Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity

Words from Orlando Vigil at Duke

My name is Nicholas Antonicci, I use the pronouns he/him/his, and I'm the Director of the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity here at Duke University.

Yesterday, I woke to the news of tragedy of 50 innocent people killed at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, a gay bar on a night celebrating Latinx people and communities.

I struggle to put feelings and emotions into words, to put pain into soundbites that appease and comfort those around me.

Statements from Friday's Rally

Jack D explains what happened:

As many of you know, early in the morning yesterday someone entered my dorm and sprawled on the wall of the first floor, “Death to all fags @ Jack.” In just five words and an ‘at’ symbol, my sense of security and safety on this campus was shattered. 

Efforts have been made to find the assailant but the likelihood of success seems minimal. However, the person who wrote on the wall is greatly unimportant.

A Somewhat Less Vivacious Reflection on Pride

The Pride Parade last month, despite the rain, was full of excitement and celebration as always. Of course there were protesters trying to dampen the spirits, but the best part about Pride is that the love far outweighs the hate. It is a celebration of the LGBTQ+ community—the people, the history, the accomplishments—and it is one of my favourite events of the year. But as uplifting, validating and liberating as Pride can be, it can also be difficult, discouraging, and even invalidating for some.

Why Are We Celebrating Our Bodies?

Beginning next Monday, February 16th, Nutrition Services is partnering with many offices across campus to host a positive body image week.  In the past, we’ve celebrated National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, but found that students are already aware of eating disorders.  Renaming the week and focusing on learning to embrace our bodies can help students to move away from some of the behaviors that might increase risk of developing disordered eating and exercise patterns.

Ally Training

Become an Ally for the LGBTQ Community. Participate in campus training sessions and become part of the Duke Ally Network.

When Joshua Lazard started working within Duke Chapel less than a year ago, he noticed a rainbow placard hanging outside his supervisor’s office.

The card reads, “I am your ALLY,” and is given to Duke employees and students who go through ally training offered by Duke’s Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity.