizations, offices, and academic departments are all encouraged to host events and contribute to our annual calendar of events for A/APIHM! For more information,  joanne.kang@duke.edu.

For more information on Asian/American Pacific Islander Heritage Month visit: http://asianpacificheritage.gov

Crossroads is a dialogue series developed by the Center that aims to increase self and social-awareness on the intersection of our identities such as race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, social economic status, sexual orientation, ability and religion. By participating in this program, the desired goal is to foster intergroup community through a diversity of identities and explore personal experience and societal issues.

For more information, joanne.kang@duke.edu 

AAPI Crossroads

Started in 2016 and formerly named "AAPI CommuniTea", AAPI Crossroads is a specifically focused dialogue on issues concerning the AAPI community at Duke and beyond. Promoting an intersectional reflection of the AAPI racial identity, each discussion will examine the intersections of the AAPI community with another social identity. Past events include Media Representation of AAPIs (October 2016), Asian Interethnic Prejudices (February 2017), and AAPI LGBTQIA+ Intersections (March 2017).

AAPI Crossroads welcomes all students, staff, and faculty of any racial background! Stay tuned for 2017-2018 dates on our website. For more information,  joanne.kang@duke.edu.