Muslim Life at Duke

Muslim Life at Duke

Love Is A Verb, a screening and discussion

Love Is A Verb is an examination of a social movement of Sufi inspired Sunni Muslims that began in Turkey in the l960s and now reaches across the globe. The group is called Hizmet, the Turkish word for service or The Gulen Movement after its inspiration, leader and beloved teacher Fethullah Gulen, a man that Time Magazine named as one of the most influential leaders in the world in 2013.

Standup and Stand out – commitment & comedy on campus

A friar, an imam and a rabbi walk into a lounge … This might sound like the start of a joke, but actually, it’s the start of an interfaith gathering on campus. The Duke Chapel Lounge is not a 70s-era bar with dim lighting, fruity drinks and mood music, but it is a place where connections are made and interfaith interaction happens on a regular basis.

Duke students, faculty discuss the Syrian conflict

Duke students and faculty wrote down prayers on little index cards Saturday and placed them in a bag at the Duke Center for Muslim Life. At the end of the night, everyone took turns unfolding the cards and reading the well wishes aloud.

Let the Syrian people regain the justice and dignity they deserve. May Syrian President Bashar al-Assad step down and make way for a new, peaceful government. May all mothers know that their children are safe.

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New Forum for Expert Voices on Islam and Muslims

Protests in the Middle East, conflict in Syria, Muslim voters in the upcoming U.S. elections and other diverse topics involving Islam and the Muslim experience are the focus of a new website where scholars from leading universities have begun sharing their perspectives and research.

ISLAMiCommentary aims to inform public knowledge and discourse about the diversity of thought and cultures within Islam and Muslim communities, including those in the United States.

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Duke's Muslim Chaplain to Give N.C. Senate Prayer

Abdullah Antepli, Duke's Muslim chaplain, will offer the opening prayer at the June 5 session of the N.C. Senate.

Antepli said his prayer will focus mostly on healing, redemption, compassion and unity.

"I am deeply humbled and honored to receive the invitation to be the guest Chaplain in the N.C. Senate," he said. "I hope many more similar symbolic but very meaningful events will take place to foster our society's commitment to diversity, pluralism and inclusivity."

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