Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture

Training

MLWC Training Opportunities

The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture is excited to offer a variety of training opportunities to our university partners.  While we have a set of existing trainings, we are able to customize our offerings to meet the needs of specific groups.

Due to Covid-19, trainings are being offered virtually. We invite you to fill out the form below. 

We are pleased to offer a number of trainings and workshops listed below. To sign up for one of those specifically, please fill out this Mary Lou Williams Center Training Registration Form.

Looking for an opportunity to host a training or discussion with your group? Please click here to fill out our Training Application form to speak with a member of our team about a personal training for your group. 

 

FALL 2020 TRAININGS OFFERED 

via ZOOM (link will be provided upon registration) 

Find a Downloadable PDF of Trainings HERE!

DATE: 

Tuesday, October 6, 2020 | 12:00 - 1:30pm 

Thursday, October 23, 2020 | 6:00pm - 7:30pm

FORMAT: Training

CATEGORY: Anti-Racism; Equity

LEVEL: Introductory

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Students; Staff; Faculty

SUMMARY:  We find ourselves at a unique moment in history, during a period of unprecedented international unrest over racial equity and anti-Black racism, and a national call to action to confront our legacy of White supremacy. In this training, part 1 of 2, we will explore the foundations of why and how we got here. Facilitators will: provide participants with key knowledge of concepts and terms related to power, race, privilege, justice, and equity; briefly explore the history of anti-Black social and political policies that have contributed to inequality; and help partcipants understand that ourp resent moment is rooted far beyond our present time.

DATE: 

Tuesday, October 13, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Thursday, October 29, 2020 6:00pm - 7:30pm

FORMAT: Training

CATEGORY: Anti-Racism; Equity

LEVEL: Intermediate

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Students; Staff; Faculty

SUMMARY: In part 2 of 2, we will begin exploring with participants the importance of moving from a framework of "not-racist" to one of "anti-racist", and challenge them to explore the next steps. Facilitators will: challenge participants to consider how anti-racist principles apply to them; use design-thinking principles to help participants consider how anti-racist systems could operate in personal & professional settings; and consider ways these systems could be disrupted.

DATE: Tuesday, November 10, 2020 | 6:00pm - 7:30pm

FORMAT: Workshop

CATEGORY: Racial Identity

LEVEL: Introductory

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Students

SUMMARY: In this training, Black-identified students will learn about the basics of identity development, consider how their ethnic-racial identity has developed, and be challenged to explore their own unique relationship with their Blackness. In a world where our country is experiencing unprecedented unrest due to the ongoing fight to assert the sanctity and value of Black life, this is an important process for Black students; especially those attending historically White-serving institutions.

DATE: 

Friday, October 16, 2020 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Friday, November 13, 2020 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm 

FORMAT: Training

CATEGORY: Be Fit, Live Well

LEVEL: Intermediate

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Graduate Students; Staff Faculty

SUMMARY: For many people of color, the stress and trauma experienced when coping with racism, everything from workplace microaggressions to seeing yet another unjust, racialized killing, can produce symptoms close to posttraumatic stress disorder. In this training for staff, faculty, and students, we will explore the ideas of race-based stress and racial battle fatigue, help participants understand the impact of these constructs, and encourage the development of coping mechanism for people of color.

DATE: Saturday, November 7, 2020 | 1:00pm - 4:00pm 

FORMAT: Workshop

CATEGORY: Racial Identity

LEVEL: Intermediate

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Students

SUMMARY: The traditional concept of "cultural capital" posits that to suceed, we must be like those who are at the top of the hierarchy. In this workshop, students will explore 6 kinds of capital available to them already as a result of their Blackness, helping them to understand the strengths inherent in their ethno-racial and cultural identities.

FORMAT: Discussion Series

CATEGORY: Anti-Racism; Equity

LEVEL: Introductory

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Students

SUMMARY: This wil be an opportunity for students to meet with the staff of the Mary Lou and have an honest dialogue about the content of the required anti-Black racism session. We imagine this space to be one where students can come to seek clarity, process content for greater understanding, and begin considering what the training means for the time at Duke. These conversations are hosted in conjunction with all of our fellow Identity and Cultural Centers.

DATE: TBD

FORMAT: Discussion Series

CATEGORY: Anti-Racism; Equity

LEVEL: Introductory

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Students; Staff; Faculty

SUMMARY: Based on the book of the same name by author Ijeoma Oluo, this weekly discusson series will dissect key topics in the text, chapter by chapter, including microaggressions, language, White supremacy, being an ally, and intersectionality. Pre-reading the book is not required for participation in the discussions.