Student Engagement

  • Monday Motivations

    Free Food | Friendly Folk | Casual Conversation.  


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  • Culture Clash

    Culture Clash

  • Party Monitor Training

    Party Monitor Trainings

    Party Monitor Training was developed at the requested by  of student leaders and is coordinated through the Duke Student Wellness Center.

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Who We Are: 

Student Affairs and our academic partners are integrating experiential learning with classroom instruction in all aspects of Duke life, on campus and beyond. There are opportunities everywhere to explore your interests, to get involved, and when the time is right, to lead the way.

Have You Heard?

Feb 02, 2015

Happy belated 2015! I am studying abroad in Madrid this semester as part of the Duke in Madrid program. We are only 30 + days into the year, and already it has brought me so many adventures. So much to be grateful for.

So why, you might be wondering, am I still blogging on Student Affairs when I could be at the Museo del Prado looking at Picasso’s Guernica, eating tapas, or at least doing my homework, which must know I am a Duke student after seeing how much I have received over the past few days. I think the answer to this is best described by a Duke 360 photo I saw very early in the New Year. (https://document360.duke.edu/2015/01/05/january-5-2015/). To put it another way, you can take the girl out of Duke but you can’t take Duke out of the girl.

Oct 15, 2014

We had just wrapped up at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum, drained from taking in all the incredible history exhibited in the museum’s three buildings. The consensus was to take the tram to a spot for lunch, then hop on it again to find a baklava shop we’d heard is amazing. The tram is one of several fantastic methods of public transportation used by what feels like everyone (at the same time) in the city of Istanbul. A seat on the bus, metro, or tram is a highly coveted spot that is not easily attained. In fact, sometimes just getting on any of these vehicles is a nearly impossible feat because they are so crowded. “Maximum Capacity” doesn’t seem to be a concept as firmly held here as it is in the U.S. As we approached the tram, desperately seeking nourishment after an exhausting outing of museum-going, we discovered hoards of other people on the platform who we would soon have to fight for a spot. The tram arrived and its doors opened, the poor passengers inside desperately trying to escape before being trampled by the masses boarding.